Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
October 01, 2014, 10:15:53 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: ATTENTION ALL NEW MEMBERS
PLEASE READ THIS OR YOUR ACCOUNT MAY BE DELETED - CLICK HERE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: 1 2 [All]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Birds  (Read 6663 times)
doak
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1788

Location: Central Ga. 35 miles north of Macon


« on: May 20, 2007, 09:19:26 PM »

Anyone having trouble with birds getting their bees?
How do I stop it? I tried a rubber snake in the water trough. They don't pay it any attention.
doak
Logged
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13694


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #1 on: May 20, 2007, 09:31:01 PM »

I have not had trouble with birds.
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Understudy
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 4640


Location: West Palm Beach, Fl


WWW
« Reply #2 on: May 20, 2007, 09:33:46 PM »

I have a few small problems with birds. not enough to really warrant any action but every now and then I will catch a bird going after the free buffet he sees. I tend to look at it as nature in action. I have a bigger problem with spiders. The spiders set up webs on the final approach path. I must be the only person who has spiders that need Jenny Craig.

Sincerely,
Brendhan
Logged

The status is not quo. The world is a mess and I just need to rule it. Dr. Horrible
doak
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1788

Location: Central Ga. 35 miles north of Macon


« Reply #3 on: May 20, 2007, 11:57:23 PM »

These birds come right to the entrance.
The spiders don't have a chance, I have my colonies in my back yard and I take what I call "the bee walk" 3 or 4 times a day. I also carry a stick, to rake anything off the landing deck that doesn't belong there.
doak
Logged
abejaruco
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 598

Location: cadiz


« Reply #4 on: May 21, 2007, 01:06:26 AM »

I have swallows, in the hives located near populated areas, and "bee eaters" everywhere.  I can´t kill them. I have increased the number of hives.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_Bee-eater
Logged
Mici
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1502


Location: Zagradec, Grosuple, Lower Carniola, Slovenia

tougher than rock


WWW
« Reply #5 on: May 21, 2007, 05:08:51 AM »

i have swallows too, but i think they don't pick too many bees, there's plenty of other insects, but anyway, swallows are good
but sparrows...oh dear, they come by in the afternoon, round two to three o'clock and they're just pickin' those bees up! loads and loads of bees, but from my observations, i'm almost sure they're picking up only drones, most of which can't fly. but, sparrows eat only grains and stuff, so i'm pretty sure this is for the young ones.
i think shooting with an airgun only in their proximity would get them away for a longer period of time but hell..let them pick those drones.
Logged
doak
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1788

Location: Central Ga. 35 miles north of Macon


« Reply #6 on: May 21, 2007, 12:03:23 PM »

Red birds and brown thrashers. I can't tell what they are catching. They come when the bees are doing their orientation flights.
doak
Logged
RiceLake
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 8

Location: Ontario, Canada


« Reply #7 on: May 21, 2007, 09:27:25 PM »

Last year we had a bird problem also.
I put up an owl decoy on top of a post beside the hives. It seems to have worked.
We did not see any birds catching bees at the hives anymore.


Logged
doak
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1788

Location: Central Ga. 35 miles north of Macon


« Reply #8 on: May 23, 2007, 10:58:57 PM »

I couldn't findany string to hang the owls yesterday so I set them on a cement block.
noticed the one bird would come up on the blind side and creep around the hive. Grab a bee and scoot.
This afternoon I found some string and got the owls  "just-a-swining" from a limb. they are above the tallest hive now. It was late but I didn't see any birds up close to the hives.
I'll keep y'all posted.
doak
Logged
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #9 on: May 24, 2007, 12:42:47 AM »

Doak.  Good.  I think it is dreadful that any bees should be lost to predators, there are so many more insects that we could certainly be rid of, leave our bees alone.  Great day, Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
BEE C
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 329


Location: British Columbia, Canada


« Reply #10 on: May 24, 2007, 01:48:20 AM »

Put up owl roosting boxes and lure those sweet little killers to roost in your yard...worked for me.  I noticed out of the corner of my eye today there is a bald eagle at the tree tops.  The birds just melted away into the forest.
Logged
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #11 on: May 24, 2007, 08:55:30 AM »

Bee C, nice picture, looks like the owl was blinking (LOL).  Did you you some kind of night shot camera or just a camera with flash?  He looks dazzled.  You will have to tell about how many roosting boxes you have at your place.  Have a wonderful day, great life, good health.  Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Understudy
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 4640


Location: West Palm Beach, Fl


WWW
« Reply #12 on: May 24, 2007, 10:15:01 PM »




Sorry, it couldn't be helped.

 grin


Sincerely,
Brendhan
Logged

The status is not quo. The world is a mess and I just need to rule it. Dr. Horrible
Brian D. Bray
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 7369


Location: Anacortes, WA 98221

I really look like this, just ask Cindi.


