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Author Topic: SO, About that mouse !!!  (Read 4657 times)
rayb
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« on: February 22, 2007, 10:05:32 AM »

My previous post asked if letting mice stay until warmer weather would be ok. I'm not sure I got an answer other than I should have put mouse excluders on. I will next time!

I cleaned the debris tray yesterday and , today there are about a dozen 1/8 inch droppings. Someone is here.

So, can the intruders stay till warmer weather or should they be evicted sooner?

Thanks, Ray
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Jerrymac
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« Reply #1 on: February 22, 2007, 11:08:13 AM »

Well they do chew up the comb and they are carnivorous and will eat the bees if they get hungry enough.
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« Reply #2 on: February 22, 2007, 11:30:32 AM »

This question is going to seem wrong on so many levels. However my intent is in order to help you get an answer to your question.

Could take a picture of the excrement and post it?

I can see the mods cringing now.

Sincerely,
Brendhan
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KONASDAD
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« Reply #3 on: February 22, 2007, 11:42:16 AM »

If you think a mouse is about, just put a mouse trap w/in inches outside of where you suspect the mouse gets in and out of hive. The mouse gets caught outside hive, end of problem. That way the hive is not disturbed at all.
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« Reply #4 on: February 22, 2007, 11:51:33 AM »

Quote
This question is going to seem wrong on so many levels

scat id is an old, respected, and almost lost skill smiley 

i like the mouse trap idea. 
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

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« Reply #5 on: February 22, 2007, 01:25:49 PM »

I can't kill anything, so I would probably throw some sunflower seeds in a nearby area to make sure the mice/mouse have food and they don't eat anything in your hive. I am new at the beekeeping business so I don't know if there are health issues related to having them in your hive.  If it is very cold in your area, I would try to leave some sort of box outside (wooden or cardboard) with pine straws, newspaper or dry leaves it in and hope that they/it will "relocate".  In the spring, you can remove all that and take precautions to keep them out of your hive next year, as you said you would do.
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Jerrymac
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« Reply #6 on: February 22, 2007, 01:35:31 PM »

I can't kill anything, so I would probably throw some sunflower seeds in a nearby area to make sure the mice/mouse have food and they don't eat anything in your hive.

We are talking about mice here. Nasty disease ridden varmints that destroy everything including human health. Feeding them will only increase their population and cause more mice trying to  infest your hives and house and vehicles and......
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« Reply #7 on: February 22, 2007, 01:46:29 PM »

A rat killem my cat Cry well...not with force but it was responsible for the death of my fearsome predator!!! i guess it was poisouned, that's why my kitty died!. thankfully the white one-the older one-the more experienced one knows not to eat these critters!!.
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« Reply #8 on: February 22, 2007, 01:58:20 PM »

Maybe the mouse your cat ate was full of poison he ate put down by someone looking to get rid of them.  Sorry about your cat. 

As far as having them in your yard and being hazardous to your health, I agree you don't want being stuck with any infestation (mouse, ants, snakes, crickets...).  I was offering a way to deal with a mouse or two, it does not sound like he has an infestation. My experience is that mice will look to anchor down when it is cold, but will move on early spring.  You can remove what attracts them anytime and have them go away.  No food, no fun. 
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« Reply #9 on: February 22, 2007, 01:59:25 PM »

You need to get it out.  As Jerry stated, a mouse will eat bees, chew the comb all up and distrupt the cluster to the point that they will get split up or away from stores and will die.   Right now the mouse is setting pretty in there with a dry place and plenty of food.  It will not leave at this point, so any attempt to trap it on the outside is useless.

I would suggest trying to get it from the bottom and not the disturb the bees if possible.   If you can lift the hive (with help if needed) off the bottom board and set it on some blocks, chances are you can scare the mouse out from the bottom.  This way you don't have to tear the hive apart and disturb the bees.  This method worked for me late last Fall before I put the reducers in.
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Jerrymac
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« Reply #10 on: February 22, 2007, 02:20:15 PM »

  If you can lift the hive (with help if needed) off the bottom board and set it on some blocks, chances are you can scare the mouse out from the bottom.  This way you don't have to tear the hive apart and disturb the bees.  This method worked for me late last Fall before I put the reducers in.

