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Author Topic: Adding second hive box  (Read 1728 times)
ZuniBee
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« on: April 27, 2007, 12:37:10 PM »

Last week I had one hive (ten frame, new packages) with 3 frames built comb, two with 5 frames built comb, and one with 6 1/2 frames of built comb. I am planning to add another deep and know I should once 8 frames are drawn. I am assuming the only way to determine progress is to inspect again. I don't want to over inspect but can't figure out when they are ready. The weather was pretty bad up to last week and this week it has been great. So, I imaging they have built a lot more comb that last week.

Should I inspect to make sure or just add the deeps?

Thanks,

J
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Shizzell
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« Reply #1 on: April 27, 2007, 12:47:18 PM »

Add a deep as you see them full. I can inspect my bees once a week and they don't get at all bothered by over inspecting. The only time they get a little defensive is when they have honey stores. So, I just give them a little more smoke and they are fine. So, open them all up, see if they have atleast 7 full, and add a deep as you see necessary.

Jake
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tillie
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« Reply #2 on: April 27, 2007, 12:49:13 PM »

"Inspect" can mean so many things.  When we are in the middle of a honey flow, my version of "inspect" is to open the top cover and see how they are doing in the honey supers.  I do that at least once a week.  I don't interfere with the brood boxes unless I have a reason to anticipate a problem.

Hope that helps,

Linda T in Atlanta

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Shizzell
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« Reply #3 on: April 27, 2007, 12:54:05 PM »

Quote
Last week I had one hive (ten frame, new packages) with 3 frames built comb, two with 5 frames built comb, and one with 6 1/2 frames of built comb. I am planning to add another deep and know I should once 8 frames are drawn.

Wait. You have just 1 hive? I'm assuming you have multiple... "two with 5 frames build comb", "3 frames build comb", and one with "6 1/2 frames of built comb" You have 6 hives correct?

Jake
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ZuniBee
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« Reply #4 on: April 27, 2007, 12:59:12 PM »

I have four hives -
one had 3 frames drawn
two had 5 frames drawn
and one with 6 1/2 frames drawn

"Inspection" Ok, it makes sense....If I am just opening the top and looking to see if the comb is drawn it is different than inspecting the brood. Tomorrow I will take a quick look and if they have drawn the comb I will add a deep.

Thanks for the info!

J
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AllanJ
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« Reply #5 on: April 27, 2007, 06:45:25 PM »

Inspecting is another reason why I think the hive top feeder is not good for a beginner or a new package. Without the feeder, it takes but a few moments to remove the outer and inner cover, peak inside and then cover.  I can replace the covers without too much damage or killing any bees.

With the top feeder, it always seemed like a major disruption to take it off, break the burr comb apart, set it to one side with all the bees clinging to it, look inside, clean off the burr comb and then killing a few bees whilst trying to replace something that weights a few lbs.

I have enjoyed the hives a lot better since I was able to peak inside.
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ZuniBee
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« Reply #6 on: April 27, 2007, 06:50:10 PM »

Yeah, I can see where the feeder makes it more difficult. It is pretty easy for me to remove the top cover and slide the inner cover back and fill the feeder. But, to see the frames, I have to completely remove the inner cover and the feeder which is more disruptive. I'm going to peak tomorrow and see if it's time to add the second hive body. After the storms passed through today I went out and the bees are bringing in pollen like crazy. Since there sere storms today I didn't want to mess with the hives until tomorrow.
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ZuniBee
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« Reply #7 on: April 27, 2007, 06:56:32 PM »

How about this....how long should it take to draw comb and fill the second hive body? I know it varies by hive but what would be considered a good time to build a deep? 1 week, 2 weeks?
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MarkR
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« Reply #8 on: April 27, 2007, 08:10:44 PM »

Hmmmm, good thinking Zuni, that's something I'd like to know as well.

Mark
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tillie
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« Reply #9 on: April 27, 2007, 10:22:24 PM »

In my hives last year it took about 2 weeks to draw the comb and then how quickly they fill and cap it has everything to do with the flow.  Right now while we are in the middle of the honey flow in Georgia, a super can get filled completely in a week, but as the summer comes on, that time draws way out.

Linda T in Hotlanta
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MarkR
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« Reply #10 on: April 28, 2007, 10:00:18 AM »

Thanks, Linda.  That's exactly what I needed to know.

Mark
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tillie
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« Reply #11 on: April 28, 2007, 10:35:05 AM »

Also because so much in beekeeping is weather dependent, bloom season dependent, etc. I regretted last year not having enough boxes ahead - once I knew the bees were ready but I was still waiting on UPS.

Now I have "too many" but I'm sure I'll more hives over time or will sell the extras at my bee club auction or something.

Linda T in Atlanta with lots of wooden ware
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n9kww
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« Reply #12 on: April 28, 2007, 10:38:11 AM »

To be or not to be that is the question:
When to add is easy, how long it will take for a given colony to fill a hive body of foundation is any ones guess. If you have a real strong queen and they build up very quickly this could be in as little as a week, or it coould go as much a a month. The only real way to know is to look at them over a period of time, then you will get to know what hive is doing what. This is the main point of keeping records, if you write it down ( every time whith out fail) you can get a real good idea of when to do or not to do any given managment.
as a beginner i always and very strongly recoment a boardman feeder, becouse of inspection and feeding loss. You can just look at how much they are eating and from there get a very very good idea of how much work they are doing without having to open up anything. secondly less deisruption when filling the feeder, just rome it in the venening and replace it, when they get up moving the next day it's full and eady for them. third, if you have to medicate them you can with out having to empty out and refill, it is simple to just remove the boardman and place a second jar with the med's in its place. Th KISS methoed is the best

ron
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MarkR
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« Reply #13 on: April 28, 2007, 11:33:27 AM »

Thanks Ron and Linda.  I'm still learning so much.  And not enough. . .

Mark
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Bee1
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« Reply #14 on: April 28, 2007, 03:15:47 PM »

Hello all,


Does a second hive body need to be deep, or will a medium hive body work as well for the bees for laying and storing and etc..  ?
That is the only size I have available at the moment.   I was thinking of using this 2nd medium hive body for the bees, and than adding a queen excluder and another med super on top of that when the time was right.   

  This is my very first hive and it is only ~2 weeks old at the moment. I went into the hive this afternoon and found that the bees have been working away and the bottom deep was very nearly full of comb in various states.  I am surprised by how deep orange some of the cells are, I think they are pollen cells, and how dark (honey?) other cells were.  I also saw my first signs of brood and was pleased.
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n9kww
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« Reply #15 on: April 28, 2007, 04:36:13 PM »

It does not have to be a deep, BUT you will not get the production either, less space less bees. The general rule of thumb is two hive bodies (deep boxes) and then quen excluder and honey supers on top. No brood in the honey and they have plenty of room for bothe brood and WINTER honey for themselves.
that is the second reason for using two deep boex, brrod size and honry storage size. In the world of bee's SIZE DOES MATER.
Ron
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Zoot
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« Reply #16 on: April 28, 2007, 08:28:22 PM »

Why not just use mediums all throughout. A lot of people here have changed over or never did it any other way. I use 8 frame mediums only and the bees will fill a 2 medium brood chamber just as quickly and efficiently as they will a single deep. Only I have more management options with the mediums. Same goes for honey supers.                         
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AllanJ
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« Reply #17 on: April 28, 2007, 08:33:30 PM »

I'm using all mediums.. for brood, supers and when I have more bees, nucs too.
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