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Author Topic: too much honey  (Read 1448 times)
filmmlif
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« on: March 07, 2007, 01:30:58 AM »

i inspected my hives today and both of them had 8 frames full off honey in the top deep. the bottom deep also had 5 or 6 frames of honey/pollen. here's my question; can there be too much honey pollen and not enough room for brood? thanks.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #1 on: March 07, 2007, 07:04:59 AM »

They will burn up a frame of pollen and a frame of nectar to raise a frame of brood.  It will empty out quickly if they are rearing brood.  They will clear a space quickly for the queen to lay if they want her to.  If there is no queen they will not.  Are you sure there's a laying queen?
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Michael Bush
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filmmlif
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« Reply #2 on: March 07, 2007, 08:07:06 PM »

there is a laying queen...i saw brood in all the hives.
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Billy The Beekeeper
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« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2007, 09:05:03 AM »

I truely think there is to much honey in a hive unless it becomes a problem for the bees to raise brood which is very unlikely cause they end up usin it so im gonna have to say no  Smiley                       afro
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Experienced BeeKeeper Cheesy
limyw
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« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2007, 10:21:09 AM »

Population will drop in 2-3 weeks times if egg laying is confined due to excessive honey stock. Quickly extract them out so queen would has more space to go.
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lyw
Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #5 on: March 10, 2007, 05:23:40 PM »

If you have extra drawn comb in frames of the same depth just swap out a few so that the queen has 3 or 4 frames with which to begin laying.  Once she starts the hive will make much more room quickly as the production of brood uses more food storage in less time than anyother activity.  4 frames of brood now will equate to twice that many in a few weeks and you have a steady increase in hive strength as you go.  You also avoid the possibility of removing to much of the stores which can cause a dip in hive buildup.
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Stingtarget
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« Reply #6 on: March 11, 2007, 11:06:39 PM »

You could take two frames of the honey/pollen from the brood box and exchange it for the two outermost drawn frames in a weaker hive.  The weaker hive would appreciate the extra honey/pollen in the brood area and  they really don't need the room to expand yet anyway.  Could help give them a boost in brood rearing.
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