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Author Topic: SO, About that mouse !!!  (Read 4780 times)
Cindi
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« Reply #20 on: February 22, 2007, 11:44:44 PM »

Vermin!!!!  There is no place in any place for these.  I don't care what form.  They carry disease and devastate any kind of stored foods, whether the food is for human or animal.  We live on a farm, many different forms of life and no vermin is welcome.  That includes the squirrels, (the big black ones or the cute little Douglass squirrel).   Even when these enter my yard, I sic the dogs after them.  Our dogs never even come close to catching them, but they scare the daylights out of the squirrels and they stay away for awhile.

I think that we have cats that live in the barns, they help to keep the vermin under control, I know that.

This reminds me of a story.  Yup, a story comes our way.

A few years ago, when I operated my small flower nursery, it was a hot, late spring day.  We have quite a large area behind one of my greenhouses that has been filled with road mulch, to make parking easier for the clients.  Alongside the periphery of the gravelled area, I saw a dead rat.  It must have dehydrated in the hot sun, and being in a rather obsure place, had flattened down to very thin.

I was looking at this flattened, rather large rat, and it moved.  Impossible.  It was dead and flat.  Of course, me with my curious nature, picked up a stick and touched the resurrected vermin.  It felt as dead and flat as it looked.  I flipped it over.  EEEKS!!!  On the underside of this flattened, disgusting hunk of junk were 3 or 4 rather large orange and black coloured bugs.  These insects didn't even move when I lifted the rat.  I was disgusted and got a bag to put this rat into and disposed of it.  I presume the bugs ran home.

To this day I do not really know what was going on with these obviously very strong bugs.  I suspect that they were going to piggyback this wonderful meal to their home, wherever their home may have been and feed their family.  They obviously were in this catch of food together, a family event.

That was the only time I have ever seen this species of insect.  I wish that in those days I would have had my digital camera, I would have taken a picture with great pleasure, to examine the insect further and with any luck, identified it.  Oooh, the bugs, gotta love them.  Best of days.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #21 on: February 23, 2007, 11:03:00 AM »

Here is something about some rodents;

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070223/ap_on_re_us/restaurant_rats;_ylt=AmBG.Tky.qN4MgCvNhyS45Ws0NUE
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« Reply #22 on: February 23, 2007, 11:21:05 AM »

Hey Cindi,

My prairie dogs feelings were hurt by your rant.


I am talking to them now but this may take a while.
Now don't you feel guilty for grouping my cute lovable praire dogs with you idea of vermin infested rodents? I have 12 prairie dogs.
My african pygmy hedgehog was not offended.


 grin
God I love being sarcastic.
Hey Cindi, have great day.

Sincerely,
Brendhan
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Jerrymac
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« Reply #23 on: February 23, 2007, 11:27:54 AM »

We have a lot of those prairie dogs out here. Probably millions.
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« Reply #24 on: February 23, 2007, 11:40:15 AM »

Jerrymac
PDs are not indeginous to Florida. Mine are rescues. I am on an exotic wildlife rescue list with Busch wildlife sanctuary. People use to be able to buy them as pets and then ended up not being able to care for them. So my wife and I take them in.
http://www.understudy.net/pdcage.html

I need to update the photos.

Sincerely,
Brendhan
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Jerrymac
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« Reply #25 on: February 23, 2007, 04:09:11 PM »

I knew they weren't indigenous to Florida. But you know what you said about that frog? Let a few of those dogs loose and you will have a bunch of the furry cute critters...... everywhere.
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rainbow sunflower  Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak.   rainbow sunflower

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« Reply #26 on: February 23, 2007, 05:18:30 PM »

I knew they weren't indigenous to Florida. But you know what you said about that frog? Let a few of those dogs loose and you will have a bunch of the furry cute critters...... everywhere.
Breeding PDs in captivity is very difficult. In my 10 plus years with them I have had no litters.

Sincerely,
Brendhan
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« Reply #27 on: February 23, 2007, 06:39:49 PM »

She must one powerfully ugly prarie dog. Try getting him drunk.
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Jerrymac
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« Reply #28 on: February 23, 2007, 07:33:05 PM »

Breeding PDs in captivity is very difficult. In my 10 plus years with them I have had no litters.

