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Author Topic: OUCH! I'm very disappointed.  (Read 4586 times)
brit.thebee
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« on: May 07, 2007, 05:13:28 PM »

Hi everybody!
I've been having so much fun with all my bees and reading the forum often, which is so very helpful.  I've captured 3 wild swarms and two of them have stayed. 
However, it seems that I have a higher than normal sensitivity to the bee stings.   Didn't know this.  I'm not too worried about it.  I am a little disappointed that I can't be superhero beekeeper and that I have to wear all my stuff all the time, but I suppose I have no choice. 
So here's what happens...major local swelling that lasts over 48 hours,  intense burning and itching, creepy-crawly feelings on my arms, swollen tongue, vomiting, and nausea.   But that all happened a few hours after the stings occurred, each about two weeks apart: one on the back of my leg and one on my hand. 
Since I didn't die, do I really have that much to worry about?  Will I start to develop an immunity or are there too many symptoms?  I'm sure I sound like a dope, but I want to be careful without overreacting.

By day two my hand looked like a blown up latex glove.


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pdmattox
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« Reply #1 on: May 07, 2007, 05:37:58 PM »

It is better to be safe than sorry. I would at least see a doctor. When I first started I would swell but that was the extent of it.  The other syptoms sound like they warrant a doctor visit.
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kathyp
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« Reply #2 on: May 07, 2007, 05:43:52 PM »

yes, you have something to worry about.  from now on, until you see your doc (do that ASAP), pop 50 mg of benadryl when you are stung.  if symptoms continue after doing that take more.  since your symptoms come up over a period of time, you'll probably need to take more than one dose per sting.

you might want to buy some liquid benadryl.  as i recall, it's 25mg per ml.  you'll need a good swig of it and then a nap  smiley
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #3 on: May 07, 2007, 06:19:47 PM »

The swelling is no big deal the other symtoms listed are.  The nausea, vomiting, etc are major concerns.  It is possible that you will become more tollerant of the stings the more you get stung, but the opposite could happen.

When I went to pick up my packages of bees I meant a beekeeper who was allergic to bees, yet he still keep the little critters.  He just made sure he was wrapped up like a Christmas present everytime he went into his bees. 

At the moment I would clasify you as hightly sensitive.  Do as Kathyp states, see a doctor and use benadryl when stung.

Go luck and may you be undaunted in beekeeping.
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DavePaulson
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« Reply #4 on: May 07, 2007, 07:35:01 PM »

Allergic reactions do sometimes increase the next time you are stung. Definately see or talk to a doctor. Might want to keep an epi pen on hand.
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Jacmar
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« Reply #5 on: May 07, 2007, 08:49:51 PM »

Yes, I would also, as the other folks here have advised, see your doctor. I have never used benadryl but a lot of people attest to it's use. Also inquire from your doctor if maybe you should  carry an Epi-Pen in case your reactions get stronger and breathing could become difficult with the swollen tongue etc.

Jack

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« Reply #6 on: May 07, 2007, 08:56:03 PM »

Go see a doctor, however when you do tell him you intend to continue to work on bees. He can then work on a remedy to help you and your reactions. The doctor will first and foremost tell you to stay away from bees. Makes his job easy. Not all doctors will work on you with an immunity regiment. So you may have to shop a little but it is possible. Also see an allergist and a nutritionist. Because you reaction may be a combination of bee venom and something else.

Sincerely,
Brendhan
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« Reply #7 on: May 07, 2007, 08:56:57 PM »

yup I would see a doctor, because it sounds like you very allergic, wear all you protecting cloths from now on, when I get stung it is a little swelling and that's it... the doctor will give you epinephrine shots to give to your self and that will stop all the allergic symptoms.... well on most it does!!! 
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brit.thebee
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« Reply #8 on: May 07, 2007, 10:07:53 PM »

Well dang.  I was kinda holding on to the hope that you would all respond with a "don't be silly"  or "you paranoid freak" or "you big crybaby".  But I guess I knew it was true.  Thanks for the sound advice.   
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« Reply #9 on: May 07, 2007, 10:14:43 PM »

As one who has been through a year long series of shots to be desensitized for bee stings I agree with the others. Your reaction to the sting or stings warrants seeking medical attention. Your next sting may cause less of a reaction or it cause a much more serious one. In rare cases bee stings can be fatal for someone who is sensitive to the venom.

