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Author Topic: Flower Pictures  (Read 6098 times)
MrILoveTheAnts
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« on: May 26, 2007, 12:15:13 AM »

Finally got some plants my bees like. Nepeta x faassenii (catmint).



Other Flowers




Lepeta


When more blooms I may add some.
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« Reply #1 on: May 26, 2007, 09:59:06 PM »

what zones will catmint grow in?

Sincerely,
Brendhan
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« Reply #2 on: May 27, 2007, 07:37:45 AM »

Catmint, Nepeta faassenii - Zones 3-10

Catmint is a beautiful ground cover with light, grayish-green leaves. Throughout the summer it displays an abundance of soft blue flowers. If the plant is cut back when it is finished flowering, it will produce new blooms. Since catmint is a member of the mint family, it also attracts bees, which help pollinate garden vegetables.

Brendhan I hope this helps you out.
Have a great day

James Shoemaker
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« Reply #3 on: May 27, 2007, 10:19:20 AM »

Thanks, I was using mammoth sunflowers.

Sincerely,
Brendhan
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« Reply #4 on: June 19, 2007, 04:49:34 PM »

What pretty flowers!  Great job taking the pics for us!

I have a patch of chocolate mint here that just started flowering.  Of course the girls are all over it.  I love mint, all it needs is some water and it reseeds and regrows every spring.  It's so handy for making drinks and cooking too.
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MrILoveTheAnts
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« Reply #5 on: June 20, 2007, 07:04:31 PM »





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MrILoveTheAnts
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« Reply #6 on: July 17, 2007, 01:05:23 PM »

Gladiolus


Butterfly Bush (Dark Knight)



Sunflower-ish plant (some sort of bulb plant)


Ironweed?

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annette
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« Reply #7 on: July 17, 2007, 06:10:55 PM »

Thanks, I was using mammoth sunflowers.

Sincerely,
Brendhan

How did you do with the sunflowers??? I have some mammoth ones just starting to flower and was wondering how the bees did on this. You do not sound to happy?Huh

Thanks
Annette
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Cindi
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« Reply #8 on: July 17, 2007, 09:20:38 PM »

MrILoveTheAnts.  What incredibly beautiful and breathtaking pictures.  I love to get up and close and personal with flower picture taking too.  I will be posting some eventually.  Keep those pictures coming on!!!  It will brighten up any old day.

Annette.  I think that bees love all sunflower.  I grow several species and they are always full of bees.  Sunflowers are majestic and one of the most beautiful flowers I can think of.  Have a wonderful day, beautiful life.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #9 on: July 18, 2007, 10:53:26 AM »

My bees have been given directions and they are on there way over to your buffet! Nice pics. The bees were all over my lavender this year too! Love the gladiola pic. So soft and well lit. Great composition!
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« Reply #10 on: July 19, 2007, 06:01:30 AM »

MrILoveTheAnts, your yellow bulb plant-sunflower is a dahlia of some sort.  Gorgeous pictures!
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« Reply #11 on: July 19, 2007, 10:14:32 AM »

Bees and Flowers from Slovenia. I am sorry but I really don't know what kind of flowers are those. They are around our house and mother-in-law is taking care of them Cheesy













This one is my favorite Smiley



You can check some photos of my bees and hive on website in my signature.

Enjoy
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« Reply #12 on: July 19, 2007, 10:20:41 AM »

The last picture is a winner  grin
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« Reply #13 on: July 19, 2007, 10:33:51 AM »

It is my favorite hehe Cheesy

This was taken at 5am or couple of minutes later in the morning. I was surprised to see all the bees coming in with pollen this early....

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« Reply #14 on: July 19, 2007, 11:26:56 AM »

TOPSBARLO-

Great pics too. Your bees look different than my italian hygenics. What type of honetbees are they?
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« Reply #15 on: July 19, 2007, 12:03:00 PM »

TOPSBARLO-

Great pics too. Your bees look different than my italian hygenics. What type of honetbees are they?


Hi

Those are Carniolan bees Smiley

Here is some more info from wikipedia !

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carniolan_honeybee

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MrILoveTheAnts
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« Reply #16 on: July 19, 2007, 01:56:15 PM »

MrILoveTheAnts, your yellow bulb plant-sunflower is a dahlia of some sort.  Gorgeous pictures!


