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Author Topic: "Wort" plants  (Read 3969 times)
Cindi
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« on: May 16, 2007, 09:46:41 AM »

Did you know?  Trivia -- that the suffix "wort" on the end of the plant name signifies that it has medicinal purposes?  I have done research on plants that are particularly attractive to bees and it appears that many of the "wort" plants are highly attractive.  Many of these are perennials, so I have been setting these seeds in my greenhouse and am now in the process of planting these grown plants outside.  I do not know if they will set flowers this year, becauses they are of a perennial nature, but next year, watch out!!!!

Figwort (Scrophularia nodosa
Motherwort Leonarus cardiaca

Cerinthe Cerinthe major, member of the borage family, cousin to Comfrey and Borage Officinalis
Lions's Ear Lionitis leonurus
Teasel Dipsacus sativus
Agrostemma purple queen
Sea Holly
Catnip
Lemon Balm
Spearmint
Anise Hyssop (two cultivars)

The list of bee plants goes on and on, but these are ones that have been greenhouse propogated.  Later in the year when these plants bloom, I will post pictures.  The Lion's Ear looks like it is a very interesting flower and I can't wait for it to bloom.  Have a wonderful day, great day, great health.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Shizzell
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« Reply #1 on: May 16, 2007, 12:38:06 PM »

Wow Cindi, didn't know that. Maybe your bees when they start to pollinate these medicinal plants and become...SUPER BEES!

I have a right to dream, I think.

 tongue

Jake
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reinbeau
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« Reply #2 on: May 16, 2007, 08:45:32 PM »

Did you know?  Trivia -- that the suffix "wort" on the end of the plant name signifies that it has medicinal purposes?  I have done research on plants that are particularly attractive to bees and it appears that many of the "wort" plants are highly attractive.  Many of these are perennials, so I have been setting these seeds in my greenhouse and am now in the process of planting these grown plants outside.  I do not know if they will set flowers this year, becauses they are of a perennial nature, but next year, watch out!!!!
Many of our culinary and medicinal herbs are great bee plants, as I found out when I was researching this topic for the plant sale last Saturday.  I sat at a table with a bee display suggesting good plants for bees.

Quote
Figwort (Scrophularia nodosa
Motherwort Leonarus cardiaca

Cerinthe Cerinthe major, member of the borage family, cousin to Comfrey and Borage Officinalis
Lions's Ear Lionitis leonurus
Teasel Dipsacus sativus
Agrostemma purple queen
Sea Holly
Catnip
Lemon Balm
Spearmint
Anise Hyssop (two cultivars)

The list of bee plants goes on and on, but these are ones that have been greenhouse propogated.  Later in the year when these plants bloom, I will post pictures.  The Lion's Ear looks like it is a very interesting flower and I can't wait for it to bloom.  Have a wonderful day, great day, great health.  Cindi
Remember the listing we made up of good bee plants?  I used it at the sale. 

Lemon Balm (Melissa officinalis) is the herb of the year this year for the Herb Society of America.  We sold tons of it - and those who bought it will have lots, it's very prolific (although easy to control).  Great bee forage plant and reputed to be a swarm lure.

And Shizzell, I don't know about super bees, but herbal honey is to die for!  I love it.  I was so thrilled when our honey tasted just like my parents did - my mother is an herbalist, I've followed in her footsteps into gardening and have lots of herbs myself (although I'll never have the knowledge of them she has).
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- Ann, A Gardening Beek -  ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

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Cindi
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« Reply #3 on: May 17, 2007, 09:58:18 AM »

Ann, yes, I remember our list, it was a wonderful list and isn't it fantastic that you could use it as a learning tool at your event?!!!  Yeah, good for you!!!!!  I moved my four lemonbalm plants this spring (and split them up into about 4 each, which made 16 new plants and gave a bunch to my oldest gal).  I could not believe the size of the rootball.  The plant was say 18 inches across, the the rootball was probably double that width and about the same 18 inches deep, I was astounded.  It is definitely not invasive.  I think I made a mistake last year with planting a spearment plant in a particular spot (I had grown it in the greenhouse by seed).  This year the plant has probably grown about 10 fold.  It is obviously so invasive, I must dig it up (not likely at all to get all the underground roots, I know that) and put it into a large container.  I knew that it would become invasive, but I didn't realize it could possibly have grown that much in one year in my wildest dreams!!!!  I don't think I would even want to find a place on my property to let it grow wild, it scares me the growth above ground, I cannot imagine what it is doing below ground!!!!!  EEEKS!!!!!