WWW
« Reply #13 on: May 24, 2007, 11:44:18 PM »

Preditory birds are a major problem for me.  I had a sharpshin hawk who decided he liked pigeon, racing pigeons to be exact.  Got to the point I was down to 4 birds.  Then the hawk decided to follow the pigeons through the traps and into the loft where it dinned on 2 more.  I was down to my last pair.  The Hawk, BTW, is no longer a nuance to my neighborhood.  I am now slowly building my bird population back up--have 5 now. 
Just had a banty hen hatch the only egg she was sitting one but I don't want to loose the chick to hawks.

In my area we have Bald eagles, Ospreys, Goshawks, Pereguin falcons, sharpshins, Red Tailed hawks, Sparrow hawks (which prey on bees and flying insects), Coopers hawks, several other variety of hawks as well as vultures, and several types of owls.  I can hardly go outside without seeing a bird of prey.

The only birds that dine on the flying bees are the Sparrow hawks and once in awhile the barn swallows.  The swallows, most of the time, fly near the water retention pond for the development next door scooping up misquitoes.  Since I'm the only one in the neighborhood who still has a barn I get to host the swallows.

I must admit thought that the crows and ravens do a fairly good job of harassing and keeping the larger birds of prey far enough away that they don't bother my birds too much.
Logged

Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
doak
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1788

Location: Central Ga. 35 miles north of Macon


« Reply #14 on: May 25, 2007, 12:03:33 AM »

Brain D. Bray,
I have just about everything you named, except the bald Eagle. They're down the road about 12 miles. I do have Golden Eagles.
The guys messing with my bees is red bird and the Brown Thrasher, our "STATE BIRD".
The resin owls are not keeping them out. One day was all it took for them to find they're not the real thing.
I'm not going to loose any sleep over it.
May try my critter gitter and see if that works. Or some red ribbon. Don't want to use blue or white
doak
Logged
Mici
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1502


Location: Zagradec, Grosuple, Lower Carniola, Slovenia

tougher than rock


WWW
« Reply #15 on: May 31, 2007, 08:54:34 AM »

ok..they've crossed the line. saw a bird more than 2 times standing on the entrance. time for airgun!
Logged
MarkF
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 30


Location: Woodstock, NB, Canada


« Reply #16 on: April 24, 2008, 07:04:06 PM »

Someone needs to make an Owl decoy with a bobble head that the wind will move, the movement will keep the birds from figuring out it not real. I think it would work much better than a fixed statue.
Logged

Sting me once shame on you!
Sting me twice I guess I should have learned faster!
annette
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 5314


Location: Placerville, California


« Reply #17 on: April 24, 2008, 11:10:13 PM »

I believe Home Depot has something like that.
Logged
Bochekokik
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 13

Location: Philippines


« Reply #18 on: January 25, 2009, 07:19:43 AM »

Folks, Sorry if I have to revive this thread.
We have problems with birds feasting on the bees especially during foraging. Several suggestions were made, some were possible to do, some were illegal to do. The birds Im refering to is the Philippine swift (black with white streak thru the body). When the birds attack, the colony size drops, mostly the nurse bees are left.
Here are some of the thing that was done
1. Use a gun to shoot the birds -> cannot be done. There is a subdivision beside our place and the action of shooting those birds would give me a one way ticket to jail
2. Use a decoy -> wont work for far foraging areas. And the birds seems smart enough to know after a couple of days that it is only a decoy and they again continue feasting.
3. Use the real live predatory bird like eagles and owls-> sad to say these predatory birds are already on the endangered species list. Local laws will not allow us to keep or use these birds. These predatory birds are confined only to restricted wildlife areas.

