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Author Topic: How to.... Make an alighting board  (Read 6410 times)
asleitch
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« on: June 21, 2004, 02:56:36 PM »

Due to using the UK standard hive a "National" - they don't have an alighting board. I'd made some, but then injured my back, so much that I had to recouperate at home.

My back is on the mend, and although not fit to be lifting and carrying and moving timber about, I decided I was fit to wield a spray can, on a tuit that's been around rolleyes for ages. (a tuit, is known as a get-around-"tu-it" - and hence is always round  rolleyes  wink )

The floor of beehives is a wire mesh, with a metal edge, and I'd noticed months ago the bees were slipping as they tried to enter the hive.



This kind of shows it - the enterance is about 1/3 of the way up, and they have to land, and climb in without a foothold. I've since modified my hive stands to be wider, so their is a ledge - but I've watched some with proper alighting boards and they defiantely seem to prefer it. Besides nothings too much for the ladies is it?



I'd made up some "alighting" boards, along time ago, but hadn't put them into use as I couldn't be bothered to prime and gloss them.

Over a couple of days, with a few rests inbetween, I first primed



Then glossed the boards. This worked well with my back injury as I was trying to avoid sitting. I was either to be lying down, or up and walking about every 20 minutes. I was able to paint a couple, then go for a lie down.



I printed a few sheets on the printer in size 200 text, then carefully used a scalpel to cut out the template



Then used a spray can, to give each a number (Colony 1, Colony 2 etc)



A top coat of laquer to seal the numbering



To reduce surface tension when it's raining, and to improve traction, a good quantity of sand round the edges, and sived over the top provides an ideal surface.



Just a case of screwing them to the hive now. I got the go-ahead from the Physio today to resume some "normal" but non-weight bearing or sporting activities, so thought I'd visit the apiary to screw them on



I'm having two beehives delivered by a colleague from work (I'm not allowed to carry them yet) so screwed them to two empty stands.



The bees aren't used to landing on them yet, it'll take a day or two before they realise they can just belly-flop onto them and then walk in.



Those two unused stands which are waiting for a couple of swarms, that people have collected on my behalf. Swarm in tree....



Swarm in beehive



And finally, because I've been unable to collect them due to the weight.....A friend has been looking after them in his garden. (The two on the left) you can see another method of alighting board on his stand



And finally, it's not unusual for beekeepers to keep their bees on an out-apiary on a local farm in the UK, but mine share with some rather unusual feathered friends (for a UK farm anyway).

I have to admit, I keep well back cos they nip your fingers.



Safely the other side of that fence  cheesy



Adam
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BigRog
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« Reply #1 on: June 21, 2004, 07:03:54 PM »

Nice work
and great pics, they make it easy to understand exactly whats going on.



 cheesy Good thing your bees can read, so the find the right hive cheesy
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Beth Kirkley
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« Reply #2 on: June 21, 2004, 07:23:58 PM »

That's a good idea you had. Smiley

And I have to ask.  smiley  What is a tuit? Is it some sort of chair that rolls? That's what came to mind - is a round seated chair on wheels.

Beth Smiley
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asleitch
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« Reply #3 on: June 22, 2004, 04:41:54 AM »

A tuit - is a job or task you are always mean to do, but never get around to-it. or Tuit in its streamlined form.

Everybody has a few Tuits, and only rarely to you find you can reduce the number of Tuits, as for each Tuit you complete a new Tuit takes it place.

E.g. I noticed I need to strim the grass around the hive, which is a new Tuit, to replace the alighting boards with are an old "tuit".

Becuase you never get around to-it, Tuits are always considered to be round.

Does that make any sense?
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Beth Kirkley
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« Reply #4 on: June 22, 2004, 11:31:03 AM »

I got it now! LOL That's cute. Smiley

Beth
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asleitch
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« Reply #5 on: June 22, 2004, 12:06:49 PM »

Try googling TUIT, it throws up some interesting links.



Adam
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1frozenhillbilly
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« Reply #6 on: December 22, 2004, 03:46:27 PM »

I have a question.  from looking at your pics it appears that that new hive is made of cedar?  I have always used cedar to make clothing storage boxes because of the fact that cedar is resistant to moths which can destroy fabrics.  
1: does this insecticide property affect the bees?
2: would it help in reducing wax moth?
3: would it help reduce mites?

I realize that there are several kinds of cedar and some are not so insecticidal but the hive is beautiful.
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Jay
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« Reply #7 on: December 22, 2004, 05:54:13 PM »

Fantastic pics!!  I like how you combined the landing boards with the labeling process. Since your labels are not on your hive boxes, if you ever want to exchange boxes with different hives, you don't have to keep track of which colony is in which box as long as you place them on the right stand once you've exchanged them. Does that make sense, or only in my poor little mind?
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asleitch
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« Reply #8 on: December 23, 2004, 03:29:45 AM »

Quote from: Jay
Fantastic pics!!  I like how you combined the landing boards with the labeling process. Since your labels are not on your hive boxes, if you ever want to exchange boxes with different hives, you don't have to keep track of which colony is in which box as long as you place them on the right stand once you've exchanged them. Does that make sense, or only in my poor little mind?


I have lots of options, I can change the hive without moving the base, or I can take the base with the hive, or I can unscrew the board and move it independently.

Seem to work for me.  Cheesy

Adam
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TwT
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« Reply #9 on: December 23, 2004, 03:49:04 AM »

nice looking hives and stands , and great pic's
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SilverFox
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« Reply #10 on: December 23, 2004, 03:25:55 PM »

1frozenhillbilly:  One of the nice things about CEDER is that it seldoms needs any type of weather-proofing.  Most destructive insects don' like them and it doesn't appear to deter the bees in any way.
If you go to the extent of finishing the out side w/a finish they'll look great useing linseed oil or a clear varnish (exterior of course).
Possiably keeping wax moths out.
My hives are made from old pallets, scraps and once in a while purchesed lumber, treat them all w/linseed oil.  Have fun and be creative.
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1frozenhillbilly
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« Reply #11 on: December 23, 2004, 09:41:27 PM »

thx silverfox.  I may look into pallets we sometimes get low grade cypress pallets at the brewpub i work in. those would make real pretty wood if you can get the nails out without splitting it.
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ummsahlah
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« Reply #12 on: May 02, 2006, 06:09:52 PM »

Hi,
I'm new to bees and beekeeping and I am only a researcher for now. I am gathering more information on bees and their behaviour.
This forum seems great..plus I like the pics and i think I could use some of them on my posts..
I wanted to ask if its ok to use the natural beehive picture in the post by adam.

thank you so much

ummsahlah
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #13 on: May 12, 2006, 12:10:18 PM »

A smart beekeeper is a good scavenger.
At the price of equipment these days one must be thrifty and making my own equipment helps me putter the time away.  Being in a wheelchair means I can't do everything but I can use my hands.
  I just had the stairs of the house I'm moving into rebuilt (I inherited the house and 1 1/3 acre--thanks) and the steps were all cedar--the risers were the problem.  I figure I'll get a full hive out of the deal at least 5 shallow 8 frame boxes.  Size being a prime consideration for me.
When I 1st started back in 1959 there was a local beekeeper who built bee equipment--he would only use cedar.  My guess is that the person I sold my hives to when I went into the Army in 68, or his successor, is still using them.  It takes a 1000 years for a Western Red Cedar to rot away.
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