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Author Topic: Snakes in my hive eating larva  (Read 3854 times)
Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #20 on: March 26, 2007, 01:39:23 AM »

Go to top entrances, that should cure the snake problem.
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Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
Kev
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« Reply #21 on: March 27, 2007, 06:57:10 PM »

Go to top entrances, that should cure the snake problem.

Using a top entrance or elevating the hives on a stand with smooth legs are solutions that makes the most sense. The snakes we have in the Northeast are pretty small. They could easily get through 1/4 in mesh. 

If you can, take a picture of one of them and post it to the forum. I'd be interested to see if I recognize the snakes.

Don't kill the snakes though. They're extremely good at keeping down unwanted bugs and other stuff...like mice.

Kev
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KONASDAD
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« Reply #22 on: March 28, 2007, 02:22:59 PM »

I have kept, bred, caught wild snakes and "Milked" snakes in my days. Bee larvae are rich in nutrients, a fact any wild animal would take notice. Snakes tongues are used for smelling and in some varities, assist w/ heat detection. Like some one else pointed out, animals often do that which is unrecognized in books. They don't read after all. I wouldn't worry about a snake eating some larvae. Snakes don't consume huge amounts of food like a skunk for example. A few larvae would probably suffice to fill a small snake. I like snakes, so I wouldn't do anything. Also, top entrances would probably work, but an opening big enough for the bees is probably big enough for some snakes-no matter where the entrance is placed. Snakes have no shoulders, and can get into places most animals could never get into. Picture please so identity could be ascertained.
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doak
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« Reply #23 on: May 07, 2007, 11:28:30 PM »

I would go with the hardware cloth. that will give you ventilation  more than the reducer.
I have noticed the little lizard's going in and out some of mine. Most of the snakes here are too big to get in the entrance, especially  the timber rattlers. really. shocked
doak
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bennettoidjr
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« Reply #24 on: June 30, 2007, 10:40:58 AM »

were the snakes dead when you saw them
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qa33010
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« Reply #25 on: July 01, 2007, 12:55:00 AM »

    I've got two hives elevated and near a stream with blackberry bushes and tall weeds and boggy soil.  Last time I was out there my walker was struck by a cotton mouth a few times, until I was able to give it a permanent attitude adjustment, and while working the hives a copperhead decided to try and get into the five gallon particulars bucket I brought with me.  Luckily I didn't get juiced.  I hate those two cousins.  I love coral and rattlers and have taught my wife, kids and friends how to tell a venomous from a nonvenomous snake (excluding coral) from a safe distance.  Snake killing is illegal here in Arkansas, unless they come after you. 

Maine doesn't have venomous snakes, do you?   The part of Minnesota I was raised in didn't.
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trapperbob
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« Reply #26 on: July 19, 2007, 07:28:58 PM »

The question is how big are these snakes. I ask this because in southeast nebraska they have what is called a worm snake and they get about as big as a large night crawler but most of them that I have seen are a little smaller they eat various insects and worms I could imagine one eating larva quite easily I have never seen one in my hives but I do know they are around. And back in Califonia where I originally grew up ive seen what looked like small juvinial garter snakes eating minnows and grass hoppers while we were out trout fishing.
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BEE C
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« Reply #27 on: July 26, 2007, 04:28:16 AM »

we have little garden snakes which eat the mice I believe, and sun on the boulder by the hives, never noticed any in the hives, however the cat loved to eat them...fascinating behaviour, it makes perfect sense that a small snake would eat larvae, I don't know about hardware mesh though a snake can fit into some pretty small places.  Perhaps requeen with some queens of temper. evil Im not trying to get my head into any larvae, and I am being whacked daily from one hive that turned evil.  I kind of don't mind a mean hive, i always wear a suit now because no matter where I am in the apiary Im in the flight path of some hive that doesn't appreciate it.  As far as Im concerned the mean hives are one more insurance policy against nosy bears or other pests.  Id love to see that snake if you catch it! Good luck. A mouse trap or sticky paper might be an option...
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