Some folks suggest that we use poision, but as much as possible we want to search for an environmentally friendly way to controlling those birds. Appreciate if anybody can give additional suggestions.

Thanks in advance
Logged
Irwin
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2343


Location: Lakeside OR

howdy all


« Reply #19 on: January 25, 2009, 08:16:47 AM »

Folks, Sorry if I have to revive this thread.
We have problems with birds feasting on the bees especially during foraging. Several suggestions were made, some were possible to do, some were illegal to do. The birds Im refering to is the Philippine swift (black with white streak thru the body). When the birds attack, the colony size drops, mostly the nurse bees are left.
Here are some of the thing that was done
1. Use a gun to shoot the birds -> cannot be done. There is a subdivision beside our place and the action of shooting those birds would give me a one way ticket to jail
2. Use a decoy -> wont work for far foraging areas. And the birds seems smart enough to know after a couple of days that it is only a decoy and they again continue feasting.
3. Use the real live predatory bird like eagles and owls-> sad to say these predatory birds are already on the endangered species list. Local laws will not allow us to keep or use these birds. These predatory birds are confined only to restricted wildlife areas.

Some folks suggest that we use poision, but as much as possible we want to search for an environmentally friendly way to controlling those birds. Appreciate if anybody can give additional suggestions.

Thanks in advance
What about a air gun they are quiet that's what I use
Logged

Fight organized crime!  Re-elect no one.
JP
The Swarm King
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 11683


Location: Metairie, Louisiana

I like doing cut-outs, but I love catching swarms!


WWW
« Reply #20 on: January 25, 2009, 10:32:15 AM »

Would these same birds eat seeds? What about putting seeds out nearbye to lure them and feed them so they're not inclined to eat as many bees?


...JP
Logged

"Good friends are as sweet as honey" Winne the Pooh

My pictures can be viewed at http://picasaweb.google.com/pyxicephalus
and
http://picasaweb.google.com/112138792165178452970

My Youtube videos can be viewed here: http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=JPthebeeman&aq=f

My website JPthebeeman.com http://www.jpthebeeman.com/jpthebeeman/
beemaster
Site Founder
Administrator
Galactic Bee
*******
Online Online

Gender: Male
Posts: 6245


Location: Manchester, NJ

It is my pleasure to bring the forums to you.


WWW
« Reply #21 on: January 25, 2009, 11:52:04 AM »

It must be a different post I posted too - but HERE I have Sandpiper Birds who follow the dying older workers walking away from the hive for the last time. The sandpipers only eat the older workers leaving the younger females alone. They leave the young healthy bees alone - only eating the dying ones - a great asset for the beekeeper.

Logged

NJBeemaster my YOUTUBE Video Collection
Follow us on TWITTER
SKYPE NJBeemaster - include your FORUM NAME in contact request
My Personal FACEBOOK Page


"All donations to our forums are greatly appreciated"
Please click HERE to help support our forum.
poka-bee
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1651


Location: buckley wa

I am NEVER bored!!


WWW
« Reply #22 on: January 25, 2009, 06:41:47 PM »

Most birds eat bugs during nesting, the chicks need the protein to grow fast & leave the nest. Some birds like swallows & swifts (I think) only eat bugs.  If you have a decoy type thing you have to move it every day or so & have a couple of different looking ones. Best thing is to have a dog that loves to chase birds!  Cats are good too but are not easily visable as they are sneaky...J
Logged

I'm covered in Beeesssss!  Eddie Izzard
Bochekokik
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 13

Location: Philippines


« Reply #23 on: January 25, 2009, 09:52:01 PM »

What about a air gun they are quiet that's what I use

Hello Sir, for our situation, its dangerous using a gun of any kind in our place since there is a populated area near the place. If somebody get shot from whatever gun, chances are the blame would be on me.
The nearby foraging areas are free of birds since there are several decoys placed around it, plus my labrador is helping me chase away those birds. The big problem is the far foraging areas. I cant go to that place since I have to passby several private properties.
We also tried using seeds but the birds seems to prefer the bees.
Logged
mudlake
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 55

Location: Upstate New York


« Reply #24 on: January 28, 2009, 05:26:33 PM »

I live on lake Ontairo so we have "birds" or as some like to call them flying Rats, sea gulls. If you can streach fishing string the clear kind, across the yard above head height . The birds run into these a few times and it scares them off. They won't leave the area but they won't like going below the string. You might have to run a few so they get the idea. Good Luck  Tony   
Logged
DayValleyDahlias
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1629


Location: Aptos, California


WWW
« Reply #25 on: January 28, 2009, 05:33:55 PM »

There are more bees than the birds can eat...Please don't shoot the birds.  It is kinda like people who place their prized goats in an area where mountain lions lives out here, then get upset when the lion kills a goat, and goes out and kills the dang lion...that increases the deer population for us...There will be a balance.

