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Author Topic: wood preservative  (Read 3068 times)
beewhisper
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« on: March 01, 2007, 08:54:45 PM »

does anyone treat new,unpainted hives  with copper napthate?How about, does anyone use screws instead of nails? would this make the hive stronger?How about if a person used wood stain instead of paint? just wondering what to do to make a hive last as long as possible.Not exactly loaded with money.Thanks for any info!
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Apis629
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« Reply #1 on: March 01, 2007, 09:31:38 PM »

I either soak or dip the parts of my supers, bottom boards and covers in copper napthate under the tradename "coppertox".  After that, I let them sit out to dry and air off for probably a day or two.  Then, I assemble them with those 2.5inch galvanized nails, and paint the outside with whatever paint I have on hand.  Sometimes it's a white semigloss, last time it was old deck paint.  The deck paint actually holds up best out of what I've seen.  To make them last as long as possible, nail or screw them and put wood glue in the joints.  Don't forget to soak the wood in the coppertox and paint the exterior well.  That should give them a good, long working life.
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JRS
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« Reply #2 on: March 01, 2007, 09:38:50 PM »

well speaking as a carpenter,as far as wood stain goes if you stain your deck for instance it is recomended you restain every other year,treated wood or not.The main problem with wood lasting even if it is sealed is the sun warping it out of shape opening up gaps and thats when you have a problem with water.Or the contracting and exspanding of wood causes the same problem.The best solution is a tight grained wood like eastern pine that doesn"t give as much or a wood like cedar or cypress that is naturaly water retardant(not proof).If you go with good wood to begin with it will save you money in the long run.As far as screwsthey will hold tight but they won"t move with the wood and if the wood you use expands and contracts a lot due to loose grains it will more than likely split.Nails will give you the holding you need and let the wood move naturally.After say a year or two of being outside the wood pretty much stops movement and all is well.So in my opinion good wood,nails or even staples and just a good coat of paint will last you 3-5 years no problem.Hope that helps. grin
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The only stupid question is the question unasked,thanx for the help.
Zoot
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« Reply #3 on: March 01, 2007, 10:24:53 PM »

I use screws all the time (stainless steel) but they are an expensive indulgence. Also, Newcomber is spot on on all points. They could concievably cause a box panel to split. Pre-drilling is mandatory obviously. I use them mainly because I'm a cabinet-maker snob and I simply like the look.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #4 on: March 02, 2007, 06:19:13 AM »

>does anyone treat new,unpainted hives  with copper napthate?

A hive is a food container.  I don't want anything on the inside of the hive that I wouldn't put in my mouth.  I wouldn't put copper napthenate  in my mouth.  I'm going to boil some of mine in gum rosin and paraffin this year.

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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Apis629
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« Reply #5 on: March 02, 2007, 08:19:50 AM »

I wouldn't put nails in my mouth either.

I see my hives as a dwelling for bees, and, just as I would to my own home, I take steps to ensure that it lasts as long as possible.
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Drone
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« Reply #6 on: March 02, 2007, 09:33:14 AM »

A very quick search lead me to this statement...

The Environmental Protection Agency lists Copper Naphthenate as a general use pesticide. Unlike other restricted use preservatives, it can be used for both pressure treating and sold as a field preservative.

Not something I want near my bees or my honey.

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Zoot
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« Reply #7 on: March 02, 2007, 11:07:27 AM »

MB,

What are you boiling? Broken down hive components?
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likes2grill
Dan
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« Reply #8 on: March 02, 2007, 11:52:09 AM »

I used boiled linseed oil and gav-nails on my hives.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #9 on: March 02, 2007, 12:22:26 PM »

>I wouldn't put nails in my mouth either.

I have often.  Usually finish nails.

>What are you boiling? Broken down hive components?

New hives.  I quit painting some time ago, but I'm expanding and buying a lot of new equipment, so I decided I'd do a paraffin/gum dip.

http://entomology.unl.edu/beekpg/tidings/btid1995/btiddc95.htm#Item4

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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
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