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Author Topic: Sugar syurp question  (Read 3796 times)
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Dan
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« on: March 26, 2007, 09:24:42 PM »

How do you make your sugar syrup? I put the water and the sugar in a pot and heat it till the sugar melts and the water turns clear then let it stand over night to cool. Is this the method most people use?
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #1 on: March 26, 2007, 10:08:37 PM »

Since you don't want to scorch the sugar, I boil the water, add the sugar, stir until it's clear and turn off the heat.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2007, 09:53:00 AM »

you can feed them warm syrup, especially in spring, they'll be very thankfull, but WARM not hot, so it feels good to you to.
making 1:1 syrups, hot water is optional, it takes a whole day if you make it with cold water, that suits me, at least for winter feeding. find what suits you best, just make sure, like michael already pointed out to not burn the sugar
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #3 on: March 27, 2007, 08:24:45 PM »

Mici is right.  They will take warm syrup on a cold day very quickly but not cold syrup on a cold day.  If you can put your finger in it without getting burned it's not too hot.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #4 on: March 27, 2007, 09:11:19 PM »

How much water to go with 1 lb/.45kg of sugar?

Sincerely,
Brendhan
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« Reply #5 on: March 27, 2007, 09:23:42 PM »

hhhhmmmm......... 16oz? LOL  cheesy
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« Reply #6 on: March 27, 2007, 09:37:09 PM »

Yes, but if they put a 5lb/2.26kg bag of sugar in a gallon container Does the sugar displace 80 oz/2.36 L? (1 gallon = 128oz = 3.78L)
I always did 1 lb/.45kg to 1qt/.946L but I was wondering if I was doing it right.

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Brendhan
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« Reply #7 on: March 27, 2007, 09:53:09 PM »

I was told to do it volume wise 1cup to 1 cup or 2 sugar to 1 water. A little over 2 to 1 was about all the more sugar I could get to remain in solution.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #8 on: March 27, 2007, 10:15:34 PM »

You put a wuffle of sugar to a wuffle of water.  It really doesn't matter what a wuffle is.
Wink
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #9 on: March 27, 2007, 10:43:11 PM »

Very well put Michael grin
Now hand me a wuffle,I'm gonna mix some syrup
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« Reply #10 on: March 28, 2007, 10:07:11 AM »

i told..aargh i must not didn't i tell you    i have to bestrong what did i say i can't help myself i was right the force is just to overwhelming

metric pwns fishhit

1 kilo of sugar does not displace 1 liter of water, however 1 liter of water weighs almost exactly 1 kilo.
1 waffle of this +1 waffle of that isn't that exact but...the bees won't mind if there's a little too much sugar
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« Reply #11 on: March 28, 2007, 11:03:16 AM »

As I posted previously, we were told by our beekeeping club to take a one gallon container, pour in five pounds of sugar, and then fill the gallon with as much hot water as it would hold.  Put the cap on and shake, shake, shake.  That's the easiest way I've found, and I'm sticking with it!  grin
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« Reply #12 on: March 28, 2007, 11:07:21 AM »

Here's the way I was taught:

Take a gallon jug and fill it about 1/3 full of hot tap water.

Put in  a 5 lbs bag o  sugar

Shake for everything your worth.

Top of the the jug with more hot tap water.

Shake a bunch more.
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« Reply #13 on: March 28, 2007, 11:09:36 AM »

Yeah, what reinbeau said! afro
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« Reply #14 on: March 28, 2007, 01:02:25 PM »

So if I got this right, it's 1:1 sugar and water in the spring. Right? When do you feed 2:1? or do you ever feed 2:1?
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« Reply #15 on: March 28, 2007, 01:31:08 PM »

1:1 is to simulate a nectar flow, this way you get the queen in a more laying mood, the bees are in general more active-to stimulate them
2:1 or thicker is supposed to be for winter feeding
i don't know why it is so.
i fed them in the fall with 1:1, they seem OK? plus, if you make thicker syrup they might not wanna eat it. i think that feeding more than 1:1 is a thing of bigger keepers, the ones that don't wanna waste another week feeding the bees if they can feed them a thicker syrup
note: i think so
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« Reply #16 on: March 28, 2007, 02:09:52 PM »

