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Author Topic: Purslane  (Read 1960 times)

Offline MarkR

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Purslane
« on: May 15, 2007, 07:53:54 PM »
Would any of you kind people have purslane growing, either on purpose, or wild on the property, be willing to send me some seeds?  I'd be growing it in a contained are for feeding both the chickens and ourselves.

Mark

Offline mark

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Re: Purslane
« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2007, 09:35:37 PM »
wrong time of year for wild purslane mark.   check  seed catalogues  (territorial seed co. lists it  www.territorialseed.com) or your garden centers seeds

Offline MarkR

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Re: Purslane
« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2007, 10:10:18 PM »
Thanks mark,

Seeds are what I was looking for.  Great link! 

Mark

Offline Scadsobees

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Re: Purslane
« Reply #3 on: May 16, 2007, 09:12:06 AM »
Ugh...I could feed a whole flock of them over here.  No seeds, yet, althougth I'm sure that there are are billions just waiting in the first layer of soil.....
Rick

Offline MarkR

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Re: Purslane
« Reply #4 on: May 16, 2007, 06:15:56 PM »
Yeah, I know.  We had it all over creation when I was a kid.  But I'm having a real hankering.

Mark

Offline Cindi

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Re: Purslane
« Reply #5 on: June 22, 2007, 10:33:09 AM »
Purslane is one of the worst "weeds" that grows around my property.  It has not spread too far from where it originated and I cannot stand it.  I could never save seed for you because I pull out every speck of this nasty thing every time I see it.  One day it will be totally gone from my place.

Purslane, a.k.a. Portulaca olceara, or something like that, related to the pretty sunny portulaca plant that is so nice that I don't mind growing around here.  How can they be both so very different, eh

Purslane is a great delicacy for putting into salads.  In our big city, this is prized for a pretty salad green.  They can have it.  I can think of prettier, more tasty things to put in a salad.

Borage leaves are nice when they are cooked.  Kind of like spinach. Also the pretty blue flowers of borage are a beautiful salad addition.  I don't like the taste of the though, they taste kind of like fish oil to me.  But they certainly do look nice.  Have a wonderful day, great life.  Cindi
There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service

Offline MarkR

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Re: Purslane
« Reply #6 on: June 22, 2007, 08:52:48 PM »
Yes, well, er. . . I found the seeds.  And well, er, um. . . my better, smarter half said I had to keep it in a half barrel.   :roll:  Good thing, too.  I'll post some pictures when I get my camera back.  Very nice in a salad on a hot day that's for sure.

Mark

Offline reinbeau

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Re: Purslane
« Reply #7 on: June 22, 2007, 11:30:35 PM »
Eh, I've got it all over the place, I just pull it, if I'm watering at the time, I'll wash it off and eat it right in the garden!  :)  It's easy enough to get rid of, so it doesn't bother me.  It's actually a weed that grows in rich soil, it's indicative of good garden soil, so if you've got it, be proud!

- Ann, A Gardening Beek -  ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

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Offline Cindi

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Re: Purslane
« Reply #8 on: June 23, 2007, 02:57:43 AM »
Ann, oh dear.  Not the purslane that grows around my property.  I have a very sandy driveway that goes from the front of my property to the back.  The previous owner (17 years ago), ran a oil delivery truck and had a wonderful driveway and huge "parking" area for his trucks (I surely hope after 17 years that if there was any oil spillage, that is long gone by the wayside now).  Our driveway is for the entranceway blacktop, the remainder deeply set road bed, somewhat after so many years, similar to hard cement.  This damnable purslane even grows in the sandy, hard packed road bed (road mulch), whatever it may be called.  It does grow anywhere.  But yes, on the other hand, it does love the sweet soil of years and years of compost and animal manures.

The prior owner (17 long years ago) kept many, many rabbits.  I think that she bred them or something like that.  The barns that we removed when we moved in were very short, barely short for my 5 foot 2 inches tall stature to walk underneath.  This soil where she had her rabbit barns is so fertile, always has been.  Rabbit manures are wonderful, as are the horses.  This area where her rabbits were kept was the place,  that when we had horses (our daughters') we dumped the tons of food that came from the rear end of these beasts.  It is fertile beyond the imagination of the mind.  And yes, the purslane loves to grow there too.  Yes, so much about purslane.  I must eat it in the field instead of taking the time to put it into a bucket. Yum, yum.  Have a wonderful day, best of this life.  Cindi
There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service