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Author Topic: Help swarm took over old hive  (Read 4689 times)
Atti
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« on: March 18, 2007, 12:05:51 PM »

Hi I need some held.We aquired a old hive from a bee keeper because I was interested in getting into bee keeping. Upon my inpection I realize that it was no good (Moths, mold). We discarded it in the yard while doing some research where to get a new hive and supplies. Yesterday to my suprise that old moldy hive has been occupies by a colony. They seems very busy. I just ordered a starter kit from Brushy Mountain Bee Farm but how will I get them to occupy the new hive once it arrives?Huh?
« Last Edit: March 18, 2007, 12:11:51 PM by buzzbee » Logged
Robo
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« Reply #1 on: March 18, 2007, 12:26:41 PM »

I would place the new hive kit in the same location of the old hive (move old out and new in).  Then move what brood you can along with the queen into the bottom center of the new kit.  Place a new frame in the middle and when they draw it out and it has brood,  place another next to it and slowly move the old frames to the outside.  Once they are to the outside and have no more brood, you can remove them.
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Atti
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« Reply #2 on: March 18, 2007, 12:31:26 PM »

 :)thanks! Will any of that bad stuff mess up the new hive? Smiley
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MrILoveTheAnts
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« Reply #3 on: March 18, 2007, 12:37:28 PM »

If anything I'd think they'd clean it out. Bees like to nest in boxes that have been occupied by old hives. It's also likely the people you got it from had used the box with for catching wild swarms before. Alcohol or Lemon Grass Oil, I've never used it but it sounds like good stuff (if I spelled the name right).
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« Reply #4 on: March 18, 2007, 12:43:50 PM »

:)thanks! Will any of that bad stuff mess up the new hive? Smiley

They will have cleaned any area that they are raising brood in.  This would be the only area I would more to your new equiptment. If there is no brood in it, don't take it.  The less you take the less you'll have to rotate out.   If there are frames with nectar or honey,  just let them rob it out (set them out in the open).
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Atti
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« Reply #5 on: March 18, 2007, 01:47:37 PM »

Thanks! I am really excited to start my bee keeping. I have always loved all kinds of bugs. I am a real nature person, my husband says he is going to put my bed outside!!! That would be fine with me if it wasn't for the mosquitos. Well that is one bug I hate because it makes me go inside. Do you guys have any pointers that would help me on my new bee keeping adventure?
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Kirk-o
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« Reply #6 on: March 18, 2007, 01:55:02 PM »

Bees love old hives and old equipment the older the better leave in there they will do fine
kirk-o
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Atti
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« Reply #7 on: March 18, 2007, 02:26:31 PM »

But the old hive is so nasty.
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« Reply #8 on: March 18, 2007, 02:32:06 PM »

Your bees are the best maid service for the hive you will ever need.

You bees will clean up the equipment as they need to.

Don't worry your bees know what they are doing.

Listen to what Robo said about moving them.

Sincerely,
Brendhan
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Atti
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« Reply #9 on: March 18, 2007, 02:44:40 PM »

thanks to all. I will take your advice.
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buzzbee
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« Reply #10 on: March 18, 2007, 03:03:41 PM »

You may want to read here:
http://www.beemaster.com/honeybee/beehome.htm
and here
http://www.bushfarms.com/beesnewbees.htm
Great reading at both places!
Good luck and Happy Beekeeping cheesy
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tig
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« Reply #11 on: March 18, 2007, 06:58:46 PM »

look at the bright side....you now have 2 colonies to start with and one is free! if the other colony is bad natured you could always order a queen and requeen the hive.  its a good idea to start out beekeeping with at least 2 colonies in case one fails you have a back up.  goodluck with your beekeeping!
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #12 on: March 18, 2007, 07:25:54 PM »

I'd leave them alone.  They've found a good home.
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Atti
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« Reply #13 on: March 28, 2007, 11:45:50 AM »

Hi guys I am back. I finally got my start up kit and my bee gear. So I suited up and went to check on that old hive. I have never done this before so I was kind of nervous as I puffed smoke and lifted the lid. Well tried to lift the lid. The lid has a huge comb hanging from it. Great! I placed that super heavy thing on a crate next to me and watched as the bees buzzed around me. They were being very good considering I had just taken out a huge amount of bees with that comb. the bees seem happy and productive. There is a queen and new brood and pollen and honey! But this old hive has only one super. The bees are using a hole in the super instead of the entrance to coming in and out. I do not see how I can work a hive in this condition. Help!!!!
thanks Atti
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kathyp
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« Reply #14 on: March 28, 2007, 12:28:59 PM »

can you put a new super with foundation under the old one?  you can gradually get them to move into the new stuff. the next year or later this year, you can put on another new super and move them all the way into the new.  you'll probably need a queen excluder later on too....but that's a step that you can get help with later.   it may take a couple of season, but that might be the easiest thing to do.
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« Reply #15 on: March 28, 2007, 01:04:51 PM »

If the comb on the cover is where the queen and brood is,  I would cut it to fit into the new frames your bought.  Just cut it to fit inside the frame and but a couple of rubberband around the frame to hold the comb in.  The bees will attach the comb to the frame and then chew the rubber bands off.

Like I suggested before,  I would move what you can into your new equipment and put it in the same spot as the old hive.   The sooner you get them out of the old equipment the better off you will be.  If you let them continue to build comb haphazardly you'll end up with a bigger mess.

Good Luck.
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« Reply #16 on: March 28, 2007, 02:06:44 PM »

I think Robo is right on the money. Also there will be less bees to move and to deal with now before they build up later.
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Atti
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« Reply #17 on: March 28, 2007, 02:52:10 PM »

I was going to put one of the new supers on top of the exsisting hive but I did not know what to do with the lid situation. I do not know if I can cut off the comb. It is large, about the size of a full frame but irregular in size. I do not know if I will be able to manage the cutting stuff. It is full of bees, do I just brush them off. So I should just try to incorruprate the old and new until I can get the queen up in the new super?? I just place the new super on top of the old one. Nothing in between right!!!
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« Reply #18 on: March 28, 2007, 03:23:04 PM »

Yes brush the bees off and then take a large serrated knife and cut the comb to fit into the open frame.  Don't worry about getting it all,  if it is big enough cut it to go in 2 frames.   If your new super has just foundation, the bees are going to be hesitant to move up, and will probably continue to build haphazardly in the old.   
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Atti
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« Reply #19 on: March 29, 2007, 02:31:21 AM »

Robo
Okay, I did it but I must admit I was really scared. I opened up the hive and started examining what you had told me to do. There were soooo many bees on that comb. Remember this is only my second day at this. I am thinking to myself cut this in half. Well the bees where not very happy with my project and I lost some larva but I compeleted my task. My kids 5, 6, 10 where off at a distance watching and after some really tense moments the 5, 10 year  old girls decided to bail. My son who is 6 called out "mom I am still here." That is my bug loving boy! Well I guess I will check on the hive in a couple of days to see if the bees have started taking interest in the new stuff. Thanks for you advice hope all goes well.

Thanks Atti
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