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Author Topic: Brood Question  (Read 1453 times)

Offline skullring

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Brood Question
« on: May 03, 2007, 10:36:50 PM »
I hived my package bees on 4/19/07.  On 4/28/07 I inspected and the queen was released and there were plenty of new eggs.  Today 5/3/07 I inspected and I have some capped brood and plenty of larvae.  My question is I did not see any new eggs but it appears that all of the cells are full with either larvae, pollen, sugar syrup.  Is it possible that the queen just doesn't have any empty cells to lay in?  I started on new foundation and they have about 4 frames of foundation drawn out pretty well.  I have about 3 sides full of larvae.  I guess it is possible that I just didn't see any eggs but I looked pretty well.
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Offline Understudy

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Re: Brood Question
« Reply #1 on: May 03, 2007, 10:38:32 PM »
Yes it is possible for the queen to run out of places to lay.

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Offline Brian D. Bray

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Re: Brood Question
« Reply #2 on: May 04, 2007, 02:06:19 AM »
A good queen will lay eggs in the comb as it's being built.  With 3 of 4 frames of drawn comb full of brood I would say you have a good queen that has laid as many eggs as she can until more comb is drawn.  Once the current brood hatches the build up of the hive will increase with more workers to do the job. 

If you're still feeding stop.  The bees may also be at the point where they force the queen to stop laying because they need to develop some nectar storage area. 
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Offline skullring

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Re: Brood Question
« Reply #3 on: May 04, 2007, 08:08:03 AM »
Thanks for the help guys.  The bees have slowed down on taking the syrup.  I think they have just run out of cells to store in.  I have lots of syrup and pollen and brood stored.
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Offline Bennettoid

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Re: Brood Question
« Reply #4 on: May 04, 2007, 10:43:13 PM »
Good question. My Package has also slowed down taking syrup. I've been wondering when I need to remove it.

The head Apiary Inspector for the Delaware Ag. Dept. told me to keep feeding them. I think I will.

Offline Brian D. Bray

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Re: Brood Question
« Reply #5 on: May 04, 2007, 11:43:37 PM »
Feeding is meant to give a jump start.  Give the bees a ready source of syrup to build comb with then let them be bees.  I have always operated on the idea is that a gallon of syrup per hive is all thats needed.  I have had my bees for a week and have stopped feeding 3 of 4.  The forth is not taking syrup, nor is it foraging alot. 
The difference between hives a few feet away from each other can be remarkable.
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Offline buzzbee

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Re: Brood Question
« Reply #6 on: May 05, 2007, 07:38:31 AM »
If you have nice temps and you've got dandelion and lots of trees budding and blooming,pull the syrup if they have drawn some comb.Natures feed is best!When the brood hatches they will consume a lot of the stored syrup raising the next batch of brood and the queen will lay in the cells as they become available.

Offline skullring

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Re: Brood Question
« Reply #7 on: May 05, 2007, 04:30:43 PM »
Good news.  :-D I just inspected the hive and I have all ages of brood from day one eggs all the way to capped brood.  It looks like the bees used some of the stored syrup for energy to draw out foundation.  They have drawn out about 2 frames almost all the way since the last time I was in there.  I also saw about 9 SHB's that met with their maker today.  I think I am going to have a very strong colony I have 10 deep frames coming from brushy mtn that it looks like I will be needing soon.  The bees of course know what to do the keep the queen laying.  I however am still learning.  Thanks for the help everyone.  Phil
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Offline shakerbeeman

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Re: Brood Question
« Reply #8 on: May 05, 2007, 04:35:31 PM »
Feeding is meant to give a jump start.  Give the bees a ready source of syrup to build comb with then let them be bees.  I have always operated on the idea is that a gallon of syrup per hive is all thats needed.  I have had my bees for a week and have stopped feeding 3 of 4.  The forth is not taking syrup, nor is it foraging alot. 
The difference between hives a few feet away from each other can be remarkable.

Are you mixing 2/1 water Brian? I have read wide ranges as to how much they need. Your method is conservative and if it works I like it.

Online kathyp

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Re: Brood Question
« Reply #9 on: May 05, 2007, 05:33:22 PM »
i don't know what brian does, but i fed 1:1 for the first week and 1 pollen patty per hive.  after that, they were on their own and had plenty to keep them busy.  i might not even have done that much if the weather had been better, because a good bit of the comb i gave them was already drawn.

finsky is always telling us we feed to much  :-).  i am just cheep.  if nature is feeding them, i'm not going to!
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Offline Brian D. Bray

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Re: Brood Question
« Reply #10 on: May 05, 2007, 10:25:19 PM »
My mentor taught me to feed only when absolutely necessary.  I've been doing it that way since 1959.  I like to let the bees be bees.  Overfeeding can cause a multitude of problems from honey bound to nosema.  The bees build up to full size a little slower, but they are stronger going into winter having used natural energy sources all summer.  I've always had better luck letting my bees be bees than forcing sugar syrup down their throats.  I prefer to let them winter on their own harvest not something I concoct to nurse them through. 
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