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Author Topic: Starting Over Advice Needed  (Read 4653 times)
TwT
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Galactic Bee
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« Reply #40 on: January 30, 2007, 09:36:48 PM »

OH i understood his post but the shock I had reading something I wrote that made since to someone else..... Wink me being a rookie I actually have learned something about bee's...... Wink to give advice!!!!   tongue and yes im on medication  evil         just think one day I might be a beekeeper!!!!!!!!
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the kid
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« Reply #41 on: January 30, 2007, 11:47:18 PM »

Im with MB on this one .To my thinking if it is posion to kill mites it cant bee doing the girls alot of good eather ,,,, and if you worry about it getting in the honey .. Ill read his sites and try it .  If it helps alittle every little bit helps .   talked to TFBM last week and he used no poision for a lot of years so it must work .  it may cost about the same but I dont like my honey with a shot of poision

Now my penny is spent for the week
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #42 on: February 03, 2007, 08:42:17 PM »

>if "organic" beekeeping were effective, the commercial beekeepers would be all over it.

Not necessarily, the commercial beekeeper is interested in the end result. Keeping his hives alive for honey and pollenation income is the major focus.  A die off of a large portion of his stock to allow them to become reistant is economical suicide from their point of view.

When Varroa resistant stocks become abundant, then you will see the commercial beekeeper follow suit, but not until then.  He doesn't have the time or the money to dedicate to the development of resistance stocks because in order to survive economically he must get as much pollenation fees and the highest honey harvest to keep his business operating.

The development of resistant stock is going to have to be done by the hobbiest because they are the only ones who have the time and patience to sort and continually rebuild their stocks in a effort to develop resistance bees.  It took a few years before the tracheal mite became a non-issue as the bees built up resistance.  It will take longer with the Varroa mite because of its size and reproduction method.
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bmad12
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« Reply #43 on: February 04, 2007, 04:59:28 PM »

I know I'm probably just asking another stupid question, but what makes the bees resistant to the mites.  Do they live with them, or do they kill them on their own?  How does it work?  I don't yet have a hive, and it will probably be another year before I do, but I'd like to know as much as I can before starting out.


Thanks
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« Reply #44 on: February 04, 2007, 06:05:23 PM »

>I know I'm probably just asking another stupid question, but what makes the bees resistant to the mites.

The scientists would like to know the answer to that question.  So far there seem to be a variety of traits that help.  The Russians seem to have the ability to tolerate a heavy mite load and live.  The Hygenic (and SMR are extra hygenic) seem to be better at discerning infested cells and chewing them out before they can reproduce (at the purple eyed pupae stage).  Grooming behavior may help.  Biting mites may help.  The bees raised on small cell seem to have the hygenic traits plus biting mites and grooming more.  I don't know why.  But mostly on natural sized cells the Bees have a shorter cycle which gives the mites a shorter cycle to reproduce in which makes a huge difference.

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesnaturalcell.htm

But all in all if they are feral bees surviving on natural cell already it's a pretty good bet they have the genetics to survive.  Personally, I have not seen large cell bees survive more than two years without treatment.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #45 on: February 04, 2007, 09:28:43 PM »

How common are mites?  Is it pretty much a guarentee that your hive will encounter these pests?  or is it a location thing?  Do they affect other thing, other than the bees?  Honey, wax, etc?  And, how do the mites make it into the hive, where do they come from?  Do they hitch a ride on the bees or crawl in? 

I live in Florida, in the Tampa Bay area, North Port to be exact.  We are planning to move back to North Carolina at the end of this year.  We'll be living in the north east corner of NC, in Moyock, 5 minutes from the Virgina line.  I know this is off the subject, but I'm really itching to get into beekeeping.  And the more I read here the more I don't want to wait.  My plan was to wait the year out and get into it sometime next year after we move.  I guess what I'm getting at  is, would it be possible to get into it while I'm here, and then possibly move the hive with us when we move.  I have nothing now, so I guess something else to look at would be, if I was able to go ahead and start, would there be time for me get ALL (and I do mean all) my equipment together?  And of coarse, is there anyone, or a group/club in my area to help me out?  Thanks for putting up with all my questions.

Ben
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #46 on: February 05, 2007, 06:01:14 PM »

Moving hives is not a difficult thing.  Commercial beekeepers often move their hives from Minnesota to California and back again in the same year.  Some make even longer moves.  Personally I've moved my hives numerous times as I've changed residences.
As long as the entrances are closed with a porous object (folded window screen) and the boxes are well secured they can be moved with ease.
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« Reply #47 on: February 05, 2007, 06:14:51 PM »

We're all here to help and ask advice if needed. I've learned a lot here and hope to learn a lot more.
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« Reply #48 on: February 05, 2007, 07:19:36 PM »

>How common are mites?

Endemic.

> Is it pretty much a guarentee that your hive will encounter these pests?

Yes!

>  or is it a location thing?

No.

>  Do they affect other thing, other than the bees?

Bumble bees.

> Honey, wax, etc?

No.

>  And, how do the mites make it into the hive, where do they come from?  Do they hitch a ride on the bees

Yes.

> or crawl in?

No.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
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