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Author Topic: Jargon -- headbutting and pulling hair  (Read 1181 times)
Cindi
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« on: February 03, 2007, 02:29:54 PM »

OK, I've gotta ask. I have heard this "headbutting" term now several times recently and am more than curious what on earth is being talked about.  The "hair pulling" also got me wondering.

Do you guys know something that I don't know (LOL).  I can only guess what these two terms mean, but how about some good definition and experiences, would love to hear about it. 

If it is about the bees butting the human head, I have not experienced that and would wonder what it is all about.  Curious and kniave.  Great day.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Michael Bush
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« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2007, 03:15:12 PM »

They are exactly what they sound like.  Headbutting is when they butt into your head with their head as a warning.  If you get a hot hive that is doing this it's like hail against the veil (if you were wise enough to be wearing one).

Hair pulling is when they latch onto a hair and pull.  This often leads to them getting tangled in my beard or the hair on my head and then, when they get frustrated from being tangled, they sting.  But they will sometimes grab the hair on your arm and pull too.  They do the same to each other, which is why robber bees are usually dark and shiny.  They have had their hair pulled out.

Both are warnings that are short of stinging.  The bees are hoping to get you to leave without mounting a sting attack.
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Michael Bush
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Cindi
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« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2007, 10:31:44 PM »

Michael, right, now I guess that I am lucky that I haven't annoyed the bees I guess.  I spend many, many, many hours outside during the beekeeping season working around the apiary, especially just sitting and watching.  This is a wonderful passtime for me and I never get bored.  I am kind of glad that I haven't had them pull my hair nor headbutt me, but I suppose it will happen one day sooner or later.

It would be an interesting experience that I would probably know once it happened to me for sure.  HOpefully, I will never bug them enough that they bug me.  Great day.  Cindi

I think that they like the sweeet smell of baby powder on my hands and probably do not take any offence when I work the hives with that fragrance prevailing.  Maybe I am just lucky, rarely have I ever been stung, only if it has been my fault, for instance, if I put my arm on one or wrist or finger or whatever.  I have sustained a few good stings with a swarm capture one time.  That is about it.  Other than that, maybe 5 stings in the two seasons I have kept bees.  Luck or what?  Who knows.  Great day.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
BEE C
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« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2007, 04:18:02 AM »

I have been headbutted many times, but pulling hair?  Thats hilarious! I don't doubt it happens I just have never had them tug on my goatee to get rid of me.
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Trot
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« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2007, 04:52:59 PM »

Bee C,

you better believe it. They never pull any on my goatee, or my head for that matter. But when my wife comes snooping around the hives, they get busy right away.

Regards
Trot
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BEE C
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« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2007, 07:06:19 PM »

Ok I stopped laughing now... grin I really enjoyed telling my fiance about these beehaviors.  She thought I was pulling her leg (no pun intended), because I usually am, until I showed her that others have that happen to them.  I can see bees pulling hair, I do believe it, and the look on my fiances face was priceless.  They are such facinating creatures.
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Geoff
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« Reply #6 on: February 04, 2007, 07:20:29 PM »

Hi Cindi
          I have only encountered it with a veil on and it can be just like a hail storm or somebody pelting you with rice. There is generally a lone raider who persists till they get tired of " head butting".
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Cindi
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« Reply #7 on: February 04, 2007, 07:56:57 PM »

Trot, it seems to me in the cobwebs of my mind that I recall you mentioning one time that your wife was not overly, overly fond of being around the bees.  If my memory serves me, I don't blame her one little bit.

I remember last summer a bee pal of mine whose 2 colonies he kept at my place came over.  This is a fellow that sometimes comes over after working really hard in the sun building.  I told him that I heard that bees didn't particularly like the smell of the sweaty human body.  Now he can be rather smelly after that hard day working.

We were standing quite a distance from the hives, perhaps 20 feet, just talking.  Sure enough, I could smell is sweat, and wouldn't you know it, a bee actually flew at him and started flying around his head.  Of course, him being a very new person to the bee world (well, sometimes I guess that does not matter one hoot), he started flailing his hands at the bee.  Well, I know that this antagonized the bee and he started to run, sure enough, the bee flew faster.  He must of outrun the bee or something because in a couple of minutes he turned around at me and smiled.

I smiled back.  I told him he probably just simply smelled.  I know this guy well enough that he did not take offence.  But the funniest thing was, the next time he came over he was clean shave, washed hair and looked and smelled pretty good.  Lessons learned?Huh  Great day.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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