Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
October 21, 2014, 01:26:06 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Beemaster's official FACEBOOK page
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: 1 2 3 [4] 5 6   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Varroa control procedures and one's responsibility to play mite shaman  (Read 15341 times)
Mici
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1502


Location: Zagradec, Grosuple, Lower Carniola, Slovenia

tougher than rock


WWW
« Reply #60 on: March 30, 2007, 10:34:19 AM »

finsky, well said about the authority things. but what soviets have to say about (well, had to say) about their authority is just true. lately, anywhere i look i see false "scientifical prooved" information, literally ANYWHERE!!! 
may i invite you to check out the "coffe house", there's a tread about global warming named "bann the usa", by me. but, this is just one, ONE of the things.

i don't know how dependant are you on beekeeping but i actually don't need bees, never have i needed bees, but since i got them, i just want to have them, although by now i've spend ugh, too much and got nothing, and probably never will get much, but i don't care. anyway, what i wanted to point out is that i will try the whole "natural" beekeeping, if it won't go, it won't i'll step to your side. so far i do not see a reason why i shouldn't be "against" your way of beekeeping, so far what they say about natural beekeeping seems logical, and they say it works, who in the world wouldn't give it a try?
they promis less work, less trouble....

just hope we can talk about my resultst in the next 5 years Wink
Logged
mick
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1450


Location: s/e melbourne australia (-)37.50S 145.0E


« Reply #61 on: March 31, 2007, 05:24:00 AM »

Hey Finsky! how do I make sugar water grin
Logged
Finsky
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2791


Location: Finland


« Reply #62 on: April 01, 2007, 04:53:04 PM »

Hey Finsky! how do I make sugar water grin


Bye one headfull sugar canes, then crush and strain.

http://static.flickr.com/33/88175208_4c176ea681.jpg
Logged
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #63 on: April 02, 2007, 09:54:56 AM »

Finsky, nope, the sugar cane is for chewing on, could last for days.  Have a wonderful day.  Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Finsky
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2791


Location: Finland


« Reply #64 on: April 02, 2007, 10:08:37 AM »

the sugar cane is for chewing on, could last for days. 


You may ask subcontractor to help

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d8/Sugar_cane_juice_Dhaka.jpg/800px-Sugar_cane_juice_Dhaka.jpg


.
Logged
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #65 on: April 03, 2007, 09:56:15 AM »

Eee gads!!!!  They crush the cane by hand???  LOL.  I prefer to chew on it.  Best of this grand day.  Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Eve Sylvia
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 30


Location: NY


WWW
« Reply #66 on: April 05, 2007, 11:17:32 AM »

I am new here, and I am trying to find out about sugar.So my question is: If I want to find out how to treat with sugar should I just follow all the threads and piece it together from your conversations, or is there a spot on the site or somewhere where directions are given?  I feel like I am walking into the middle and missed the beginning sometimes. Thanks again!!

( Here is my oxalic method, by the way)
RE: oxalic,  do a mite count in fall, if you have more than 20-30, fume with oxalic acid crystals. When the temp is above 50. (Oxalic is also called wood bleach at the hardware store and comes in crystals.)
Here is what I did last fall, I wonder what you all think about this:
In the bottom of an L-shaped copper plumbing tube (Bottom capped) I put 1 tsp of oxalic crystals. The open end of the tube went into the middle of the back of the hive. (The L was upside down by now, with the crystals at the bottom of the vertical leg) I sealed the entrance for 5 minutes while I heated the bottom of the tube with a torch. Fumes went in.
This spring my mite count was down to 3, so far so good, keeping fingers crossed.

Logged
tillie
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1740


Location: Atlanta, GA

Bee in N Georgia on a Blackberry flower


WWW
« Reply #67 on: April 05, 2007, 04:22:21 PM »

Search powdered sugar on this site (beemaster)

http://beekeeperlinda.blogspot.com/2007/03/bermuda-inspection-today.html
Above are pictures on my blog about how to do it

Randy Oliver's method is described on Beesource:
http://www.beesource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=200973&highlight=powdered+sugar

After the shake you put a sticky board under the SBB for 24 hours and count the mites.