It seems I have two of those Dahlia plants but they look nothing alike. Thank you for the identification.

More Photos!


Purple Cone Flower


Sun Flower with a cute little green eyed bee on it. Awww


Some sort of mud wasp on Raspberries flowers. Not exactly a flower picture but the green went with the color scheme.

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KONASDAD
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« Reply #17 on: July 19, 2007, 08:55:37 PM »

what camera are you using? Looks great. Love the wasp upside down.
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MrILoveTheAnts
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« Reply #18 on: July 19, 2007, 09:08:55 PM »

It's just an Olympus SP 510UZ, 7.1 MP, 10x zoom, 2.5 LCD (whatever that is). Also it has a Super Macro feature for close up shots. It's good for honey bee shots but anything smaller starts to get fuzzy.
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Cindi
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« Reply #19 on: July 23, 2007, 09:06:45 AM »

Beautiful pictures, guys.  Love it when pictures are posted and we are taken into your part of our world.  Beautiful, keep 'em comin' on.  Have a wonderful day, beautiful life.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
MrILoveTheAnts
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« Reply #20 on: September 04, 2007, 11:11:04 PM »

Sedum!

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Cindi
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« Reply #21 on: September 06, 2007, 10:17:57 AM »

MrILoveTheAnts.  Some very beautiful pictures.  I love to see the pictures when they come up looking so large actually.  My sedum is just beginning to come into bloom too, different species though.  I will take pictures.  I have never noticed many bees on mine though, weird, maybe this year.  Have a wonderful day, beautiful day of this life.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
MrILoveTheAnts
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« Reply #22 on: September 06, 2007, 12:56:05 PM »

The ones there are called BlackJack. It's one of the ones with black/purple leaves. I have a green one too called Sedum spectabile or Autumn Joy but the bees aren't on it much. They were at the store though, I guess the bees just haven't found it yet.
Bumble bees were on it the second day I planted the thing. Various moths, flies, ants (Formica), butterflies, and other small bees were on it by day three. Honey bees were sort of on it the third day but it was just one and nothing else for the day. Day four and five it was covered in butterflies (the ones pictured above) with more and more honey bees coming every day. Between the two black ones there are almost always at least 4 honey bees on it. The autumn joy, however, has trouble even keeping the bumble bees on it.

I really like these plants, and they come in all sorts of shapes and forms. Some are moss like and crawl along the ground.
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« Reply #23 on: September 07, 2007, 12:50:47 AM »

MrILoveThe Ants.  Right, my is the Autumn Joy cultivar of the Sedum, narry a bee.  I have been out gathering seeds of the Fireweed and another that I don't know the name of, but I am doing an investigation.  Where I was gathering the seed is about 1 km from my home, across from the school that all the young children here go to.  I saw Italian and Carniolan bees on this forage, (not the fireweed, it is going to seed, but the other, not sure what it is yet, but was so covered in bees).  I am positive that this my girls, foraging, I have one Carniolan colony and several of the Italian.  Yes, it was a beautiful sight to see.  I will be identifying the enormous shrub that they were working so hard.  I took some cuttings of this subshrub (I think) and will see if it will be something that I can grow on my property.  I belong to a gardening forum and I will put the photo on this site soon.  Have a wonderful day, best of our beautiful life. Cindi

By the way, keep the pictures coming on, you are an excellent photographer.  C
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
MrILoveTheAnts
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« Reply #24 on: October 10, 2007, 03:16:43 PM »

Goldenrod, actually an unusually tall goldenrod. This one started growing with a butterfly bush I bought and I assumed it was part of the plant until it grew 7 feet tall. I thought it was just another weed but now I think I'd sooner get rid of the butterfly bush it came with. Wild goldenrod seems to only grow 4 feet tall. I wonder if this is a different species or if full sun, fertilizer, and proper watering have caused it to grow twice as big.


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Shawn
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« Reply #25 on: October 10, 2007, 05:55:56 PM »

Just recently planted cat nip and found bees onthem in a couple of days. Everyone has great pictures posted.
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MrILoveTheAnts
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« Reply #26 on: October 18, 2007, 08:28:20 PM »


Another pic of the goldenrod.
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Cindi
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« Reply #27 on: October 18, 2007, 10:21:00 PM »

MrILovetheAnts.  I meant to comment.  That fuzzy little bee in your first picture looks just like my cute little fuzzy fat Carniolan.  I wonder if they are relatives? 