The only thing I would suggest differently is by pass the MD as most of them know very little about treatment for stinging insect sensitivity. Call your local allergist and explain your situation and see if he will help you become desensitized. You may need to call more than one if they are like the ones in my area. Several of them here didn't even want to skin test me because they didn't want to deal with anaphylactic shook should it occur during treatment. Good luck in getting over your sensativity.....
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kathyp
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« Reply #10 on: May 07, 2007, 10:24:23 PM »

one note.  your allergist should be an MD.  bypass your GPor get a referral from him/her to the allergist.
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« Reply #11 on: May 07, 2007, 10:31:17 PM »

Definitely an Epi-Pen.  You had a local and systemic reaction...the Benadryl is an excellent suggestion, and your MD may prescribe cortisone orally for you if you get stung again.

You love your little bees, so go to the allergy specialist MD...wear your gear...be safe!
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #12 on: May 07, 2007, 11:24:29 PM »

Sometimes the next sting is much better and sometimes it's worse.  Usually they get worse for a while and then get better if you live through it. Smiley

I'd go to a specialist that does bee desensitization.  Any other doctor will just tell you to quit beekeeping.
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brit.thebee
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« Reply #13 on: May 07, 2007, 11:25:09 PM »

I do love my little bees. 
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AllanJ
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« Reply #14 on: May 08, 2007, 06:20:26 AM »

I do love my little bees. 

As much as it goes against my male instincts to say this ..  just cover up real good ..   Cry

..until you know what your dealing with.
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« Reply #15 on: May 08, 2007, 07:29:31 AM »

Hi everybody!
I've been having so much fun with all my bees and reading the forum often, which is so very helpful.  I've captured 3 wild swarms and two of them have stayed. 
However, it seems that I have a higher than normal sensitivity to the bee stings.   Didn't know this.  I'm not too worried about it.  I am a little disappointed that I can't be superhero beekeeper and that I have to wear all my stuff all the time, but I suppose I have no choice. 
So here's what happens...major local swelling that lasts over 48 hours,  intense burning and itching, creepy-crawly feelings on my arms, swollen tongue, vomiting, and nausea.   But that all happened a few hours after the stings occurred, each about two weeks apart: one on the back of my leg and one on my hand. 
Since I didn't die, do I really have that much to worry about?  Will I start to develop an immunity or are there too many symptoms?  I'm sure I sound like a dope, but I want to be careful without overreacting.

By day two my hand looked like a blown up latex glove.





That swelling your seeing can happen in your throat and restrict your breathing. 
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« Reply #16 on: May 08, 2007, 08:21:30 AM »

The swelling at the sight of the sting is not unusual. The burning and itching at the sight of the sting isn't that unusual. The swollen toungue, vomiting and nausea are unusual. Unless you are also pregnant. Now if this was one or two stings this would be an extreme reaction. If you have gotten stung around 100 times this might be normal reaction.

Now if you have been getting stung a few times everyday, eventually you will reach what apitherapist call a threshold point and start experencing flu like symptoms for about 48 hours. This will pass but it is also a sign for some that they have built up a certain tolerance. People with allergies do not tend to build up a tolerance. Because the allergic reaction is caused by the body's reaction to the item it see as invasive. Instead they tend to become more sensitive to it (as I understand it). That is why you need to work with a allergist(MD)on a treatment regiment to retrain your immune system.

Now I have been stung in the throat. It didn't close my airway but it did put me down on the couch for almost an hour. Most stings don't bother me beyond some swelling and itching. Unless they get me someplace sensitive like my underarm or neck.

Sincerely,
Brendhan

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Jerrymac
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« Reply #17 on: May 08, 2007, 11:59:47 AM »

Well dang.  I was kinda holding on to the hope that you would all respond with a "don't be silly"  or "you paranoid freak" or "you big crybaby".  But I guess I knew it was true.  Thanks for the sound advice.   

OH Alright. Don't be silly you big crybaby paranoid freak. Go see the Doctor.
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Bennettoid
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« Reply #18 on: May 08, 2007, 03:36:06 PM »

I'm not overly sensitive, but my Brother is, so I guess its possible its in my family.

Do you need a prescription for an epi pen? It might not be a bad idea to keep one around just in case.
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brit.thebee
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« Reply #19 on: May 08, 2007, 04:14:26 PM »

OH Alright. Don't be silly you big crybaby paranoid freak. Go see the Doctor.

Thanks for that!




You do need a prescription for an epi pen.  And yes I'm allergic.  But not the immediate oh no she's gonna die extremely allergic.  So the delayed reaction, according to the dr, means I don't really need the shot on hand.  If I get stung more than 4 or 5 times it could be pretty threatening.  I did get another prescription that falls somewhere between benadryl and the epi pen to take if I get a sting.
But the best thing is to stay covered anytime I'm working with my girls.  So no more naked outdoor time for me. 

Thanks for your responses.
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