9 Frame Honey Supers

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AllanJ:
Hi,

I read somewhere (sorry, forgot where) that reducing a 10 frame honey super to 9 frames can result in the comb being built out more and making it easier to harvest.  Any truth in this?  I notice that some companies sell 9 frame metal guides to be used in 10 frame bodies for this purpose. 

Thanks.
AJ.

Mici:
i didn't read this topic very carefully since i don't keep in LR but if i'm correct, they say you have to put 10 frames for bees to build, once they are built you can take one out, since honey comb is wider/thicker than brood/pollen comb. easyer to manipulate?
anyway read that topic

Stingtarget:
The first super I put on my hives was the traditional 10 frame.  After talking to another beekeeper I opted to try a medium set up with 9 frames.  At extracting time the 9 frame setup was obviously easier to cut the wax cappings off for extracting.  Each hive produced 3.5 gallons of honey from 1 shallow 10 frame super and 1 medium 9 frame super.  If switching to the 9 frame setup I'd recommed the medium super so that you don't lose honey by losing the 1 frame.

I am now using the 10 frame shallows for winter stores only.  ALL extracted surplus honey comes from 9 frame mediums.

imabkpr:
Quote from: AllanJ on February 17, 2007, 12:24:49 PM

Hi,

I read somewhere (sorry, forgot where) that reducing a 10 frame honey super to 9 frames can result in the comb being built out more and making it easier to harvest.  Any truth in this?  I notice that some companies sell 9 frame metal guides to be used in 10 frame bodies for this purpose. 

Thanks.
AJ.

 Yes, using 9 frames of comb in a 10 frame hive will let the comb be finished drawn out farther making it easier to uncap. You may even want to use only 8 frames in a 10 frame box if you want the extra wax.  But when starting with foundation use 10 frames in a 10 frame box, after it is drawn you can remove 1 frame if you want go with 9 frames.  In my deep brood chamber and all my honey supers i use 9 frames in a 10 frame box. I wouldn't waste my time getting the frame spacers you are talking about because you can't put 10 frames of foundation in boxes that have these spacers in them. Which means you would have boxes for drawing foundation and also different boxes for brood and honey.
                                                                                              Charlie

Michael Bush:
>I read somewhere (sorry, forgot where) that reducing a 10 frame honey super to 9 frames can result in the comb being built out more and making it easier to harvest.  Any truth in this?

Typically most beekeepers use ten frames of foundation in the supers because the bees are less likely to mess up drawing the comb.  Some use nine, but, in my experience sometimes the bees will build combs between when you do that.  Then after harvesting and you have drawn comb, Most beekeepers use nine drawn comb in a ten frame box.  This make thicker comb that is much easier to uncap AND it takes less frames.  Some people even put eight drawn comb in a ten frame super.

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