2:1 is for fall. It has less water so the bees can store it for winter. Spring(1:1) induces wax production and the excess water removed to process the syrup is more easily dissipated in the spring, and early summer w/o harming the bees. Feed thin syrup too early and you'll get excess moistrure in hive and if its not ventilated properly you will have problems.
As for recipes, the above are right. I boil water and remove from heat, then add sugar to avoid burning. Hot tap water is probably sufficient though.
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« Reply #17 on: March 28, 2007, 05:41:57 PM »

The New Zealand Beekeeping Association maintains a website with a calculator to help determine the water to sugar mix. 
For some reason beemaster won't let me leave the entire url, but if you place the standard http etc in front of the following info you should get to the calculator page

http://beekeeping.co.nz/convert.htm#sugarmix1

good luck
cb
« Last Edit: March 28, 2007, 05:45:29 PM by buzzbee » Logged

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« Reply #18 on: March 28, 2007, 06:58:28 PM »

Anything from 1:2 to 2:1 works fine.  As mentioned, it saves the bees a lot of work in the fall to not have to dry out the more watered down syrup.  People believe that 1:1 will stimulate brood rearing more than 2:1.  I have not observed that.  2:1 keeps better, and weighs less for the amount of sugar when I haul it to the beeyard.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #19 on: March 29, 2007, 09:52:11 AM »

How in the heck can all you guys shake your sugar syrup mixture.  that can be rather heavy.  I just stir and stir and stir, it mixes up so easily and I don't have to life a thing.

Appropriate amount of boiling water into a pail, add the sugar slowly while stirring and then continue stirring for a couple of minutes.  Done.  Best of the day.  Cindi
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« Reply #20 on: March 29, 2007, 02:00:37 PM »

How in the heck can all you guys shake your sugar syrup mixture.  that can be rather heavy. 
Pilates  evil  grin
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« Reply #21 on: March 29, 2007, 02:14:23 PM »

"How in the heck can all you guys shake your sugar syrup mixture"

Pick up the container.  Move it up and down, or side to side quickly so as to aggitate the contents.   grin

Keith
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« Reply #22 on: March 29, 2007, 04:37:26 PM »

My question is what if you make to much, can u put it on a shelf or in the fridge? Then re-heat it up or do the bee not like leftovers?  Or do you just throw out the leftovers? 
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« Reply #23 on: March 29, 2007, 04:49:38 PM »

yes you can use it later, in fact many have pre-prepared syrup, just in case...let say to feed a new swarm or anything, so you don't have to do the mess thing every time.
last year when i winter fed i prepared for a week ahead, but i think it's better to store it in cool place and in bottles, otherwise it might ferment or grow mold, i noticed that if i didn't use the whole bottle up, it grew mold in few days, if it's intact..i think it could go for ages.
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« Reply #24 on: March 29, 2007, 04:51:32 PM »

"My question is what if you make to much, can u put it on a shelf or in the fridge? Then re-heat it up or do the bee not like leftovers?  Or do you just throw out the leftovers?"

You certainly can.  Leaving it out will eventually grow mold, or ferment, especially the lower sugar content syrups.  Refridgereation helps to retard that.

You don't necessarily have to heat it up again - but bees do prefer warm syrup over cold

Keith
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« Reply #25 on: March 30, 2007, 12:56:23 PM »

For special bees use an herb tea instead of water with the sugar. Bees like many herbs, melissa especially, but lavendar, thyme, sage, chamomile. Probably others, let me know! Some herbs strengthen their immune systems. Steep the herbs in your measured water, then strain and melt in the sugar. Add a pinch of salt, as a preservative. Feed when it reaches about body temperature. I just heard a great tip on frame feeders, add pine needles to the frame feeder so the bees don't drown in it! If you have only a few hives you can make these special syrups for them.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #26 on: March 30, 2007, 08:18:29 PM »

>Bees like many herbs

Bees like syrup with smell.  Any smell.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #27 on: April 01, 2007, 11:40:04 AM »

So if I got this right, it's 1:1 sugar and water in the spring. Right? When do you feed 2:1? or do you ever feed 2:1?

since I'm installing package bees in 11 days, I'll be medicating with Fumagilin-B  The instructions with the medicine are this:


1.8 Liters water

3.6 Kg sugar

This will produce 4 liters or 1.056 gallons of syrup.