I picked up a hive body from the bottom board and sat it in the back of my pickup. Drove about a hundred yards to the house and then started taking out the frames. I had about half of them out when all of a sudden this mouse goes running out. I didn't know it was in there.

Belzabeya,

I don't know what kind of mice you got around there. I have five acres of land with probably two mice to every nine square feet. The cats stay fat around here and there is no decline in the mouse population. They will go inside of anything to get away from cold weather. They have built nest in my vehicle air cleaners from material they dug out of the insulation on the hood and firewalls. They live off of bugs, seeds, and anything that might hold some nutritional value. Probably even rabbit poop. Yep we got those critters around here also. Mice just don't go away and it is hard to starve them out. They get into your house and eat your food if they have to.
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« Reply #11 on: February 22, 2007, 02:53:59 PM »

I don't have mice I am very fortunate in that aspect. I have Norwigean Rats (huge buggers), possums, racoons, armadillos, cuban night anoles (big,ugly, and mean), black racers, glass snakes and Buffo toads. I think I am very fortunate in that aspect that most of them have not caused me any problems. The buffo toads wait at the bottom of the hive any bee that is near dead or dead and falls below is gone. The little brown lizards also try to run in the hive. They usually get stung and wait on the side or bottom of the box, lone bees have a fair chance, however lizards are fast. The birds I would catch on occasion sitting on top of the hive. Waiting for food like it was a drive through buffet. One of birds got attack by a something and now the birds wait in the tree. I have spiders that make webs along the flight path. This is the only time I can ever say I have seen fat spiders. I don't the spiders, but I mind that they don't pay any rent and build the webs so big that I can't walk into my yard with running into one.

There are live mouse traps, peanut butter is great bait. Capture live mouse drive several miles away and release in yard of the politician you like least. The politician and the mouse will become fast friends.

And if you can't post the picture message me with a url and I will have someone take a look at it.

Sincerely,
Brendhan
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Drone
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« Reply #12 on: February 22, 2007, 02:56:41 PM »


[/quote]

We are talking about mice here. Nasty disease ridden varmints that destroy everything including human health. Feeding them will only increase their population and cause more mice trying to  infest your hives and house and vehicles and......
[/quote]

And what does the general TV watching, Walmart shopping, fast food eating public have to say about bees??

Uh huh. rolleyes

I think mice are cute, but I don't want them eating my bees!

-John
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Belzabeya
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« Reply #13 on: February 22, 2007, 03:02:27 PM »

Wow, sounds like you guys have a nice properties surrounded by nature.  Actually, it sounds like a wild jungle.  I got it easy here in North Carolina.  Do we know where Rayb is from and how many mice he is dealing with? (and how big!!!!???)  I guess you are all recommending to "kick them out" no matter what or else it will potentially kill the hive.  
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thegolfpsycho
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« Reply #14 on: February 22, 2007, 03:27:57 PM »

We've had cases of Hantavirus in Utah, which is carried and transmitted through mice feces.  Not too many people that get it survive it, although that may be because only the very very ill seek medical attention.  So besides the chewing up, eating bees, urinating and stinking up the equipment, I consider them a direct hazard to my health.  Get them out of your equipment, and out of your house!  It would be a sad state of affairs to be bedridden, deathly ill, but taking comfort in the fact that at least the mouse is still alive.
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rayb
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« Reply #15 on: February 22, 2007, 04:19:46 PM »

Thanks everyone....Those rats, er mice, will go. Will let you know how easy and how I got them out.

Thanks, Ray
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« Reply #16 on: February 22, 2007, 04:28:34 PM »

I guess you are all recommending to "kick them out" no matter what or else it will potentially kill the hive. 

