Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
August 30, 2014, 08:27:07 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: ATTENTION ALL NEW MEMBERS
PLEASE READ THIS OR YOUR ACCOUNT MAY BE DELETED - CLICK HERE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat(1)  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Swarm Queens  (Read 3693 times)
TJ
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 36

Location: Ithaca, NewYork


« on: June 10, 2004, 02:34:19 PM »

It is now swarm season and many hobby beekeepers are looking for free bees. My first swarm was 3 feet up a maple tree in someones back yard. Are they all that easy? cheesy  Well, after a week, my new swarm, which has lots and lots of bees, has built a ton of wax, but I can't find any sign of the Queen. I thought I did a good job capturing this swarm. I even saw many bees flying into the box I dumped the cluster into. I assumed this meant they smelled the Queen in there. So I ordered a new Queen, but now I was told maybe it was an afterswarm with a virgin Queen and she still needs to go on her mating flight.  How long should I wait to find out? If I wait an extra week and there was no Queen in there the whole time, have I lost my chance to introduce a new Queen? I have not introduced the new Queen yet.
Logged
Lesli
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 420


Location: Upstate NY


« Reply #1 on: June 10, 2004, 02:43:01 PM »

Quote from: TJ
It is now swarm season and many hobby beekeepers are looking for free bees.


I'm one of them! AND I'm in Ithaca. If you see another swarm, especially one that close to the ground, email me!
Logged

**************************
Lesli
http://beeyard.blogspot.com/
beemaster
Site Founder
Administrator
Galactic Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6229


Location: Manchester, NJ

It is my pleasure to bring the forums to you.


WWW
« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2004, 03:42:06 PM »

The Internet's good, but compressing a swarm and attaching it to an email - I'm not sure if Explorer supports that yet. Of course Netscape may have a plug in  shocked

And you thought I knew NOTHING about computers - lol
Logged

NJBeemaster my YOUTUBE Video Collection
Follow us on TWITTER
SKYPE NJBeemaster - include your FORUM NAME in contact request
My Personal FACEBOOK Page


"All donations to our forums are greatly appreciated"
Please click HERE to help support our forum.
Lesli
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 420


Location: Upstate NY


« Reply #3 on: June 10, 2004, 04:34:30 PM »

Quote from: beemaster
The Internet's good, but compressing a swarm and attaching it to an email - I'm not sure if Explorer supports that yet. Of course Netscape may have a plug in  shocked

And you thought I knew NOTHING about computers - lol


 cheesy

The daily swarms I catch are in the College's spamtrap, alas. And those are more like cockroaches than bees!
Logged

**************************
Lesli
http://beeyard.blogspot.com/
steve
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 62

Location: western NC


« Reply #4 on: June 10, 2004, 06:03:56 PM »

TJ,
 It's been my experiance that after a week to ten days you can find neither eggs or brood it might be prudent to requeen, considering that you also mentioned that your swarm had a large amount of bees which generally indicates a primary swarm. Most after swarms (virgin queens)are tipically not large swarms. Take care, if you wait to long to requeen, over two weeks, you run the risk of creating laying workers....
                                                                      Steve,
Logged
Lupus
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 26

Location: Alpharetta, GA


« Reply #5 on: June 11, 2004, 12:44:53 AM »

The first swarm issuing from a hive is usually the old queen. Old swarm queens are often considered suspect and replaced by beekeepers collecting swarms.

I had a similar experience with the swarm I just housed. My swarm was smaller and the queen was not laying after a week. I used a hive tool on her, created a honey flow with syrup and gave them a new commercial queen.

I frequently put the queen cage on the top frames of the hive and watch to see how they react to her. If they: swarm over the cage in large numbers, bite at the wire, try to get their stingers into it; I do not leave it in the hive. When the workers act relaxed and try to feed and groom her and her buddies I either just let her out over some brood frames or soften the candy and let them release her.

If after a couple of days they still do not seem to want her I pull 3-4 frames of brood and young nurse bees from my busier hives. I put a screen or Dual Screen divider on top of the swarm hive and place the 3-4 brood frames over it, filling the rest of the super with foundation or comb.  
This basically makes a young nuc over the swarm. Young nurse bees usually accept queens easily within a day of being over the queenless swarm.

I have one of those young nucs over a split that did not want their new queen in my apiary. Tomorrow I will: pull the nuc and screen off the split, place a sheet of newspaper over the top of the split, and place my young nuc on top of the newspaper. The bees will slowly chew through the paper gradually uniting into one happy, queened hive. A queen laying eggs with nurse bees to protect her is about as safe as she can be.

The nuc introduction method involves some labor but it is one of the safest ways to get a new queen into a hive. Many queens get killed when  queen cages are just shoved in and left.

Good luck!
Logged
TJ
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 36

Location: Ithaca, NewYork


« Reply #6 on: June 11, 2004, 01:01:17 PM »

I think I will try your young nuc over the colony method. It sounds very logical. Will the new Queens pheremone be able to reverse or suppress any laying workers? Would these older workers ever accept the new Queen once they have gone bad? Maybe I should just keep the seperating screen in until all the old, cranky bees have died off.  If I have older workers coming in the bottom with nectar, will they pass it through the screen to the younger colony above it? I love the theory of it. The older swarm, which is huge, can feed the growing nuc above, but they can't get at the Queen. At some point in time the swarm below will be smaller than the nuc above, and by then they should all "know" one another and can be combined. I'm going for it.
Logged
Finman
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 440


Location: Hopelessly Lost


« Reply #7 on: June 12, 2004, 02:31:32 AM »

Quote from: Lupus


I frequently put the queen cage on the top frames of the hive and watch to see how they react to her. If they: swarm over the cage in large numbers, bite at the wire, try to get their stingers into it; I do not leave it in the hive. When the workers act relaxed and try to feed and groom her and her buddies I either just let her out over some brood frames or soften the candy and let them release her.

 pull the nuc and screen off the split, place a sheet of newspaper over the top of the split, and place my young nuc on top of the newspaper. The bees will slowly chew through the paper gradually uniting into one happy, queened hive. A queen laying eggs with nurse bees to protect her is about as safe as she can be.

Good luck!


That is my favorite methods too. Laborous but sure.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.16 seconds with 21 queries.

Google visited last this page August 19, 2014, 12:25:37 AM