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Author Topic: History Question? :-)  (Read 1187 times)
kathyp
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« on: February 26, 2007, 02:05:36 PM »

Now I am officially old  Undecided  One of the kids I used to work with is now in college.  She's taking some kind of history class.  They are examining the '60's.  1960's!!!!!!!!!  That's history now  sad .

Anyway, she wanted my perspective on the late 60's early 70's.  The questions came at a good time because I'd just watched a couple of shows about the drug culture of the 60's and  the Berkley counter culture.  I had been thinking about it anyway.

I realize that your view of the 60's and 70's depends very much on where you were at the time and what you were doing.

As it happened, I lived the end of the 60's in Oakland. CA and the beginning of the 70's in KY.  I have some pretty vivid memories of the times.  wondered if there is anyone else who remembers and what impact the times had on you?

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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

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buzzbeejr
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« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2007, 06:37:12 PM »

I wasn't around then but in music we are getting into 1960's music,so that's about all i know about it but my dad might be able to help (buzzbee) he was born in the early sixties.
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« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2007, 08:06:21 PM »

I was born in 67 so woodstock wasn't in the cards for me. I however was living in Los Angeles at age 6-8 years old. I was living in manhattan beach, ca.. At that time it was filled with hippie communes. My parents were squares. Father was a WWII vet with my mother 23 years his junior.  I very much remember the times and the place. While my parents weren't the long haired, tye dyed type. Their beliefs were that people had a right to express themselves. So while dad wore a dress shirt and tie to work. He understood the anti war movement and the changes taking place. He wasn't a fan of the legalization of drugs but a persons right to to free speech was important to him. It was an amazing time for me. I would hang with hippies on the beach or at the cafe. I would also attend company functions with my parents very square events.

I did things in my youth and traveled to places by myself that my wife can't understand. I could be 10 miles form home at 6. I could go fishing at the pier or slide down the dunes at Sand Dune park.

I once heard it very well put by wife in her Lit class were someone said all the problems we have today stemmed from the 60's. My wife fired back does that include the civil rights movement. The gentlemans ego splattered against the back wall. I realized many years later that my parents made sure I was exposed to many people and cultures. I went to school with kids who were handicap. I had friends of many different cultures and races. My father I learned later on was a big proponet of civil rights. He didn't march with MLK, but when he was in the army they practiced segrgation. When my father was made a DI he insisted on being allowed to integrate.

I attended a funeral for a soldier in Vietnam as a kid. I didn't understand the concept of the war at the time. However I quickly after that started to get an idea.

So somewhere between the innocence of a PB&J with my family and friends on the beach and the killing fields of Vietnam, I started to form my identity.

The end of the war, the resignation of Nixon, the commies, the bomb, at one side.
The CB fad, death to disco, Saturday morning cartoons, the bicenntenial, the return of the two dollar bill and those quarters at the other side.

So while I didn't do any love ins or the monteray blues festival, haight ashbury, the diggers, or particpate in the protest at Kent University. Those events had reaching effects on things that impacted me later.

On a sideline note I returned to manhattan beach for a visit about a year ago. The hippie communes are gone. The prices on the homes is through th roof. $2,500 a month rental is not unusual. However the cafe Sloopy's is still there. Moon's market is still there. Although Moon retired a few years back.

I went up to San Fran and hit the the haight and laughed when I saw a GAP store there. It still hangs onto some of the ideals that came out of the 60's and 70's but they have changed in not so subtle ways over the many years. I go to the castro district now.

On a side note one of the other things that was really big at the time was skateboarding. The dogtown documentary goes over that quite well. It also doesn't
butter up the fact that the town they lived in was a cesspool. If manhattan beach was bad this place was worse. I was to young to hang with them and they were a bit far. But the effect they had in my area made skateboarding a big deal. it was really funny because eventually I ended up in Melbourne Beach, Fl were Ocean Ave surfboards and Fox skateboards were the east coast version of the z-boys. I never had the skills to be a good skateboarder but I certainly did try many times.

I remember when the local surf shop put a motor on the skateboard in Manhattan Beach, the newspapers went wild.

It was an incredible time for so many reasons.

Sincerely,
Brendhan
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« Reply #3 on: February 27, 2007, 11:25:47 AM »

When I was very young, my family lived in a rural part of north-central Pennsylvania, and in the valleys of the Allegheny mountains, not much reached us.  We received three TV stations from an antenna way on top of the mountain, had a weekly newspaper, a movie theater than got films on third release, and a local radio station that signed off at sundown.  Walter Cronkite told us the way is was, and gave us the body count for dinner each evening.  Thank goodness for AM radio skip at night! 