I've never found a "live" hive in the Spring with a mouse.  Any mouse or mouse remains have always been in dead-outs.

In fact 2 years ago I looked at a feral colony in a church that the neighbor said had been there for over 12 years (as long as they lived there) and threw multiple swarms each year.  Since it was late in the Fall  and this seemed like a prolific feral colony and I didn't want to risk removing them and getting them thru the winter.  So I decided to wait until Spring to remove them.  When I went back in the Spring, a mouse had gotten in the wall and the bees where dead.   Very disappointing.
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« Reply #17 on: February 22, 2007, 08:30:06 PM »

Kill Mickey. The girls are counting on you.
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« Reply #18 on: February 22, 2007, 11:00:01 PM »

>Any mouse or mouse remains have always been in dead-outs.

Usually the mouse moves into living hives for the heat.  They become dead-outs because of the mice.
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Jeff L
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« Reply #19 on: February 22, 2007, 11:27:48 PM »

I agree with Konasdad and Kathy. Just put in a mousetrap, bait it with peanut butter, or use D-Con. Problem solved. If you see green mouse droppings after using D-Con, it worked. Then remove the D-Con. Better to get it now before the weather warms, as they are strong breeders. You'll have many meeces if you don't. (Tom and Jerry)

Not to stick up for mice, but they are a strong food source for many critters. Owls, Raptors, Skunks, Possums, Coyotes, Egrets, Herons, heck everything. Fish too. I wouldn't eat one, but everything else does.

Jeff
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« Reply #20 on: February 22, 2007, 11:44:44 PM »

Vermin!!!!  There is no place in any place for these.  I don't care what form.  They carry disease and devastate any kind of stored foods, whether the food is for human or animal.  We live on a farm, many different forms of life and no vermin is welcome.  That includes the squirrels, (the big black ones or the cute little Douglass squirrel).   Even when these enter my yard, I sic the dogs after them.  Our dogs never even come close to catching them, but they scare the daylights out of the squirrels and they stay away for awhile.

I think that we have cats that live in the barns, they help to keep the vermin under control, I know that.

This reminds me of a story.  Yup, a story comes our way.

A few years ago, when I operated my small flower nursery, it was a hot, late spring day.  We have quite a large area behind one of my greenhouses that has been filled with road mulch, to make parking easier for the clients.  Alongside the periphery of the gravelled area, I saw a dead rat.  It must have dehydrated in the hot sun, and being in a rather obsure place, had flattened down to very thin.

I was looking at this flattened, rather large rat, and it moved.  Impossible.  It was dead and flat.  Of course, me with my curious nature, picked up a stick and touched the resurrected vermin.  It felt as dead and flat as it looked.  I flipped it over.  EEEKS!!!  On the underside of this flattened, disgusting hunk of junk were 3 or 4 rather large orange and black coloured bugs.  These insects didn't even move when I lifted the rat.  I was disgusted and got a bag to put this rat into and disposed of it.  I presume the bugs ran home.

To this day I do not really know what was going on with these obviously very strong bugs.  I suspect that they were going to piggyback this wonderful meal to their home, wherever their home may have been and feed their family.  They obviously were in this catch of food together, a family event.

That was the only time I have ever seen this species of insect.  I wish that in those days I would have had my digital camera, I would have taken a picture with great pleasure, to examine the insect further and with any luck, identified it.  Oooh, the bugs, gotta love them.  Best of days.  Cindi
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Jerrymac
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« Reply #21 on: February 23, 2007, 11:03:00 AM »

Here is something about some rodents;

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070223/ap_on_re_us/restaurant_rats;_ylt=AmBG.Tky.qN4MgCvNhyS45Ws0NUE
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« Reply #22 on: February 23, 2007, 11:21:05 AM »

Hey Cindi,

My prairie dogs feelings were hurt by your rant.


I am talking to them now but this may take a while.
Now don't you feel guilty for grouping my cute lovable praire dogs with you idea of vermin infested rodents? I have 12 prairie dogs.
My african pygmy hedgehog was not offended.


 grin
God I love being sarcastic.
Hey Cindi, have great day.