Linda T
Logged

http://beekeeperlinda.blogspot.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"You never can tell with bees" - Winnie the Pooh


Click for Atlanta, Georgia Forecast" border="0" height="60" width="468
Kirk-o
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1059


Location: Los Angeles california


« Reply #68 on: April 05, 2007, 10:37:52 PM »

 think everyone who treats there bees with chemicals should list that on there label "This Honey Comes From Bees That Have Been Treated With Chemicals" And liste the chemicals
kirk-o
Logged

"It's not about Honey it's not about Money It's about SURVIVAL" Charles Martin Simmon
Finsky
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2791


Location: Finland


« Reply #69 on: April 06, 2007, 12:34:01 AM »

think everyone who treats there bees with chemicals should list that on there label "This Honey Comes From Bees That Have Been Treated With Chemicals" And liste the chemicals
kirk-o

Yeah!  "Natural honey. Ice Sugar added every week and syrup feeded whole summer". 
Logged
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13748


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #70 on: April 06, 2007, 09:52:56 AM »

>I put 1 tsp of oxalic crystals...

If you need to kill Varroa mites, it works very well.
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Dane Bramage
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 509


Location: Portland, Oregon


« Reply #71 on: April 07, 2007, 07:02:54 AM »

Yeah!  "Natural honey. Ice Sugar added every week and syrup feeded whole summer". 

hahaha ~ I really love your posts Finsky!  You are the Simo Häyhä of beekeeping.  cool

Cheers,
Dane
Logged

Finsky
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2791


Location: Finland


« Reply #72 on: April 07, 2007, 07:45:35 AM »

hahaha ~ I really love your posts Finsky!  You are the Simo Häyhä of beekeeping.  cool



I did not know  Simo Häyhä, but he seems to a really bad a*.*

It seems that  he was named "white death". http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simo_H%C3%A4yh%C3%A4

During the Winter War (1939 – 1940) between Finland and the Soviet Union, he began his duty as a sniper against the Red Army. Working in temperatures between −20 to −40 degrees Celsius, and dressed completely in a white camouflage suit, Häyhä was credited with 505 confirmed kills against Soviet soldiers.  ...Besides his sniper kills, Simo Häyhä was also credited with as many as two hundred kills with a Suomi M-31 SMG submachine gun, thus bringing his credited kills to at least 705.

.... hmmm, family forum.... more about bad a*.*s  http://libraryautomation.com/nymas/Changjinjournal020801.html

In Finnish language "motti" is one cubic meter of choped fire wood. So they choped  Russian army to smole "motties".


.
Logged
Dane Bramage
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 509


Location: Portland, Oregon


« Reply #73 on: April 07, 2007, 08:31:32 AM »

I did not know  Simo Häyhä, but he seems to a really bad a*.*

Valkoinen kuolema indeed & quite the hero and inspiration to many of those (myself included) involved in marksmanship (another hobby).  I thought you may have already known of him.  The analogy/metaphor was your posts are precise and deadly to illogic, like shots from a sniper (only much more funny).
Thanks for the other link.  Interesting!  The Finns (& Swiss) are an inspiration for defensive, independent states resisting the aggressive imperial ambitions of larger nations.  But I digress...

Back to topic re: v. destructor ~> do you have any advice on if/when would be a good time for formic acid fumigation springtime treatment for a new hive (built from Nucs)?  I'm still evaluating the severity of my own mite infestation (could be very minimal) and am curious - cautious to change the environment of a new hive with new queen.
Logged

Finsky
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2791


Location: Finland


« Reply #74 on: April 07, 2007, 11:07:31 AM »

You have spring there http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/city.html?n=202

And it seems that you have not leaves on trees.  http://www.trekearth.com/gallery/North_America/United_States/photo288.htm

If you want to kknow conamination of mites, it is laborous job with formic acid. If mites are too much you se them with naked eyes on just hatched bees.

Easier you will se if you make drone zone in brood frames. Leave lowest wire gap free from foundation, of cut from ready comb. Bees make drone combs and soon you will se how much capped brood carry mites.  If you se some in pic size area, that is normal. No need to calculate them all the time. No help from calculations.
http://bees.freesuperhost.com/yabbfiles/Attachments/kuhn.GIF

You live quite in north and you have real brood brake in winter. When you give one treatment with oxalic trickling, that is enough what you need.  Illegal or not, but don't tell to policeman.

