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Author Topic: Do I need supers already...?  (Read 2982 times)
kensfarm
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Location: Thurmont, MD


« Reply #20 on: March 01, 2007, 04:24:44 PM »

Steve.. I think Kathy was talking about Randy's article in ABJ. 

Kathy.. I'm not sure.. but I know he sacrificed one hive for the test. 
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #21 on: March 01, 2007, 04:33:19 PM »

If you want to treat (with anything) I suggest you read and try to understand this:

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesvarroatreatments.htm

You'll find that marginal treatments when there is brood will sometimes not appear that effective even though they are getting rid of some mites.  You'll also see why treating when there is not brood in the hive is MUCH more effective.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
SteveSC
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Location: Woodruff,South Carolina


« Reply #22 on: March 01, 2007, 08:29:59 PM »

 
Quote
You'll find that marginal treatments when there is brood will sometimes not appear that effective even though they are getting rid of some mites.  You'll also see why treating when there is not brood in the hive is MUCH more effective.

Maybe this wasn't addressed to me but I'll add a comment to it. I got 5 of the 8 hives I have last spring from an old fella that has since pasted on.  The other 3 were swarm captures I suspect came from the same bee yard.  Sam ( the ole' fella ) never treated for anything and after he was gone I checked his hives and all his equipment that he had stored away on the property.  It was a mess.  Moths were killing his hives left and right - he had 40+ hives - I would say 20 were killed off with in 2 mons. due to a massive moth infestation.  There were moths flying everywhere in the storage areas - you could lift the top covers on any hives and they would just go everywhere.

A friend and I saved about 15 hives - we barely saved them after changing out frames that were infested with moths with just frozen frames.  Some of the ones we saved were pulled from sure death had we not got involved.  Some hives are still sitting where they were - the frames complete encased in moth webs.  Sam just didn't have the time - the information - the will or whatever to take care of the hives anymore.  He had them for about 8 yrs. when I got them.

Having said that and not knowing the history of of mites at his place I felt I needed to treat these hives at least once with something strong to kill off any on coming mite problems.  I don't have a problem now and these hives are doing good from all I can tell.  Last yr. I would not have taken a bet that any of them would make it past Aug. - we're talking a moth breeding facility... shocked

As I posted before - I won't treat for something I don't have.  Hopefully I won't need to use anymore mite begone.
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Steve in SC


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Michael Bush
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« Reply #23 on: March 01, 2007, 08:49:34 PM »

>Maybe this wasn't addressed to me but I'll add a comment to it.

It's not addressed to any in particular, but sometimes people think something is ineffective because they don't see a noticeable drop in the mite population.  Sometimes not seeing an INCREASE is an improvement.  Smiley  But the other point is that it is much more effective to treat when there is no brood, if you can plan that either ahead or arrange that. 

On another note, a good time to arrange that is just before the flow.  If you confine or remove the queen two weeks before the main flow then when the main flow his there is no open brood.  In another week or so there is no brood at all.  If you're using powdered sugar you can treat with that, then, and you can enjoy a better harvest because of the nurse bees being recruited for the flow, and you get a break in the brood cycle.  Release the queen (or if you removed her, just let them finish rearing theirs) and you now have a lot less mites and a lot more honey.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
kensfarm
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Location: Thurmont, MD


« Reply #24 on: March 02, 2007, 09:14:35 AM »

Hi Steve..  the only time I've seen Moths flying like that is from grain storage..  once you stirred them up.. the chickens would run around and chase & eat them

If you're looking for something to read..  Mike has a lot of good info. on his site.. even some books! 

Happy Friday.. hope you have a good day!   


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