It is funny how we sometimes follow in our mother's footsteps, you are fortunate that your Mother is involved in the herbalist, you can glean information from her until the cows come home.  I know that she would answer any question that you would ever ask her.  Yeah!!!!  You have a wealth that not many of us could ever imagine to hold in our hands.   My oldest daugher, the one that used to be the prissiest thing that you could ever imagine as a teenager and a young woman, now is almost the same as me.  Au naturel....She gardens, looks for bugs, events horses, loves to ride in the bushes, raises farm animals.  She was assimilated!!!!  Gotta laugh.  She still has her prissy moments, but she is mostly farm girl now, you can't take that country out of the girl and I am so proud of her.  She tells me all the time in her e-mails how much she has become like her mother and how proud she is of herself and her endeavours and loves to listen to my advice (imagine that, 20 years ago she would have told me to stick it where the sun don't shine, LOL&L).

Ann, it sounds like you are very involved with the Society, good for you.  That is an interesting aspect of your life, and I would love to hear more.  Where do you find the time for your bees, gardens and then to go onto the events that you attend, my hat off to you, girl.  Have a wonderful day, beautiful life and great health.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Shizzell
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« Reply #4 on: May 17, 2007, 12:37:52 PM »

Cindi, keep that spearmint though, its GREAT for bee sting itches

Cheesy

Jake
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Cindi
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« Reply #5 on: May 18, 2007, 08:53:35 AM »

Jake, OK, great, that is good, another possible treatment at hand for bee sting stuff.  I am not going to get rid of that plant of beauty, just going to control it (if it is now possible).  Have a wonderful day, great health.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Shizzell
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« Reply #6 on: May 18, 2007, 01:01:36 PM »

Yah, I had some spearmint in a bunch of my hostas, that was not a good idea.

Jake
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doak
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« Reply #7 on: May 18, 2007, 04:36:58 PM »

Whatch out for the catnip. It grows very and looks like every seed comes up. I have lots of it. and am trying to get my speerment started back. My elephant garlic is taking the drout hard.
This is what I was talking about on the other thread and was misunderstood. I wasn't thinking of using the leaves for smoke fuel.
I read some where that Honey bees benefit from a lot of herbs.
That was my point, hope everybody understands what I was trying to get across.
Never was much at writing anyway.
doak
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reinbeau
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« Reply #8 on: May 18, 2007, 05:31:02 PM »

Doak, many of the herbs supply our bees with great nectar, and as a result they make great tasting honey!
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- Ann, A Gardening Beek -  ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

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doak
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« Reply #9 on: May 18, 2007, 05:40:52 PM »

May not be the right place. But while we're on taste, does anyone know what makes a "nutty" flavor honey.
I have Pecan, hickory nut, black walnut.
doak
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Cindi
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« Reply #10 on: May 18, 2007, 10:47:01 PM »

Doak, well I can thank the good green earth then about catnip reseeding.  I cut off all the flowers last year in hope that it would prolong the blooming period.  Unlike many plants, it did not.  So, I don't think that I will have catnip appearing around.  The bees did indeed enjoy this plant for sure.  I save many many seeds, and probably will spread a few around in a few select areas.  I do not have cats, but I brought some up to my oldest daughter and her cats really enjoyed the leaves.  I find it rather awful smelling personally though.  Have a wonderful day, great life, great health.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #11 on: May 19, 2007, 09:51:13 AM »

May not be the right place. But while we're on taste, does anyone know what makes a "nutty" flavor honey.
I have Pecan, hickory nut, black walnut.
doak

Don't know if you have this obnoxious take over everything weed in your area but some people say that Japanese Knotweed honey has a slight Walnut flavor to it. Darn stuff is taking over all the stream banks around here and it's very difficult to get rid of once it gets established.
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Cindi
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« Reply #12 on: May 19, 2007, 11:18:14 AM »

Romanhawk.  Ya, I have heard about that.  It is indeed considered a noxious weed.  It is not good for sure.  BUT..the only saving grace about it is that the bees love the flowers and does produce copious amounts of nectar, go figure eh?  Best of a beautiful day, great life and health.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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