.
Logged
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #75 on: April 07, 2007, 11:35:55 AM »

Finksy, right, the drone frame.  Last spring when I went down to visit an old time beekeeper from our bee club, he showed me his way of mite control through drone comb use.  He instructed me that this was what I was to do, to assist with keeping the varroa under control. 

He told me to take the dadant frame (1/2 size of the deep frame), place it in the 3rd frame (or 7th frame) position.  We have 10 frame Langstroth use.  The bees, like you said, Finsky, draw drone comb naturally on the bottom of these frames.  The varroa loves to lay its eggs in with the drones.  Perfect.   Once the brood is capped, the drone comb is removed and the human does whatever they choose to dispose of these critters.

This is all wonderful in theory.  BUT...I was neglectful last season and I readily admit this.  I performed this task with two of my colonies.  The black dadant in the 3rd position.  But I forgot about this in all my business in my life around the farm.  I never did remove the drone comb frame.

That was probably one of the biggest mistakes that I had ever made in my beekeeping.  I probably bred the varroa mite like there was no tomorrow.  Yup, I hang my head in shame.

I applied oxalic acid to my two colonies in mid December.  We have a broodless period in our short winters.  I lost one colony and have one colony left, which is building up like crazy.  With the O.A. treatment, broodless period, I anticipate NO varroa right now.  Not to say that when the weather warms up much more and the feral hives (if there are any) become active, the varroa may get transferred to my bees.  My neighbour that keeps bees lives a fair distance away, I do not know if he treats his bees.  Another neighbour that lives within flying distance of my hives treated her one colony the same time that I treated mine.  As far as I know, there are no other "cultivated" bee colonies within flying distance of my colonies. So, maybe things will go well this year.  I am anticipating a wonderful and healthy season with my girls.  Have a beautiful and awesome day, with good health.  Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Finsky
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2791


Location: Finland


« Reply #76 on: April 07, 2007, 12:11:23 PM »


I applied oxalic acid to my two colonies in mid December.  We have a broodless period in our short winters. 

That situation is easy to handle. It takes 3-4 years before mite kills the hive. Treatment every year keeps mites in harmless level.

I did not se many mites in summer but in every hive there were 300-500 mites when I trickled them.  This spring I have had harms with nosema but I have so much extra hives that that bothers me at all.  Beekeeping cannot go without losses and problems.
Logged
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #77 on: April 07, 2007, 12:18:59 PM »

Finsky, does nosema kill the adult bees and that colony collapses?  I know that nosema is usually brought on because the bees cannot get outside to deficate, like in your long winters with no flying weather.  But can this colony still carry on to be at all productive, or do you just say goodbye to the hive?  Have a wonderful day and great health.  Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Dane Bramage
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 509


Location: Portland, Oregon


« Reply #78 on: April 07, 2007, 12:37:59 PM »

Thanks Finsky.

Yes, we're definitely in spring time here and experienced record warm days the past two... back to normal for now.  Pears, cherries, dandelions, alder, maple, birch - all are in bloom and the pollen is so thick it covers anything left outside with what looks like a layer of curry.

I'm also clear on how to determine the level of mites.  I just not have done it diligently on my new hives yet.

I would like to be as "mite-free" as possible while still being as natural as possible.  This article from 5/05 ~> Survival of a Commercial Beekeeper in Norway seems like principled and workable approach.  Summary = mite resistant breeding/selection practises, small (4.9mm) cell brood (with large cell honey super (w/queen excluder)), organic acids.

The Formic Acid I was considering comes in pads ~> "250 ml of 65% food grade formic acid soaked into a fiber board pad inside a perforated plastic pouch." with a sustained, "safe" release ~> "...releases enough formic acid over three weeks to be an effective dose, charging the colony environment, but not enough to damage the colony health."

My question is if this would be specifically disruptive to a newly queened hive (i.e. interfere with the pheromones, etc.,). 
Logged

Finsky
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2791


Location: Finland


« Reply #79 on: April 07, 2007, 01:58:23 PM »

This article from 5/05 ~> Survival of a Commercial Beekeeper in Norway seems like principled and workable approach.  Summary = mite resistant breeding/selection practises, small (4.9mm) cell brood (with large cell honey super (w/queen excluder)), organic acids.
.,). 


Formic acid works fine in spring. Efficacy of method is something 70%.



.
Logged
Pages: 1 2 3 [4] 5 6   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 1.084 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page October 18, 2014, 08:29:00 PM
anything