Turn them loose in your back yard. Or come over here and catch a few more. Perhaps they need competition. Some animals will breed only to the space they have. Not sure if PDs are one of those animals.
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« Reply #29 on: February 23, 2007, 07:43:58 PM »

Breeding PDs in captivity is very difficult. In my 10 plus years with them I have had no litters.

Turn them loose in your back yard. Or come over here and catch a few more. Perhaps they need competition. Some animals will breed only to the space they have. Not sure if PDs are one of those animals.

No, turning them loose in the backyard would be the same as importing bufo toads.
PDs require large areas to meet breeding needs. Next year they will get a bigger cage and we will see what happens then.

I would love to come and rescue a few but if they aren't on someone's property I leave them alone. They are a protected species now. Due to population decline. You may see lots of them but they use to range all the way up to colarado. There use to be millions of them. Not any more. I would love to have them breed so we could be part of the reintroduction to the wild program. So many other species are dependant on them as food. With the decline of PD populations other animals have been hurt by it also.

It's kinda like the cut outs I do for bees. I don't want to kill the bees I want to move them to some place that wants them. And I want them to flourish.

Sincerely,
Brendhan
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« Reply #30 on: February 24, 2007, 12:51:16 AM »

I think we drifted off topic.... BUT....

I was wondering if the PD could/would reproduce if they can't get way down in the ground like they do in the wild.

Yeah I had heard they were a protected species, and people around here wonder why. As a child the only prairie dogs I knew of in Lubbock were in a prairie dog town. A walled in community of dogs at a park. And some dogs out on a friend of my grandfathers farm. We would go out there and delete a few for the guy every chance we got. Bang Bang.

But now they are all over the place. The city has this place where they spray waste water (treated sewer water) for the plant life to take out some of the nitrogen. The PDs got so bad out there the city council started fearing the water was getting too deep into the ground and polluting the water table. So an expert trapper was called out to get rid of the critters. Anyone with the proper license or permits could go there and capture as many as they wanted to for relocation up to a certain date, then the terminator was to come finish them off.... humanly of course.

But I am sure we have a few million just in the city limits of Lubbock.   
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« Reply #31 on: February 24, 2007, 08:23:53 AM »

I think we drifted off topic.... BUT....

I was wondering if the PD could/would reproduce if they can't get way down in the ground like they do in the wild.

That may be part of the issue. That is why I designing a new cage for next year. Also for me part of the issue now is the age of my PDs some of which are 10 years old. That is almost a record for PDs.

Quote
Yeah I had heard they were a protected species, and people around here wonder why. As a child the only prairie dogs I knew of in Lubbock were in a prairie dog town. A walled in community of dogs at a park. And some dogs out on a friend of my grandfathers farm. We would go out there and delete a few for the guy every chance we got. Bang Bang.
They are protected because as many as you see is less than .01% of what the population use to be.

Quote
But now they are all over the place. The city has this place where they spray waste water (treated sewer water) for the plant life to take out some of the nitrogen. The PDs got so bad out there the city council started fearing the water was getting too deep into the ground and polluting the water table. So an expert trapper was called out to get rid of the critters. Anyone with the proper license or permits could go there and capture as many as they wanted to for relocation up to a certain date, then the terminator was to come finish them off.... humanly of course.

But I am sure we have a few million just in the city limits of Lubbock.   

This is what happens when humans develop and expand. We just force out whatever is there. It is a bummer that the waste water and the PDs are in conflict.
I would like to know the results of the well tests.

I know you get to see the PDs almost everyday in the wild where you live. For as long as I have been raising them and as much as I travel. My wife and I have only seen them once in the wild. In a perserve in Sayre, OK. That is because most of their habitat has been developed over.

It would be cool if they could take some of your population and relocate them. I don't know how realistic that is either.

Sincerely,
Brendhan
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« Reply #32 on: February 25, 2007, 12:09:53 AM »

Jerrymac
http://www.weloveprairiedogs.com/relocation.html

Two members of the PD list are working in Lubbock.

