Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
September 18, 2014, 03:22:02 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: ATTENTION ALL NEW MEMBERS
PLEASE READ THIS OR YOUR ACCOUNT MAY BE DELETED - CLICK HERE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat(1)  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Wierd Quest. About Foxes  (Read 1896 times)
KONASDAD
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2011


Location: Cherry Hill, N.J.


« on: January 25, 2007, 09:37:38 AM »

I live in area where foxes are very uncommon. Nonetheless i have one living in my area and hunting in my yard. I have seen him twice. He is a very large red fox and looks great. Looks healthy, which foxes rarely do around my immediate area. I have found five of his kills. Rabbits. My question is he always leaves the entrails and some fur in a big bloody pile. Why doesn't he eat the entrails? Of course these items are now a play thing for my lab which has its own amusement factor!!! Lastly, do foxes succesfully hunt groundhogs. I have a groundhog family I would love to be hunted out of existance! Can I encourage the fox to hunt the groundhog?
Logged

"The more complex the Mind, the Greater the need for the simplicity of Play".
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #1 on: January 25, 2007, 09:56:35 AM »

Oooh, now that is interesting, I can't wait to hear some responses from people.  I know that the coyotes prefer the entrails around here.  Strange eh?  Great day.  Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Scadsobees
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3198


Location: Jenison, MI

Best use of smileys in a post award.


« Reply #2 on: January 25, 2007, 01:29:13 PM »

Uh, aren't groundhogs as big or bigger than foxes??

As a boy I remember 2 dogs taking almost an hour to take down one groundhog (but they weren't trained killers...well the one was the neighbors and knew how to kill our chickens...)
Logged

Rick
KONASDAD
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2011


Location: Cherry Hill, N.J.


« Reply #3 on: January 25, 2007, 01:56:08 PM »

This is one big red fox, but I know they are mostly fur. The groundhogs are big too. My neighbors Borzois(russian wolfhounds) kill about three per year. They cant get to my yard b/c of a fence though. I've tried havaheart type traps and even gtot one w/ bow and arrow. I could never use a gun in my area. They are killing very old trees in my yard by burrowing under the roots and they die b/c the roots are suspended.
I thought a fox would eat the entrails too b/c its ful of fats and proteins. Any way, just thinking out loud is all.......
I hate these groundhogs!!!!
Logged

"The more complex the Mind, the Greater the need for the simplicity of Play".
Brian D. Bray
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 7369


Location: Anacortes, WA 98221

I really look like this, just ask Cindi.


WWW
« Reply #4 on: January 25, 2007, 09:09:13 PM »

Where I live we sometimes run over Foxes in the city streets.  They are as bad as coyotes.
Logged

Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #5 on: January 26, 2007, 12:40:53 AM »

We have no foxes here, but coyotes galore, I hear them almost every night and they sound very scarey, I do not like their scarey sound, nor do my dogs.  They wake me out of my deal sleep. C.
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Jerrymac
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6047


Location: Wolfforth Texas


« Reply #6 on: January 26, 2007, 01:10:34 AM »

I love sitting out at night listening to the coyotes.
About them ground hogs. I won't tell you what this lady didn't tell me about gophers. Stick a hose in the tail pipe and into the burrow. Remember you didn't hear that from me.
Logged

rainbow sunflower  Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak.   rainbow sunflower

 Jerry

My pictures.Type in password;  youview
     http://photobucket.com/albums/v225/Jerry-mac/
Understudy
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 4640


Location: West Palm Beach, Fl


WWW
« Reply #7 on: January 26, 2007, 04:58:01 PM »

I am very jealous. You have a fox and groundhogs. I am not sure why it leaves the entrails and fur pile. The groundhogs will probably not be food for the fox. They will fight back.

If it is a female fox that stays healthy you may end up with little foxes next year. How cool would that be.

Sincerely,
Brendhan
Logged

The status is not quo. The world is a mess and I just need to rule it. Dr. Horrible
mick
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1450


Location: s/e melbourne australia (-)37.50S 145.0E


« Reply #8 on: January 26, 2007, 06:37:17 PM »

That is unusual, foxes usually go for the entrails first. I would imagine that he has so much food availabel that he is just eating the meaty bits. have a look at his scat if you can, its amazing how many seeds and insects foxes eat.
Logged
Kev
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 244


Location: Hoosick Falls, NY


« Reply #9 on: January 26, 2007, 07:49:22 PM »

We have foxes and groundhogs (+bear, coyote, bobcat, and tourists) around here too. I think a full-grown groundhog would easily outweigh a fox and be too dangerous to go after when there's easier prey like rabbits and voles to get.

I once came across a fox den in a blackberry patch. Those fox must have been pretty regular from eating all those berries.

A shotgun is the quick fix around here, but probably not in Cherry Hill. Maybe the local police would be willing to do some target shooting one saturday.

Kev
Logged

One could do worse than be a swinger of birches.
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13657


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #10 on: January 26, 2007, 09:32:32 PM »

>Why doesn't he eat the entrails?

Because he has meat?
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #11 on: January 26, 2007, 11:08:32 PM »

I actually cannot believe how big the groundhogs sound.  I always thought they were small critters kind of like a mole or something.  Guess I am rather uninformed, time to change that.  Great day.  Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
KONASDAD
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2011


Location: Cherry Hill, N.J.


« Reply #12 on: January 27, 2007, 09:32:37 AM »

I have looked at scat. Loaded w/ mice remains, seeds and the like. Might have to agree w/ MB, he must have better sources of protein than the innards. These innards are frozen at the moment and I looked real closely. Mostly just the stomach and intestines. No heart, liver or lungs. The choice pieces have been eaten, low value innards left to rot.
Logged

"The more complex the Mind, the Greater the need for the simplicity of Play".
wayne
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 344

Location: Indiana


« Reply #13 on: January 27, 2007, 08:25:22 PM »

   What you are finding doesn't sound like a Fox kill. It sounds more like a raptor kill like an Owl. Fox eat hide and all and birds pluck off the hide and eat the meat. The remains tend to fall below the roost in a pile.
  The woodchuck is probably safe. A Fox may take a small animal but the adult woodchuck has few enemies in a suburban setting.
  If the chuck is active now it can be evicted, or trapped easily.


 
Logged

I was born about 100 years too early, or to late.
KONASDAD
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2011


Location: Cherry Hill, N.J.


« Reply #14 on: January 28, 2007, 10:32:34 AM »

Not a raptor. I recognize those kills. I find them often. Most of the hawks in my area are small, and rabbits are way to big to kill. Positive its the fox. Fox also leaves scat right next to kill. As for the fur, its just lots of tuffs of hair, no skin attached. There are so few predators in my area its w/o competition. Very few owls in my area as well. Few trees that are old and few farms in area either.
Logged

"The more complex the Mind, the Greater the need for the simplicity of Play".
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.166 seconds with 21 queries.

Google visited last this page September 13, 2014, 06:51:04 PM
anything