Sincerely,
Brendhan
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Jerrymac
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« Reply #23 on: February 23, 2007, 11:27:54 AM »

We have a lot of those prairie dogs out here. Probably millions.
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« Reply #24 on: February 23, 2007, 11:40:15 AM »

Jerrymac
PDs are not indeginous to Florida. Mine are rescues. I am on an exotic wildlife rescue list with Busch wildlife sanctuary. People use to be able to buy them as pets and then ended up not being able to care for them. So my wife and I take them in.
http://www.understudy.net/pdcage.html

I need to update the photos.

Sincerely,
Brendhan
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« Reply #25 on: February 23, 2007, 04:09:11 PM »

I knew they weren't indigenous to Florida. But you know what you said about that frog? Let a few of those dogs loose and you will have a bunch of the furry cute critters...... everywhere.
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« Reply #26 on: February 23, 2007, 05:18:30 PM »

I knew they weren't indigenous to Florida. But you know what you said about that frog? Let a few of those dogs loose and you will have a bunch of the furry cute critters...... everywhere.
Breeding PDs in captivity is very difficult. In my 10 plus years with them I have had no litters.

Sincerely,
Brendhan
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« Reply #27 on: February 23, 2007, 06:39:49 PM »

She must one powerfully ugly prarie dog. Try getting him drunk.
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« Reply #28 on: February 23, 2007, 07:33:05 PM »

Breeding PDs in captivity is very difficult. In my 10 plus years with them I have had no litters.

Turn them loose in your back yard. Or come over here and catch a few more. Perhaps they need competition. Some animals will breed only to the space they have. Not sure if PDs are one of those animals.
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« Reply #29 on: February 23, 2007, 07:43:58 PM »

Breeding PDs in captivity is very difficult. In my 10 plus years with them I have had no litters.

Turn them loose in your back yard. Or come over here and catch a few more. Perhaps they need competition. Some animals will breed only to the space they have. Not sure if PDs are one of those animals.

No, turning them loose in the backyard would be the same as importing bufo toads.
PDs require large areas to meet breeding needs. Next year they will get a bigger cage and we will see what happens then.

I would love to come and rescue a few but if they aren't on someone's property I leave them alone. They are a protected species now. Due to population decline. You may see lots of them but they use to range all the way up to colarado. There use to be millions of them. Not any more. I would love to have them breed so we could be part of the reintroduction to the wild program. So many other species are dependant on them as food. With the decline of PD populations other animals have been hurt by it also.

It's kinda like the cut outs I do for bees. I don't want to kill the bees I want to move them to some place that wants them. And I want them to flourish.

Sincerely,
Brendhan
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« Reply #30 on: February 24, 2007, 12:51:16 AM »

I think we drifted off topic.... BUT....

I was wondering if the PD could/would reproduce if they can't get way down in the ground like they do in the wild.

Yeah I had heard they were a protected species, and people around here wonder why. As a child the only prairie dogs I knew of in Lubbock were in a prairie dog town. A walled in community of dogs at a park. And some dogs out on a friend of my grandfathers farm. We would go out there and delete a few for the guy every chance we got. Bang Bang.

But now they are all over the place. The city has this place where they spray waste water (treated sewer water) for the plant life to take out some of the nitrogen. The PDs got so bad out there the city council started fearing the water was getting too deep into the ground and polluting the water table. So an expert trapper was called out to get rid of the critters. Anyone with the proper license or permits could go there and capture as many as they wanted to for relocation up to a certain date, then the terminator was to come finish them off.... humanly of course.

But I am sure we have a few million just in the city limits of Lubbock.   
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« Reply #31 on: February 24, 2007, 08:23:53 AM »

I think we drifted off topic.... BUT....

I was wondering if the PD could/would reproduce if they can't get way down in the ground like they do in the wild.