In case any is interested, this mixture requires .17 Ounces or 4.82g of Fumagilin-B
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« Reply #28 on: April 01, 2007, 02:05:03 PM »

"since I'm installing package bees in 11 days, I'll be medicating with Fumagilin-B"

I shouldn't think you need to medicate them at this point.

Keith
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« Reply #29 on: April 01, 2007, 02:08:37 PM »

"since I'm installing package bees in 11 days, I'll be medicating with Fumagilin-B"

I shouldn't think you need to medicate them at this point.

Keith

Hi Keith,

I'm told that this is a needed procedure for newly installed packages.  According to the instructions on the medication, this is standard procedure.  "1 gallon of medicated syrup for each package colony"  is what the instructions state.

A coworker of mine who has been beekeeping in Wisconsin for 15 years tells me that Fumagilin-B and Terramycin are standard medications following the installation of a package.

At what point would you recommend these medications? 


 Smiley
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« Reply #30 on: April 01, 2007, 07:51:45 PM »

>At what point would you recommend these medications? 

I do not use either, at all.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #31 on: April 02, 2007, 08:15:11 AM »

Mklangelo, many people don't use medications at all.  If the bees aren't sick, why bother?  It's the same as taking pennicilin constantly just to make sure you don't get an infection - where has that got us?  Super bugs that can't be controlled by antibiotics anymore.  Try to find a mentor who isn't chemical-dependent, or just come here for info and advice.  Smiley
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« Reply #32 on: April 04, 2007, 07:25:14 AM »

Mklangelo, many people don't use medications at all.  If the bees aren't sick, why bother?  It's the same as taking pennicilin constantly just to make sure you don't get an infection - where has that got us?  Super bugs that can't be controlled by antibiotics anymore.  Try to find a mentor who isn't chemical-dependent, or just come here for info and advice.  Smiley

He does seem really into the chemicals.  At first he was talking about Terramycin and Fumigilin-B  Now he's talking about Ocycillic acid, which I have no idea where to get and frankly don't feel like paying for all those Chemicals.  I think he likes spouting off the names of chemicals to be honest.   I do think I'd rather be more proactive and vigilant and try to treat things early if they arise.


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« Reply #33 on: April 04, 2007, 09:15:02 AM »

Oxalic acid is only used in the "broodless" period during winter, if you have winter time wherein the queen stops laying.  This treatment can kill the brood and we don't want that.  Best of this day.  Cindi
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« Reply #34 on: April 04, 2007, 07:33:42 PM »

Oxalic acid is only used in the "broodless" period during winter, if you have winter time wherein the queen stops laying.  This treatment can kill the brood and we don't want that.  Best of this day.  Cindi

Why on earth would he recommend that treatment in spring?  I'm starting to wonder about this guy...

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« Reply #35 on: April 05, 2007, 10:56:31 AM »

RE: oxalic, I have been told by good natural beekeepers to do a mite count in fall, if you have more than 20-30, fume with oxalic acid crystals. When the temp is above 50. (Oxalic is also called wood bleach at the hardware store and comes in crystals.)
Here is what I did last fall, I wonder what you all think about this:
In the bottom of an L-shaped copper plumbing tube (Bottom capped) I put 1 tsp of oxalic crystals. The open end of the tube went into the middle of the back of the hive. (The L was upside down by now, with the crystals at the bottom of the vertical leg) I sealed the entrance for 5 minutes while I heated the bottom of the tube with a torch. Fumes went in.
This spring my mite count was down to 3, so far so good, keeping fingers crossed.
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