Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
August 30, 2014, 04:29:00 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: ATTENTION ALL NEW MEMBERS
PLEASE READ THIS OR YOUR ACCOUNT MAY BE DELETED - CLICK HERE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Would you check out these photos  (Read 1770 times)
Bee1
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 81

Location: Durham, North Carolina

1st & only hive installed Friday April 13th, 2007


« on: May 09, 2007, 04:26:38 PM »

Hello All, 

I have only looked into the hive closely one other time and am not sure what I am seeing. The photos and comments on the forum have been inspiring and educational and therefore I decided to take my camera with me too.   Photos could be tighter to show more detail but this was my first try with camera and bees. 

I've uploaded all 10 of todays pictures here. http://www.yogapc.com/MyMisc/HiveInspection_May9_2007/

And included 2 below:

I found the Queen on the 4th Frame In. 



This frame, 6th, worries me.   Its has lots of dark empty cells.  Whats going on?




The highlights of my inspection were: 

1) I found my queen on a beautiful frame and was able to get a few pics of her.
2) I saw healthy looking larva
3) I saw what looked like little bees just about to come out of their cells
4) I haven't seen tiny eggs.. that could be my eye site
5) I'm concerned however about the 6th frame...  It looked quite different. 

And thought my Hive Notes may be interesting to some too.
Wednesday May 9th 2007 (3 week old hive, installed package April 13  with new/empty foundation)

I had been away for a week and since returning am impatient to look into the hive and see how the bees are doing.  The Weather is less than perfect - overcast and a bit windy, however, the weather being better than yesterday I decide to go in and have a look anyway. 
2 Hive Bodies. 

Top hive body is small or medium - no activity in/on any of the frames.  Maybe 3 bees roaming. 
Bottom hive body is deep and seems to have a good amount of bee activity.

Frame One (outer edge) is unused, both sides.
Frame 10 (other edge) is unused on the outer side. The inner side has some activity and comb building. 

Frame 2 -  looks like they are just beginning to build it out.
Frame 4 - Looks great to me and I find the Queen.  This inspires me to try a few more shots with the camera.  (And miracle of miracles as you can see they come out okay)

Frame 6 - this frame looks different and I'm not sure I like it.  Lots of Dark, empty cells... what do you think is happening?

Frame 8 -  Looks lovely again. 

 Bee1
Logged

Bee1 with all Stings of the Universe.
papabear
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 170


Location: Crowley, LA.


« Reply #1 on: May 09, 2007, 04:37:42 PM »

Looks like really good brood pattern and honey. the sixth frame might be where bees have just hatched. Thats where the eggs might be. Just a guess.
Logged

"IF YOU BELIEVE THAT JESUS DIED FOR U, YOU WILL HAVE ETERNAL LIFE."
kathyp
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 15101


Location: boring, oregon


« Reply #2 on: May 09, 2007, 04:49:31 PM »

bet papabear is right.  the 6th frame would be toward the middle and probably where the queen would lay fist.  that would be the first brood to hatch.

looks really nice to me....but maybe not as many bees as i would expect?  how big was your package, or was it a warm day with many bees out?
Logged

.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
Bee1
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 81

Location: Durham, North Carolina

1st & only hive installed Friday April 13th, 2007


« Reply #3 on: May 09, 2007, 05:30:00 PM »



Cool -

bet papabear is right.  the 6th frame would be toward the middle and probably where the queen would lay fist.  that would be the first brood to hatch.

Definitely the queen has been working the middle frames first and it did occur to me that these were used brood cells   -- however, it still looked kind of funky and dark compared with the other cells so thought I'd put it out there.   


looks really nice to me....but maybe not as many bees as i would expect?  how big was your package, or was it a warm day with many bees out?

It was a 3 lb package to begin with ... todays temperature was low 70's, slightly overcast with a bit of wind.  (5 hours later its thundering and pouring down rain).  Bees were definitely out and about but I have no idea how many.  I think I may be a little light on bees too.  Maybe I have a slow starting hive.

Bee1
Logged

Bee1 with all Stings of the Universe.
Understudy
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 4640


Location: West Palm Beach, Fl


WWW
« Reply #4 on: May 09, 2007, 07:33:55 PM »

That looks pretty good. I think you have a hive well on it's way up. Don't sweat the poor pattern on the one frame like papabear said that is probably where they hatched out.