That may be part of the issue. That is why I designing a new cage for next year. Also for me part of the issue now is the age of my PDs some of which are 10 years old. That is almost a record for PDs.

Quote
Yeah I had heard they were a protected species, and people around here wonder why. As a child the only prairie dogs I knew of in Lubbock were in a prairie dog town. A walled in community of dogs at a park. And some dogs out on a friend of my grandfathers farm. We would go out there and delete a few for the guy every chance we got. Bang Bang.
They are protected because as many as you see is less than .01% of what the population use to be.

Quote
But now they are all over the place. The city has this place where they spray waste water (treated sewer water) for the plant life to take out some of the nitrogen. The PDs got so bad out there the city council started fearing the water was getting too deep into the ground and polluting the water table. So an expert trapper was called out to get rid of the critters. Anyone with the proper license or permits could go there and capture as many as they wanted to for relocation up to a certain date, then the terminator was to come finish them off.... humanly of course.

But I am sure we have a few million just in the city limits of Lubbock.   

This is what happens when humans develop and expand. We just force out whatever is there. It is a bummer that the waste water and the PDs are in conflict.
I would like to know the results of the well tests.

I know you get to see the PDs almost everyday in the wild where you live. For as long as I have been raising them and as much as I travel. My wife and I have only seen them once in the wild. In a perserve in Sayre, OK. That is because most of their habitat has been developed over.

It would be cool if they could take some of your population and relocate them. I don't know how realistic that is either.

Sincerely,
Brendhan
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« Reply #32 on: February 25, 2007, 12:09:53 AM »

Jerrymac
http://www.weloveprairiedogs.com/relocation.html

Two members of the PD list are working in Lubbock.

Sincerely,
Brendhan
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« Reply #33 on: February 25, 2007, 01:02:55 AM »

Brendhan.  Gotta laugh at you.  I just hope that your prairie dogs can understand your lingo!!!

My hat off to you for animal rescue, that is a wonderful thing to do and I totally admire people that are rescuers, be it human, animal, insect, any kind of rescue work.  A good thing, you will have a good life.  People get what they give.  I firmly believe in that.

But, I really don't care how cute you think your prairie dogs are.  My opinioin sticks.  I don't like rodents, of any sort.  I actually don't even like cats, now that may rustle some feathers for sure.

Dogs, horses, barnyard animals, those are my bag, love all of these.

So Brendhan, carry on with the sarcasim, I can take it!!!  LOL.  Best of great days.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #34 on: February 25, 2007, 05:24:29 AM »

AHH! what is not to like about cats?  Cindi, come on now...I seem to always inherit cats wherever I move.  I have had two tomcats that were my favorite companions.  When we moved out here the old lady left her cat for us.  SHE named him cat, we got harassed by the vets every time about that but he was the prototype so...he loved to bring gifts home with him and show off which stef was not too keen on...but he was awesome.   Last year we were out hiking (cat and I), and came across a bear.  I learned to breath again after a few moments while walking backwards, and cat CHARGED after the bear!  When he finally came home he was so puffed up I had to laugh.  I understand why agricultural societies like the ancient egyptians mummified cats and built temples in their honor.  They are quite seriously the best pets.  I think most people hate cats because they have known the pampered domesticated cats.  All the best cats I have known were allowed outside whenever they wanted to hunt, and curled up by the fire when they were done.
As a disclaimer I will add that I do believe crazy cat lady sickness is a real and horrible disease affecting millions of unbalanced women around the world.  Again, not the cats fault. 
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« Reply #35 on: February 25, 2007, 09:15:39 AM »

Steve, I am very impressed with how you hang your clothes (LOL).  Where would like be without a clothesline?  Nothing nicer than the sheets that air in the freshness of the breeze.

Anyways, OK, I take back what I said about the cats.  I have only known domesticated, indoorsy type cats.  They always seem so arrogant that I just had no use for them.  Never had cats personally, especially an outdoor, barn type cat.  Maybe they are different.  One should not judge that book by its cover.