Sincerely,
Brendhan
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Cindi
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« Reply #33 on: February 25, 2007, 01:02:55 AM »

Brendhan.  Gotta laugh at you.  I just hope that your prairie dogs can understand your lingo!!!

My hat off to you for animal rescue, that is a wonderful thing to do and I totally admire people that are rescuers, be it human, animal, insect, any kind of rescue work.  A good thing, you will have a good life.  People get what they give.  I firmly believe in that.

But, I really don't care how cute you think your prairie dogs are.  My opinioin sticks.  I don't like rodents, of any sort.  I actually don't even like cats, now that may rustle some feathers for sure.

Dogs, horses, barnyard animals, those are my bag, love all of these.

So Brendhan, carry on with the sarcasim, I can take it!!!  LOL.  Best of great days.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #34 on: February 25, 2007, 05:24:29 AM »

AHH! what is not to like about cats?  Cindi, come on now...I seem to always inherit cats wherever I move.  I have had two tomcats that were my favorite companions.  When we moved out here the old lady left her cat for us.  SHE named him cat, we got harassed by the vets every time about that but he was the prototype so...he loved to bring gifts home with him and show off which stef was not too keen on...but he was awesome.   Last year we were out hiking (cat and I), and came across a bear.  I learned to breath again after a few moments while walking backwards, and cat CHARGED after the bear!  When he finally came home he was so puffed up I had to laugh.  I understand why agricultural societies like the ancient egyptians mummified cats and built temples in their honor.  They are quite seriously the best pets.  I think most people hate cats because they have known the pampered domesticated cats.  All the best cats I have known were allowed outside whenever they wanted to hunt, and curled up by the fire when they were done.
As a disclaimer I will add that I do believe crazy cat lady sickness is a real and horrible disease affecting millions of unbalanced women around the world.  Again, not the cats fault. 
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Cindi
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« Reply #35 on: February 25, 2007, 09:15:39 AM »

Steve, I am very impressed with how you hang your clothes (LOL).  Where would like be without a clothesline?  Nothing nicer than the sheets that air in the freshness of the breeze.

Anyways, OK, I take back what I said about the cats.  I have only known domesticated, indoorsy type cats.  They always seem so arrogant that I just had no use for them.  Never had cats personally, especially an outdoor, barn type cat.  Maybe they are different.  One should not judge that book by its cover.

I think that the reason why I have not had any cats is because of the dogs I have had over the years.  I know dogs and cats get along, sometimes, but I just never bothered to get one to see if they would with mine.  We have for the most of our married lives lived on farming lands, but not had cats.  Best of the best day.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #36 on: February 25, 2007, 09:28:03 AM »

Anyways, OK, I take back what I said about the cats.  I have only known domesticated, indoorsy type cats.  They always seem so arrogant that I just had no use for them.  Never had cats personally, especially an outdoor, barn type cat.  Maybe they are different.  One should not judge that book by its cover.

Cats are arrogant, they have a right to be. They know they are better than the rest.
 grin

It is very funny how the power structure takes place in my house. The dog is the lowest on the hierarchy. Despite the fact that he is the biggest. He receives more abuse and bullying from the cats than should be allowed. He walks by a cat and they just take a pop shot at him, no reason other than to be mean. However the PDs rule the roost. Make no bones about it. The PDs take crap from none. The cats use to come up in like a hunt position to the PDs and the PDs would turn around and stare the cat down.

The cat once made a pop shot at a PD and the PD turned around and barked at the cat. Then came back with 3 more and they attacked the cat. A PD with a mouthful of cat fur and standing proud was one of the funniest things I have ever seen. The cats give the PDs their space. The dog also respects the PDs they once bit him on the paw after he licked one.

The only time I have seen the PDs really scared was when I took them to the ren fest and we went by the raptor show. The PDs saw those bird and barked alarms and hid in the backpack and didn't come out for over an hour.


Sincerely,
Brendhan
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Cindi
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« Reply #37 on: February 25, 2007, 09:58:38 AM »

Brendhan.  Now that little story about the PDs is funny!!!  They surely have the power.  I didn't realize that they barked.

