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Author Topic: What to do  (Read 1333 times)

Offline beeginner

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What to do
« on: March 15, 2007, 09:51:28 PM »
Hi all my name is Carson and I woud like to have about 2 or 3 hives for the fun of it im only 18 years old and i have never done this befor I have 2 books one is " Starting Right with bees " the other one is " Frist Lessons in Beekeeping ". Then i have 8 mags with the gear and ever thing. The people my dad and I work for  just got some more land and the guy thay got it from is all most 80 years old and he has hives like crazy most of them are put up in the  milk barn that thay got with the land  so I askd them about the hives and thay told him and he said he will sell me some of them or all of them he has to have over 200 hives and supers and he has  a 30 to 80 frame extractor. Some of them need a lot of work others are ok I have not bee inside the barn  so im gonna ask him if it is ok. He has about 4 hives with bees and he has not workd them in about 4 or 5 years now he is just to sick. I want to get some of them without the bees in them but im woried about getting them and them haveing afb or efb or any other stuff like that. So I just need all the help and idea on what to do about this. Thanks all so much                          Carson

Offline pdmattox

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Re: What to do
« Reply #1 on: March 15, 2007, 09:58:16 PM »
You might be able to use a propane torch on the inside of the hive bodies to kill diesease.  Good luck.

Offline beeginner

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Re: What to do
« Reply #2 on: March 15, 2007, 10:08:24 PM »
Can I use a oxy/acetylene torch?

Offline Understudy

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Re: What to do
« Reply #3 on: March 15, 2007, 10:16:32 PM »
If the bees are healthy get the hives with the bees.

If he has had no disease you may not need to torch anything. If you are concerned about disease then go ahead.

Sincerely,
Brendhan
The status is not quo. The world is a mess and I just need to rule it. Dr. Horrible

Offline beeginner

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Re: What to do
« Reply #4 on: March 15, 2007, 10:25:04 PM »
I was going by his place last year on the atv and I lookd over and the bees was on the outside on the hive im like there gonna swarm any time now 20 mins I went by and thay was gone the only thing is he has not workd them in like 4 or 5 years but if thay have lasted this thay have to be ok. the hive im like there gonna swarm any time now 20 mins I went by and thay was gone the only thing is he has not workd them in like 4 or 5 years but if thay have lasted this thay have to be ok. At frist i was thinking about getting the ones with the bees but I got woried about them haveing something wrong.  Thanks for the help

Offline Stingtarget

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Re: What to do
« Reply #5 on: March 15, 2007, 11:14:42 PM »
Check with your local county extension office.  Here in NC if I were interested in purchasing an established hive with questionable history, the state bee inspector will examine the hives with me free of charge to look for anything that may be wrong with them before I buy them.  You can also ask at the extension office about a local bee club.  Find an experienced beekeeper who can act as your mentor the first year.  Most beekeepers are very excited about new beekeepers and young people with interest in the hobby.  Build some relationships in the bee circles.  You may even trade off some "apiary work" (lifting the heavy stuff) for an older beekeeper in exchange for the education / experience.  Don't be afraid to ask.  :)

Welcome to Beemaster!

Offline pdmattox

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Re: What to do
« Reply #6 on: March 15, 2007, 11:37:50 PM »
 
Quote
  Find an experienced beekeeper who can act as your mentor the first year.  Most beekeepers are very excited about new beekeepers and young people with interest in the hobby.  Build some relationships in the bee circles.  You may even trade off some "apiary work" (lifting the heavy stuff) for an older beekeeper in exchange for the education / experience.  Don't be afraid to ask.



Thats what I did and I have found a Great friend and mentor. Not to mention the jump in experince points of beekeeping.

Offline beeginner

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Re: What to do
« Reply #7 on: March 16, 2007, 12:31:08 AM »
Just a little wile ageo I calld the lady I help wit her race horses and I told her what I was wanting to do and she said you know the state bee inspector lives just out of town im like no way and she gave me his # and name so im gonna try and call him this week. I know there is people hear  that has bees I see there honey for sell and ever thing but if I can talk to the the state bee inspector  he will tell me of ever one hear that has hives and maybe he might let me help hear in town for a year I hope.  Thanks for talking to me ever one. :)

Offline indypartridge

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Re: What to do
« Reply #8 on: March 16, 2007, 08:19:39 AM »
I agree with the suggestion to find a local mentor.  Here's a link - you might want to see if there are any local groups near you.

http://arbeekeepers.org/local.htm


Offline beeginner

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Re: What to do
« Reply #9 on: March 16, 2007, 01:35:46 PM »
Thanks for the link there is two in Mountain Home  just north of hear and Shirley just south im all ways in Shirley in the river fishing or canoneing. Im really shocked that Shirley has one there only like 300 people in that town.  Thanks for the help.           Carson

 

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