Sincerely,
Brendhan
Logged

The status is not quo. The world is a mess and I just need to rule it. Dr. Horrible
pdmattox
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1118


Location: lake city, florida


WWW
« Reply #5 on: May 09, 2007, 07:59:43 PM »

I think those are some good pictures and I think the hive is doing well for so being so young.  The brood nest is usualy in the center and they work out from there so the sixth frame does not look bad.
Logged

Scadsobees
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3198


Location: Jenison, MI

Best use of smileys in a post award.


« Reply #6 on: May 10, 2007, 08:48:04 AM »

Hi
Once they use the comb for brood, it starts to get "funky and dark" from the cocoons and such that they leave behind.  After a couple of years it will turn black.  Probably empty because they hatched out and the next generation is layed there.

That is normal, the bees seem to prefer to use comb that is like that.

Rick
Logged

Rick
Bee1
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 81

Location: Durham, North Carolina

1st & only hive installed Friday April 13th, 2007


« Reply #7 on: May 10, 2007, 09:22:33 AM »

I am so appreciative of this site!  Thanks everyone for the input. 

I'm feeling better about what I saw and trying not to worry to much.  However, its interesting how much we like to worry.  For example,  I was very excited to see my queen but now that I saw her its like ..  did i squish her when I put the frames back? 

I didn't realize that I crushed any of the bees during my last inspection however, as I was inspecting the hive this time I noticed crushed bees between some frames.. Must be from last time ..

Procedure Question:  I take out one frame, Inspect and place it on the ground, slide next frame forward, inspect, replace toward wall, repeat x 9.  I read that you should replace the frames so they are touching, than push all 9 frames back into position to replace the 1st frame. My hive is sticky and pushing all nine frames takes a lot of force/effort and I this may be when some the bees are gettting crushed..  Is this what you do?  I think I need to change this procedure. 

Bee1
Logged

Bee1 with all Stings of the Universe.
Robo
Technical
Administrator
Galactic Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6403


Location: Scenic Catskill Mountains - NY

Beekeep On!


WWW
« Reply #8 on: May 10, 2007, 09:29:14 AM »


Procedure Question:  I take out one frame, Inspect and place it on the ground, slide next frame forward, inspect, replace toward wall, repeat x 9.  I read that you should replace the frames so they are touching, than push all 9 frames back into position to replace the 1st frame. My hive is sticky and pushing all nine frames takes a lot of force/effort and I this may be when some the bees are gettting crushed..  Is this what you do?  I think I need to change this procedure. 


Your procedure is fine. If you can't push them all back at once, move 2 or 3 at a time.   Just make sure the frames are tightly pushed together when your done.
Logged

"Opportunity is missed by most people because it comes dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison


Jerrymac
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6047


Location: Wolfforth Texas


« Reply #9 on: May 10, 2007, 10:36:11 AM »

When frames are separated just a bit the bees will move into the space. When you are pushing the frames back together do it slowly and gently to allow the bees to get out of the way before you shove them completely together. Some bees are stubborn and take their time to move. 
Logged

rainbow sunflower  Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak.   rainbow sunflower

 Jerry

My pictures.Type in password;  youview
     http://photobucket.com/albums/v225/Jerry-mac/
kathyp
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 15101


Location: boring, oregon


« Reply #10 on: May 10, 2007, 10:56:10 AM »

make sure the bees can't get up your pants if you are putting frames on the ground.  that's how i got the first really nasty stings i took  smiley
Logged

.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
DayValleyDahlias
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1629


Location: Aptos, California


WWW
« Reply #11 on: May 10, 2007, 11:02:11 AM »

Funny, I was just reading about that procedure in "Beekeeping for Dummies"...When I worked with the apiary folks, they did not have me do it exactly that way.  We used the hive tool too loosen the first frame, removed it, inspected it, set it down.  Then we gently loosened the next frame inspected it etc...She had me gently move each frame back to it's position, then set the last frame in...I just took deep breaths and focused, moved slowly and consistantly.   No squished bees that I could see/feel...they were all pretty gentle...


Procedure Question:  I take out one frame, Inspect and place it on the ground, slide next frame forward, inspect, replace toward wall, repeat x 9.  I read that you should replace the frames so they are touching, than push all 9 frames back into position to replace the 1st frame. My hive is sticky and pushing all nine frames takes a lot of force/effort and I this may be when some the bees are gettting crushed..  Is this what you do?  I think I need to change this procedure. 