My daughter had ferrats at one point in time.  I guess they are a rodent too.  So I have to take that back about the hatred of rodents.  Man I am taking alot back this morning.  Sometimes I just  speak too freely without thinking I guess.

Now these ferrats were a blast.  So darn cute and man do they have a playful attitude.  Our dogs did not like them one little bit and were terribly frightened when the ferrats came over to "play."  Funny thing.  When my daughter gave her ferrats to a friend, she found all kinds of things that they had taken and hidden all over her house, in the strangest places. 

I love the scent of the ferrat, they were de-stinked (lol), but they still had a very strong aroma.  The scent of these critters reminded me of honey.  It seems many things remind me of that smell.

When I was a youngster we had a spotted skunk, it was a rodent too I guess.  It was a tiny little thing, not the big civic cats that really can be big here.  (I still can't get over how the skunk cabbage that grows in our ravine really does smell like skunk spray).  this spotted skunk smell kind of like honey too.  Yikes!!!!  Now that sounds too wierd, honey scents.  Corn pollen, ferrats, skunks.  Maybe my sense of scent has gone off to the dark side, lol.  Best of best days.  Cindi

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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #38 on: February 25, 2007, 10:17:09 AM »

Brendhan.  Now that little story about the PDs is funny!!!  They surely have the power.  I didn't realize that they barked.

My daughter had ferrats at one point in time.  I guess they are a rodent too.  So I have to take that back about the hatred of rodents.  Man I am taking alot back this morning.  Sometimes I just  speak too freely without thinking I guess.
No, ferrets are weasels. Black footed ferrets eat PDs.

Quote
Now these ferrats were a blast.  So darn cute and man do they have a playful attitude.  Our dogs did not like them one little bit and were terribly frightened when the ferrats came over to "play."  Funny thing.  When my daughter gave her ferrats to a friend, she found all kinds of things that they had taken and hidden all over her house, in the strangest places. 
I had a roomate many years ago who had two. Little thieves would take any shiney object they could.

Quote
I love the scent of the ferrat, they were de-stinked (lol), but they still had a very strong aroma.  The scent of these critters reminded me of honey.  It seems many things remind me of that smell.
They still smell but not as bad. If you bath them and keep the litter box clean there isn't really any smell unless you bury your nose in their fur.

Quote
When I was a youngster we had a spotted skunk, it was a rodent too I guess.  It was a tiny little thing, not the big civic cats that really can be big here.  (I still can't get over how the skunk cabbage that grows in our ravine really does smell like skunk spray).  this spotted skunk smell kind of like honey too.  Yikes!!!!  Now that sounds too wierd, honey scents.  Corn pollen, ferrats, skunks.  Maybe my sense of scent has gone off to the dark side, lol.  Best of best days.  Cindi
Skunks are mamals.
And they are awesome. I love it when they are mad and stomp their front feet as a warning.

Okay today's lesson plan for Cindi is to write 100 times:
Just because it is small and furry doesn't mean it is a rodent.

No copy/paste Smiley


Sincerely,
Brendhan
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Cindi
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« Reply #39 on: February 25, 2007, 10:30:38 AM »

Brendhan, you are so mean.  I am off to write my lines.  Haven't done that since grade school, but I have to practice my penmanship skills.  They are somewhat lacking since I hardly ever sit with pen in hand anymore. 

I have learned some valuable lessons from my teacher (LOL), Brendhan, appreciate the enlightenment.

I was feeding the birds yesterday underneath the hazelnut tree and heard kind of a scratching sound.  I looked into the tree and there was a Douglas squirrel sitting there looking at me.  They are brazen miracles of nature.  He did not flinch and inch and I just ignored him.  The seed that I set out and sprinkle on the ground is very small, but I also have a bag of black oil seed sunflower that I mix in with it.  That was what the squirrel was after.  So be it.  He must have been hungry and I cannot turn away any hungry mouths.  So he had his time and off he went.

When we gathered walnuts from my other sister who lives about an hours drive away, there were many nuts that were not quite good enough for drying and storage.  So I would throw them by the wayside after we were done cleaning them.  The squirrels must have had a wonderful time, because the next day, ALL of those disgarded were no where to be seen.  They did a nice job of clean up.  Best day.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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