I think that the reason why I have not had any cats is because of the dogs I have had over the years.  I know dogs and cats get along, sometimes, but I just never bothered to get one to see if they would with mine.  We have for the most of our married lives lived on farming lands, but not had cats.  Best of the best day.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #36 on: February 25, 2007, 09:28:03 AM »

Anyways, OK, I take back what I said about the cats.  I have only known domesticated, indoorsy type cats.  They always seem so arrogant that I just had no use for them.  Never had cats personally, especially an outdoor, barn type cat.  Maybe they are different.  One should not judge that book by its cover.

Cats are arrogant, they have a right to be. They know they are better than the rest.
 grin

It is very funny how the power structure takes place in my house. The dog is the lowest on the hierarchy. Despite the fact that he is the biggest. He receives more abuse and bullying from the cats than should be allowed. He walks by a cat and they just take a pop shot at him, no reason other than to be mean. However the PDs rule the roost. Make no bones about it. The PDs take crap from none. The cats use to come up in like a hunt position to the PDs and the PDs would turn around and stare the cat down.

The cat once made a pop shot at a PD and the PD turned around and barked at the cat. Then came back with 3 more and they attacked the cat. A PD with a mouthful of cat fur and standing proud was one of the funniest things I have ever seen. The cats give the PDs their space. The dog also respects the PDs they once bit him on the paw after he licked one.

The only time I have seen the PDs really scared was when I took them to the ren fest and we went by the raptor show. The PDs saw those bird and barked alarms and hid in the backpack and didn't come out for over an hour.


Sincerely,
Brendhan
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« Reply #37 on: February 25, 2007, 09:58:38 AM »

Brendhan.  Now that little story about the PDs is funny!!!  They surely have the power.  I didn't realize that they barked.

My daughter had ferrats at one point in time.  I guess they are a rodent too.  So I have to take that back about the hatred of rodents.  Man I am taking alot back this morning.  Sometimes I just  speak too freely without thinking I guess.

Now these ferrats were a blast.  So darn cute and man do they have a playful attitude.  Our dogs did not like them one little bit and were terribly frightened when the ferrats came over to "play."  Funny thing.  When my daughter gave her ferrats to a friend, she found all kinds of things that they had taken and hidden all over her house, in the strangest places. 

I love the scent of the ferrat, they were de-stinked (lol), but they still had a very strong aroma.  The scent of these critters reminded me of honey.  It seems many things remind me of that smell.

When I was a youngster we had a spotted skunk, it was a rodent too I guess.  It was a tiny little thing, not the big civic cats that really can be big here.  (I still can't get over how the skunk cabbage that grows in our ravine really does smell like skunk spray).  this spotted skunk smell kind of like honey too.  Yikes!!!!  Now that sounds too wierd, honey scents.  Corn pollen, ferrats, skunks.  Maybe my sense of scent has gone off to the dark side, lol.  Best of best days.  Cindi

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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #38 on: February 25, 2007, 10:17:09 AM »

Brendhan.  Now that little story about the PDs is funny!!!  They surely have the power.  I didn't realize that they barked.

My daughter had ferrats at one point in time.  I guess they are a rodent too.  So I have to take that back about the hatred of rodents.  Man I am taking alot back this morning.  Sometimes I just  speak too freely without thinking I guess.
No, ferrets are weasels. Black footed ferrets eat PDs.

Quote
Now these ferrats were a blast.  So darn cute and man do they have a playful attitude.  Our dogs did not like them one little bit and were terribly frightened when the ferrats came over to "play."  Funny thing.  When my daughter gave her ferrats to a friend, she found all kinds of things that they had taken and hidden all over her house, in the strangest places. 
I had a roomate many years ago who had two. Little thieves would take any shiney object they could.

Quote
I love the scent of the ferrat, they were de-stinked (lol), but they still had a very strong aroma.  The scent of these critters reminded me of honey.  It seems many things remind me of that smell.
They still smell but not as bad. If you bath them and keep the litter box clean there isn't really any smell unless you bury your nose in their fur.