I was worried last year when blue jays were sitting outside my one hive, enjoying bees...they didn't even make a dent in the population.  The birds are beneficial. they will eat harmful bugs as well...

Try a scarecrow before killing the birdies...

Thank you and amen...

Sharon

 
Logged


<img src="[url]http://banners.wunderground.com/weathersticker/miniWeather2_both_cond/language/www/US/CA/Aptos.gif
" border=0
alt="Click for Aptos, California Forecast" height=50 width=150>[/url]

"Become vegetarian/vegan, and no one gets hurt"
poka-bee
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1651


Location: buckley wa

I am NEVER bored!!


WWW
« Reply #26 on: January 28, 2009, 05:55:49 PM »

Tony, that is a great idea & works for a variety of birds.  They do that at the salmon hatcheries around here & I know people that have done it in their yard for their koi ponds. Once Blue Heron find your pond your fish are toast. We have Osprey here also.  Luckily I built my pond with that in mind, the shallows are very limited & the pond goes straight down to around 34". We have Stellar Jays & I have never seen them bother the bees.  J
Logged

I'm covered in Beeesssss!  Eddie Izzard
Bochekokik
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 13

Location: Philippines


« Reply #27 on: January 28, 2009, 08:55:19 PM »

There are more bees than the birds can eat...Please don't shoot the birds.  It is kinda like people who place their prized goats in an area where mountain lions lives out here, then get upset when the lion kills a goat, and goes out and kills the dang lion...that increases the deer population for us...There will be a balance.

I was worried last year when blue jays were sitting outside my one hive, enjoying bees...they didn't even make a dent in the population.  The birds are beneficial. they will eat harmful bugs as well...

Try a scarecrow before killing the birdies...

Thank you and amen...

Sharon

I totally agree with you Mam Sharon. That is why I want to use environmentally friendly ways to protect our hives and at the same time just scare (not kill) the birds.
One of the method we are doing is making sure that the colony is strong so even if the birds would feast on the bees, the hive is still strong. Placed several scarecrows/decoys as well. Hope this works, since its difficult to intervene with the balance of nature.
Thanks for the info.
Logged
Ted n Ms
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 35

Location: west point ms


« Reply #28 on: April 11, 2009, 11:54:08 PM »

My bees were realy brooding up until a colony of purple martins moved in. My bees went to rock bottom.I would not what martins know where near a queen mating yard. Got to do something about them.
Logged

You can't hoot with the owls and soar with eagles!!
charlotte
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 140


Location: WI


« Reply #29 on: May 28, 2009, 03:20:45 PM »

We have barn cats...   I have actually seen the cats hanging out right between the hives waiting for a meal.  The bees don't seem to care that the cats are there.  That way I don't have to worry about the birds.  The cats do it for me.  Balance...  Nature...  Fat cats....  Environmentally friendly too....

p.s. I actually love seeing wild birds.  In fact I feed them year round by the house.  Figure the population increase of birds, due to feeding, evens out when my barn cats catch a few for lunch out by the hives grin
Logged

Sleep is overrated!
BoBn
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 195

Location: USA


WWW
« Reply #30 on: May 29, 2009, 08:49:36 AM »

I have a pair of Phoebes that nest in the rafters of my wood shed 5 feet above some of my hives.  They sometimes catch flying bees, but I figure that they "earn their keep" in helping to control blackflies.
Logged

"Millions of innocent men, women, and children, since the introduction of Christianity, have been burnt, tortured, fined, and imprisoned; yet we have not advanced one inch toward uniformity. What has been the effect of coercion? To make one-half the world fools and the other half hypocrites."
--Thomas Jefferson
Pages: 1 2 [All]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.478 seconds with 21 queries.

Google visited last this page September 08, 2014, 07:00:43 PM
anything