Welcome, Guest

Author Topic: Feeding honey back to the hive  (Read 3295 times)

Offline Blackbird

  • House Bee
  • **
  • Posts: 126
Feeding honey back to the hive
« on: June 19, 2004, 07:20:18 PM »
I just did a major over haul on one of my brood chambers. I got a bad start with only 9 frames and had a lot of burr  comb and generally a very difficult to inspect situation.
Any way after letting the bees that were there hatch out I went in to cut off the excess comb. In doing this I ended up with a couple of pounds of honey. I had not intended to take any honey this year as this is a new package hived in April and I assume the bees will need all they harvest this year  for the winter. I know two pounds or so isn't that much honey but it might be to the bees.
So my question is what is the best way to get this honey back to the bees?

Thanks
Stacie

Offline Robo

  • Technical
  • Administrator
  • Galactic Bee
  • *******
  • Posts: 6492
  • Gender: Male
  • Beekeep On!
    • Robo's World
Feeding honey back to the hive
« Reply #1 on: June 19, 2004, 07:50:58 PM »
Take the burr comb you cut off that has the honey in it, and place it on top of the inner cover.  Then put an empty super on top of the inner cover, followed by the top cover.  The bees will clean the honey out of the burr comb and move it down into the hive.
"Opportunity is missed by most people because it comes dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison



Offline Blackbird

  • House Bee
  • **
  • Posts: 126
Feeding honey back to the hive
« Reply #2 on: June 19, 2004, 11:05:23 PM »
Oops..... What if I already "extracted" the honey from the burrr comb?

I had a thought of putting the honey undiluted in my intrance feeder. Think that'd work??
Any other ideas?

Offline Robo

  • Technical
  • Administrator
  • Galactic Bee
  • *******
  • Posts: 6492
  • Gender: Male
  • Beekeep On!
    • Robo's World
Feeding honey back to the hive
« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2004, 11:13:12 PM »
Definately do not dilute it.  If you add water,  it will then ferment if it is not all taken quickly.

I don't like entrance feeders, but if you do,  be careful to watch for robbing.
"Opportunity is missed by most people because it comes dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison



Offline Beth Kirkley

  • House Bee
  • **
  • Posts: 103
    • http://www.petfinder.org/shelters/GA216.html
Feeding honey back to the hive
« Reply #4 on: June 19, 2004, 11:36:04 PM »
I was wondering. Why does honey ferment, but not sugar water? is it the fructose?

Beth

Offline Agility Mom

  • House Bee
  • **
  • Posts: 160
Feeding honey back to the hive
« Reply #5 on: June 24, 2004, 11:07:47 PM »
Sugar water does ferment which is why, if you feed hummingbirds, you have to change it regularly or it will make them sick - so I have read. When it is cool out, I am sure that it ferments more slowly. I am feeding a swarm I captured, also, and they seem to go through it so fast it doesn't have time to ferment.
Judy

Offline steve

  • House Bee
  • **
  • Posts: 62
Feeding honey back to the hive
« Reply #6 on: June 25, 2004, 07:32:29 AM »
Beth, honey will start to ferment within 24 to 48 hours after you add water
 due to the wild yeasts that are always present in the honey......that's why you never bottle (extract) honey until it's fully capped or below 18% moisture......the bees know........
 Putting honey in an outside feeder is diffently and open invite to rob!!!
                                                      Steve

Offline Blackbird

  • House Bee
  • **
  • Posts: 126
Feeding honey back to the hive
« Reply #7 on: June 25, 2004, 08:52:54 AM »
I was sucessful with the outside feeder. They took up that honey in about three days.
I only have one hive so there isn't a hive near by that could come and steal. I saw no evidence of robbing. My hive is pretty strong in numbers, it probably wouldn't be a good idea with a weaker hive.
Stacie