Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
October 30, 2014, 02:43:54 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: ATTENTION ALL NEW MEMBERS
PLEASE READ THIS OR YOUR ACCOUNT MAY BE DELETED - CLICK HERE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Queenless in Alabama  (Read 1407 times)
yoderski
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 59

Location: Atmore, AL


« on: May 05, 2007, 08:35:16 AM »

No that is not the name of a new movie, but it describes my situation here.  It is slightly complicated, but here goes.  I had one hive of two to make it through the winter, and it was going full bore this spring.  In the meantime, I bought another hive, and nuc, as well as captured 2 swarms, so I am up to 5 now.  The swarms at 17 days post capture showed no sign of eggs or brood so when I went looking in my other hives for brood, I found evidence of open queen cells in each of the other hives, and not a lot of brood anywhere. So apparently all had swarmed.   One hive had an unopened queen cell.  However, plenty of bees were found.  And then to top it off, I found my queen in the overwintered hive dead under a frame that same day.  So basically, 5 hives with no evidence of a healthy queen.  So I was able to get 2 queens from a local beekeeper, and also got 4 frames of brood, to requeen my two biggest hives.  That has hopefully corrected that problem.  Now I have 2 queens coming from Rossman Apiaries which should be here next week, which I intend to put in the swarms.  However, I have no brood to put in those swarms.  (I am assuming the hatching queen in the other hive will take care of that one)  The question is, can I just put a queen in the two swarms, without any brood comb?  Will she just pick up and go to work when she gets out of the cage?  Both swarms are working like mad--they have drawn out comb beautifully and put up a lot of honey thus far, just no queen.  My thought on the missing queens--I suspect the maiden voyage of the new queens is a perilous one around here--I have an active purple martin colony of 60+ birds, and they may have trouble making it back from their honeymoon!
Logged

Jon Y.
Atmore, AL
asprince
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1698

Location: Fort Valley, Georgia


« Reply #1 on: May 05, 2007, 09:03:43 AM »

I am not yet qualified to answer your questions, but I do have a question for you. Do Martins eat honey bees? I was thinking about putting up some Martin houses. I have enough issues with my bees without bringing on another. Good luck with your hives, you will get tons of good advice here. Steve
Logged

Politics is supposed to be the second oldest profession. I have come to realize that it bears a very close resembalance to the first. - Ronald Reagan
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #2 on: May 05, 2007, 09:14:24 AM »

Yonderski, I don't see why you would need to put in frames of brood with the swarms.  The queen will be released and immediately begin to lay eggs.  This will keep the bees busy.  I would think that surely things would be OK.  Good luck, hope all goes well, great life, great health and a beautiful day.  Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13768


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #3 on: May 05, 2007, 09:19:47 AM »

>The question is, can I just put a queen in the two swarms, without any brood comb? 

You do it with packages all the time.

You are assuming they are all queenless.  In my experience they often appear to be (no brood or eggs) but actually have a virgin queen.  In the time it takes them to rear an emergency queen all the brood will have emerged.  In good weather it takes 14 days from emergence to seeing eggs.  In bad weather it could take more.  If she's not laying in 24 days or so, then you either have a queen who can't mate or no queen.

If you have no young brood (young enough to make a queen) then it is a dilemma.  Normally I'd put a frame of eggs and open brood in any hive that is suspected as queenless for insurance.  If there's a virgin running around in there you won't waste your queens trying to requeen, and if there isn't you won't risk them dwindling and turning into laying workers.
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
yoderski
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 59

Location: Atmore, AL


« Reply #4 on: May 05, 2007, 03:47:41 PM »

Purple martins in general do not eat bees.  That is from my experience with having both over the past couple of years.  However, I was speculating that perhaps the queen being a little larger might be a tempting target for them....However, that is all speculation, and I suspect there are other causes for my problem.  If Michael Bush is right, maybe I should wait a little longer.  Particularly the one swarm is very contented, and working like there is no tomorrow--perhaps there is a virgin queen in there that needs to get cranked up yet.  Particularly if they raised it from the brood I put in there to begin with....
Logged

Jon Y.
Atmore, AL
papabear
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 170


Location: Crowley, LA.


« Reply #5 on: May 06, 2007, 10:11:53 AM »

I might be wrong but don't swarms always make new queens shortly after finding a new home because they swarm with an old or failing queen? I think it is just a virgin queen maybe just wait like M. Bush said. grin
Logged

"IF YOU BELIEVE THAT JESUS DIED FOR U, YOU WILL HAVE ETERNAL LIFE."
Shizzell
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 284


Location: Hopelessly Lost


« Reply #6 on: May 07, 2007, 12:53:39 PM »

Papabear, they don't always create new queens. 1st. Swarms don't swarm because of failing/old queens. You would get an opposite behavior, they would NOT swarm. 2nd. How would the bees create a new queen if they have a failing queen? You need eggs to create a queen.

About the purple martins. 1st. Queens rarely leave/go outside the hive (besides swarm + mating) and on that rare occasion, I doubt a martin is just waiting. (You never know though) 2nd. Purple martins usually feast on smaller insects such as mosquitoes (Martins eat more mosquitoes than bats).

Jake
Logged
Brian D. Bray
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 7369


Location: Anacortes, WA 98221

I really look like this, just ask Cindi.


WWW
« Reply #7 on: May 07, 2007, 05:41:07 PM »

>>(Martins eat more mosquitoes than bats).

To what ratio?  I think a bat would be a real mouthful for a Purple Martin.  LOL 
Logged

Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
yoderski
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 59

Location: Atmore, AL


« Reply #8 on: May 11, 2007, 08:49:31 AM »

Update is in order.  Michael was right as usual.  I checked 2 of the hives that were supposedly queenless, because so far my queens from Rossman haven't showed up, and surprise--now lots of eggs and larvae now. My two local new queens seem to be released ok. So now I am getting two more queens that I suppose I don't really need.  Anyone need one here in this area?  I think it goes to show don't give up on them too early.. 
Logged

Jon Y.
Atmore, AL
Understudy
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 4640


Location: West Palm Beach, Fl


WWW
« Reply #9 on: May 11, 2007, 09:06:11 AM »

I might be wrong but don't swarms always make new queens shortly after finding a new home because they swarm with an old or failing queen? I think it is just a virgin queen maybe just wait like M. Bush said. grin

Not exactly. When a swarm leaves they take the old queen with them. They will only replace her if there is an issue. If she is healthy and laying well. They will not replace her. If she doesn't do well after the trip they will use the eggs whe lays to make a new queen.

The reason a swarm leaves with the old queen is because they are already practiced at having a good hive. So the bees already know how to work on establishing a good home.

Sincerely,
Brendhan

Logged

The status is not quo. The world is a mess and I just need to rule it. Dr. Horrible
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.336 seconds with 21 queries.

Google visited last this page October 25, 2014, 06:52:23 PM
anything