Quote
When I was a youngster we had a spotted skunk, it was a rodent too I guess.  It was a tiny little thing, not the big civic cats that really can be big here.  (I still can't get over how the skunk cabbage that grows in our ravine really does smell like skunk spray).  this spotted skunk smell kind of like honey too.  Yikes!!!!  Now that sounds too wierd, honey scents.  Corn pollen, ferrats, skunks.  Maybe my sense of scent has gone off to the dark side, lol.  Best of best days.  Cindi
Skunks are mamals.
And they are awesome. I love it when they are mad and stomp their front feet as a warning.

Okay today's lesson plan for Cindi is to write 100 times:
Just because it is small and furry doesn't mean it is a rodent.

No copy/paste Smiley


Sincerely,
Brendhan
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« Reply #39 on: February 25, 2007, 10:30:38 AM »

Brendhan, you are so mean.  I am off to write my lines.  Haven't done that since grade school, but I have to practice my penmanship skills.  They are somewhat lacking since I hardly ever sit with pen in hand anymore. 

I have learned some valuable lessons from my teacher (LOL), Brendhan, appreciate the enlightenment.

I was feeding the birds yesterday underneath the hazelnut tree and heard kind of a scratching sound.  I looked into the tree and there was a Douglas squirrel sitting there looking at me.  They are brazen miracles of nature.  He did not flinch and inch and I just ignored him.  The seed that I set out and sprinkle on the ground is very small, but I also have a bag of black oil seed sunflower that I mix in with it.  That was what the squirrel was after.  So be it.  He must have been hungry and I cannot turn away any hungry mouths.  So he had his time and off he went.

When we gathered walnuts from my other sister who lives about an hours drive away, there were many nuts that were not quite good enough for drying and storage.  So I would throw them by the wayside after we were done cleaning them.  The squirrels must have had a wonderful time, because the next day, ALL of those disgarded were no where to be seen.  They did a nice job of clean up.  Best day.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #40 on: February 25, 2007, 10:40:02 AM »

OK since we are gonna talk about animals. We have a cat that adopted us. It was running free, catching mice, rabbits, and gofers. Because it was keeping the mice away from the house and did that darn gofer in, we decided we would keep it around. We started feeding it. Then we were ending up feeding about ten more cats. So we would let the cat in.... Named it Jo Momma Huh? Someone did.... so we weren't feeding all the freeloaders.

We have two Chihuahuas. Some times one of the dogs, Lokie, starts after the Jo. And then Killer, the other dog, will jump in on the chase. I try to tell these stupid mutts that the cat has killed critters bigger than they are....this is a big cat.... but they don't listen.

So now the cat has become a house cat. Fat and lazy. Won't hardly go out.... well some one has turned a large German Shepherd loose out here...... Sort of the neighborhood dog.... and he don't like cats. Now we got another gofer out in the yard messing up everything. Danged ol' cat won't go out to get it.
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« Reply #41 on: February 25, 2007, 11:01:29 AM »

Jerry, oh brother!!!  Your poor ol' cat.  I bet it is terrified of that big dog in the neighbourhood.  Can't blame it for not wanting to go outside.

I know that cats can command the dogs.  I've seen the cat at my daughter's house attack her dog when it came even close to the garage where she had her litter.  She was downright the cat from hell!!!  And the dog knew it.  I am talking about a big dog being put on the run by this tiny little cat.  She got him once on the side that I saw and drew a substantial amount of blood.  Cat scratch fever!!!  LOL.  The poor dog figured it out I am sure.  Best of the best day.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #42 on: February 25, 2007, 11:09:44 AM »

My mom had a Siamese cat. One day this guy drove up in a pickup with a German Shepherd in the back. The dog jumped out and the cat went straight for that dog. The dog jumped back into the pickup and the cat marched around the truck to make sure he stayed there.
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rainbow sunflower  Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak.   rainbow sunflower

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