Those are beauties of pictures that you have posted.  I love (and I mean love dearly) all the pictures of the bees that we get to see up close and personal, yeah!!!!!  Yeah!!!!  Have a wonderful and beautiful day on our planet Earth.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #28 on: October 19, 2007, 06:10:14 AM »

There is a variety of goldenrod calleld 'Fireworks' that's tall like that.  I've got a new planting of it out in the backyard by the bees.  I love goldenrod and let it come up wherever it wants to, within reason.
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MrILoveTheAnts
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« Reply #29 on: October 19, 2007, 01:58:19 PM »

I think I'm calling it quits with getting it ID'd. They seem to either grow as a long stalk or as a bush and besides that they all pretty much look the same. Flowers might look a little different on some. I looked up some species native to NJ and googled them. Depending on what garden site you go to they look different and have different height. There doesn't seem to be any standard.  Undecided
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« Reply #30 on: November 11, 2007, 10:38:18 AM »

this is just ice but it looks like flowers. it was taken in north louisiana. i think it is kind of rare to see this. i think it is from moist air coming out of the ground.








if you can explain this ice let us know
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Cindi
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« Reply #31 on: November 11, 2007, 02:58:37 PM »

Papabear.  Those are magnificent looking pictures, how on earth can the ice make such beautiful designs, I couldn't stop looking at the pictures.  I can't wait for someone who may know exactly how these were formed, I can bet your bottom dollar someone will have an excellent answer.  Have a wonderful and beautiful day, greatest of health to all.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #32 on: November 11, 2007, 03:16:44 PM »

this is just ice but it looks like flowers. it was taken in north louisiana. i think it is kind of rare to see this. i think it is from moist air coming out of the ground.

if you can explain this ice let us know


Papabear, I've posted your URLs in a binary weather newsgroup, I'll let you know what they say.  Fascinating photos!

Edited to add:  Papabear, they're called Frost Flowers.  Put that into Google and you'll get all sorts of links.  Here are a couple I found interesting:

Frost Flowers with explanation and pictures.

Frost Flowers in the Ozarks.

Frost Flowers in Texas.

They aren't formed by moisture coming up out of the ground, rather they're from water being 'pushed' out of a stem by freezing temperatures.  What an interesting find!
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Cindi
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« Reply #33 on: November 12, 2007, 09:49:47 AM »

Ann, beautiful research.  Upon perusing these sites, I remember that I have seen something like that at my place when we sometimes have deep freezing (rarely).  But what weird stuff I see usually comes on branches of certain small trees.  I will take note this year if we get some freeze and take pictures.  I think I could get some neat pics going on too. 

I loved those frost flowers, Nature's beauties.  Have a wonderful and beautiful day, greatest of health.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #34 on: November 25, 2007, 09:37:25 AM »

Thanks for the info
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« Reply #35 on: November 25, 2007, 01:20:50 PM »

great pictures. i have not seen any as pretty here, but i have similar.  it usually happens when we have had a lot of rain, or there are still green things out there.  then the hard freeze comes and, as cindi said, the moisture is pushed out and frozen.  i also get great ice sticking up out of the ground.  it looks like stalagmites in the dirt.  we have them this morning.
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

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« Reply #36 on: November 25, 2007, 11:05:06 PM »

Kathy, do you have a digital camera that you could show us some of your place/area, I would love to see those dirt icicles!!!!  Sounds so cool, beautiful day, great life.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #37 on: November 26, 2007, 01:27:03 PM »

could have done it this AM if i'd gotten this in time.  it was 26 degrees.  usually i bundle up and stagger out to the barn before light.  it's a bit of a hike and all i think about is getting back to the house for coffee  smiley.  i'll try to remember next cold snap. i think it's supposed to warm a bit and rain.
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
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« Reply #38 on: November 29, 2007, 12:50:11 PM »











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Cindi
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« Reply #39 on: November 30, 2007, 08:51:06 AM »

Egehan.  Wow, you got some really nice pictures going on there!!!!  That bee looks like she is having the time of her life, holy smokers!!!!  Beautiful day, beautiful life.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #40 on: November 30, 2007, 04:57:27 PM »

those look better than ice!!!!!  snow tonight!!!!
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
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