Logged


<img src="[url]http://banners.wunderground.com/weathersticker/miniWeather2_both_cond/language/www/US/CA/Aptos.gif
" border=0
alt="Click for Aptos, California Forecast" height=50 width=150>[/url]

"Become vegetarian/vegan, and no one gets hurt"
Jerrymac
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6047


Location: Wolfforth Texas


« Reply #12 on: May 10, 2007, 11:32:22 AM »

When pushing all the frames, when they are all together, the hive tool make a pretty good pry bar. Just do one end a little bit and then the other end so as not to twist the frames too much, or do it from the middle if possible. I have this tool https://www.dadant.com/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=22_29&products_id=737
I place the turned down end between the frame and hive wall and pull. Every thing slides right over.
Logged

rainbow sunflower  Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak.   rainbow sunflower

 Jerry

My pictures.Type in password;  youview
     http://photobucket.com/albums/v225/Jerry-mac/
reinbeau
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 2502


Location: Hanson, MA and Lebanon, ME


« Reply #13 on: May 11, 2007, 08:33:41 PM »

We have a frame hanger we put on the side of the super and put the frames on it as we go, or we bring out an empty super to set them in.  I don't know about putting them on the ground  huh  Don't like that idea much.
Logged


- Ann, A Gardening Beek -  ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

Click for Hanson, Massachusetts Forecast" border="0" height="150" width="256
Bee1
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 81

Location: Durham, North Carolina

1st & only hive installed Friday April 13th, 2007


« Reply #14 on: May 12, 2007, 07:40:00 AM »

I'll be a little more careful and try some of your suggestions over time.   I have a tool just like the one Jerrymac suggests and I have a a frame hanger on my shopping list as this looks like a handy item.   

make sure the bees can't get up your pants if you are putting frames on the ground.  that's how i got the first really nasty stings i took  smiley

 kathyp - I laughed a little bit.  I can see the wisdom of this advice and will be more careful.  Kiss  This does not sound pleasant. 

Bee1
Logged

Bee1 with all Stings of the Universe.
Brian D. Bray
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 7369


Location: Anacortes, WA 98221

I really look like this, just ask Cindi.


WWW
« Reply #15 on: May 12, 2007, 11:20:38 PM »

A few thoughts:
1.  The queen has a sweet (prefered) side of the hive.  When a package is put in a hive the bees will usually congrigate to one side or the other of the hive.  The side they congrigate to is the queens sweet side.  Looking from the rear of the hive, if the cluster is on the left side, I call it left handed, if it's on the right side--right handed.  You can almost always find the queen by noticing which is her sweet side and then pulling the frames from that side in this order: 3,4,2,5.  Then go to the other side and repeat.  Some hives are ambidexterous, clustering down the middle of the hive--a queen from such a hive will usually be found on the 3 middle frames of the brood chamber. 
2.  Use a frame hanger if you have 1, it saves the possibility of dropping the queen in the grass if she was on the 1st frame you pulled.
3.  Pull the 3rd frame from 1 side or the other 1st.  Pulling the frame next to the hive wall has a tendency to squish and kill bees by rooling them against the wall as the frame is withdrawn.  Drawing an inner frame allows the the dislodged bees to land amid other bees and the frames will prevent rolling. Also, if you're interesting in finding the queen you are already in the middle of her sweet spot.
4. Always put the frames back into the hive the same way you pulled them, the same order.  To do otherwise disrupts the content of the hive and forces the bees to do unneccessary house hold chores to correct the balance of the hive.  With new hives you can set them back a week or more by mixing up the order of the frames.
Logged

Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
Bee1
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 81

Location: Durham, North Carolina

1st & only hive installed Friday April 13th, 2007


« Reply #16 on: May 13, 2007, 12:40:53 PM »

 
A few thoughts:
1.  The queen has a sweet (prefered) side of the hive.  When a package is put in a hive the bees will usually congrigate to one side or the other of the hive.  The side they congrigate to is the queens sweet side.  Looking from the rear of the hive, if the cluster is on the left side, I call it left handed, if it's on the right side--right handed.  You can almost always find the queen by noticing which is her sweet side and then pulling the frames from that side in this order: 3,4,2,5.  Then go to the other side and repeat.  Some hives are ambidexterous, clustering down the middle of the hive--a queen from such a hive will usually be found on the 3 middle frames of the brood chamber. 

This is intersting and I will keep an eye on it.  My Queen has more heavily worked the left side of the hive - "her sweet side", and at this point in my career I am interested in seeing the queen as often as I can - just to see if I can find/recognize her. 

Can't finish my thoughts just now, I've been called away.  My husband called from REI and wants me to come check out a tent. 

Namaste,
Beee1
Logged

Bee1 with all Stings of the Universe.
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.96 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page August 22, 2014, 07:08:25 PM
anything