From 1967 to 1971, when I was in my early teens, my family lived in Delaware, and I got a job delivering the Bulletin out of Philadelphia.  I read every issue I delivered, front to back, and soaked it all in.  I read about LBJ falling victim to his own Vietnam policy, Lt. Calley and My Lai, Commander Bucher and the Pueblo, MacNamara, Christmas cease-fires, the SDS demonstrations, the Weatherman bomb factory explosion, the Chicago Democratic Convention, Abbie "Steal This Book" Hoffman (I had a copy, along with Betty Friedan's book), Patty Hearst and the SLA, the Black Panthers, "Cassius Clay", Jackson State, Kent State, and of course, Woodstock.  My daddy marched with Bobby in Wilmington, and my mom was escorted from Delaware State campus by the national guard the day MLK was killed.  I hung with the brothers at the seminary on Sunday nights, listening to music of the "Woodstock Nation" and discussing the world around us in dark, incense-filled back rooms.  I had hopes that I would grow old in a better world than what we got.

My daughter and I went to see "Bobby" at the movies, and I cried.  She looked about the theater at other's reactions and commented that it must be a generational thing.

The 60s shaped everything I do, think and feel.  Are our present problems rooted in the 60s?  No, I believe our problems are the result of failing to follow through on what was started.  Were peace, personal freedom and dignity, ecology and good stewardship of the Earth all just fads, the wasted exuberance of youth?  What a sorry group of humans that believes such a thing.  Then again, maybe it's the result of a personality defect of a generation -- immediate gratification won out over longer vision.  (Is this why our parent are called "the greatest generation"?)  Abbie is dead and Jerry Rubin lives on.  Alex Keaton became our new hero.  We plowed under the corn fields and orchards to put up our McMansions, and now we wonder why the spuge from ConAgra makes us sick.  We view the world through the corporate media that has become the centerpiece of our "family" room ("that g*dd*m noisy box," as Jubal Hershaw would say), and wonder why our kids don't know where Arkansas is.  We fill our days with distractions, running here and there and obsessing about this celebrity or that object d'jour, and wonder why we don't have enough time to get a good night's sleep.  Out "idols" are chosen by phone-in vote and "reality" is unscripted but no less contrived.  We hand the presidency to someone we think might be fun to drink beer with and give an academy award to the guy who's seriously concerned about our planet becoming an oven.  We don't even WANT to know the body count anymore.  Are we insane?  What are we spending our lives running from?  Do we think that what we can do will make no difference?  Is that what we thought in the 60s?

I don't know when the 60s ended; there are so many events that could signal the end.  I do believe the spark remains, though.  Some of the old hippies are still around, flying under the radar and keeping the faith.  Sometimes a little, sometimes a lot.  "By their deeds ye shall know them."  Brittany won't sing about it, but Willie might.

I could write a book about this topic.  But that's all for now.  Do you grok?   Wink

-- Kris
   
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« Reply #4 on: February 27, 2007, 03:00:45 PM »


I could write a book about this topic.  But that's all for now.  Do you grok?   Wink

-- Kris
   
Stranger in a Strange Land! I grok spock buttons. The space race. I remember watching the lift off of of the last two Apollo missions. I remember doing the a report on Skylab. There was so much going on.

Sincerely,
Brendhan
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Jerrymac
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« Reply #5 on: February 27, 2007, 06:06:05 PM »

I will admit my age. Born April 5, 1954. I'm 52 right now. I remember very little about the sixties other than I went to school. Yeah I heard about drugs and Vietnam in the seventies but never had to worry about it.

You people got good memories. Course I don't work too hard at trying to remember anything.
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kathyp
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« Reply #6 on: February 27, 2007, 06:41:07 PM »

she and i talked for a long time.  she wants to write something different from what her classmates will write.

i gave her a few ideas that i find interesting and asked her to let me know what she decides.  add some if you think of them.  i'll pass them on to her.  she has a little time to work on this.  so far, they have watched "Hair" and talked about the drug culture.

one idea was to examine the impact of the generations before.  the fact that the parents and grandparents of the boomers had known nothing but war, depression, and more war.... from the indian wars through ww2.  that after ww2 there was more of a move to the suburbs, industrialization, and more emphasis on education past high school.  after re-reading "children of men" i think of the boomers and something like the Omegas.  Kind of pampered and sheltered from the pain of their parents past.

another idea was to investigate outside influences on the separate movements of the 60's.  there is no historical precedent for revolution without a focal point, but in the 60's we had at least the attempt with multiple focal points.  to what extent might the KGBs very active programs on our campuses, international propaganda, and hollywood, have contributed? McCarthy wasn't wrong, he just suffered from very poor execution of purpose.

what brought the civil rights movement to a head at that time?  how much might the military service of blacks have contributed to the feeling that it was time they be recognized as equal citizens?  having had the chance to travel and gains skills that they might not otherwise have gotten, did they come to realize that education and an end to discrimination were things that they had earned the right to claim?  if they were willing to risk their lives for their country, why not for equality?

last idea was to look at the 60's from the point of view of someone like me, who was a military brat and pretty much saw the nasty side of the 60's.  also, having lived in Oakland in the late 60's i missed that whole "peace" movement thing.

everybody knows what happened.  everybody knows the impact.  the why is more interesting to me.

i think i have more thoughts on this, but cold meds are making me fuzzy  smiley  i hope she doesn't take any of these ideas and get an F in the class.  i'll feel bad.  bucking CW is not very popular.
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
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