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Author Topic: New queen Every Year = less swarm?  (Read 8089 times)
Finsky
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« Reply #20 on: February 09, 2007, 06:48:42 AM »

hey finsky. i just found out at least one thing remains to be "invented", and that is making suitable habitation for small arachnets to live in the hive.


Russian beekeepers are masters to find new ideas! Almost macig ways.

Truly, there are many new inventions. One is the worker queen, which was revield 15 years ago. There are no "workerr queen", they are hundreds. However beekeepers tell same "shake far away hive" so worker queen will remain in busches. Idea to research come from wasp behaviour. http://www.lasi.group.shef.ac.uk/aps323/ConflictInBeeHive.pdf

One interesting question is the laying gap in the middle of best yild period. Old idea is that hive has more resources to forage and handla honey.  Some summers ago I begun to suspect it that really true because some of my hives went really upset when I took queen away and they stopped foraging, and the hives with queen were best foragers.

I found some reseaches which told that the desire how bees forage, depends on the quality of queen, is it mated, unmated, in cell and so on.  No I have gived up killing queens at the beginning of yield season.


This is one old question which natural beekeeprs do not accept: how much combs' drawing need honey.
http://www.honeybeeworld.com/diary/articles/fdnvsdrawn.htm


What I mean is: Beekeeprs are very faithful to their old knowledge. Even if I give a link to new information, people do not read it. They just keep their 50-100 years old information in their heads.

When I started to update my knowledge from internet, I was surprise how bad was my knowledge. But I have seen that others had even worse knowledge.  cool

Methods to handle mites have changed quite often. It takes about 5-7 years and new methods have found.

.



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Finsky
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« Reply #21 on: February 09, 2007, 06:51:32 AM »


Psuedo scorpions maybe?

No, they are not. They are yellowish and white mites which eat pollen and smaller animals on bottom.  They are abundant in soil. Do they really help bees or not, they are just talking.
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Mici
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« Reply #22 on: February 09, 2007, 12:53:09 PM »

i think mr. bush is right pseudoscorpios

anyway, mr. Bushes trnaslations sounds right
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Finsky
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« Reply #23 on: February 09, 2007, 02:35:25 PM »

i think mr. bush is right pseudoscorpios

anyway, mr. Bushes trnaslations sounds right


I know that he is not. They are not pseudoscorpions.

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Michael Bush
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« Reply #24 on: February 09, 2007, 06:39:35 PM »

I'm not saying that what is being refered to is or is not psuedo scorpions.

Try a search on Google for:
pseudoscorpions beekeeping

You'll get several hundred hits.
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Michael Bush
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Mici
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« Reply #25 on: February 09, 2007, 06:50:17 PM »

sorry finsky but i think mr. bush is right about them, check for google hits. also i checked both our word as well as pseudoscorpions, both refer to "fake" "not real" scorpios. 100% they are!
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Finsky
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« Reply #26 on: February 10, 2007, 02:05:00 AM »

sorry finsky but i think mr. bush is right about them, check for google hits. also i checked both our word as well as pseudoscorpions, both refer to "fake" "not real" scorpios. 100% they are!


I have seen those bugs on bottom and they are not pseudoscorpions in my hives. Of course, in Michaels hives they parhaps are. But Mic, you live in Slovenia and you see up to USA what Mickhaels bugs are?

I sure know what is scorpion.


But that was new to me. I thought that they live near Africa.


" Europe hosts a surprisingly high diversity of scorpions. At the moment, 25 valid species are reported from Europe (the species known from the Asian part of Turkey are excluded). Scorpions are reported from France, Monaco, Spain, Portugal, Italy, San Marino, Malta, Switzerland, Austria, Cyprus, Greece, Turkey, Russia (North Caucasus), Ukraine (Crimea only), and the Balkan countries. In addition, an introduced colony of scorpions in southern England has been known since the 18th. century. Scorpion findings have also been reported from Germany, Holland, Norway, Denmark and Sweden, but no data indicate that these countries host permanent populations (as England does). These scorpions have probably been accidental stowaways."



.
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Mici
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« Reply #27 on: February 10, 2007, 08:06:43 AM »

hmmm, finsky, i think these pseudoscorpions aren't living in just one region of the world. i think they don't depend on the climate, they depend on bees, so if bees were to live on antarctica, so would these little creatures, inside the hive of course. mr. bush didn't suggest he has them in his hives, he only completed my statement, and so far, he was right. if he has them, i don't know, neither have i said so, but we are certainly talking about them and i have posted a picture of one.
finsky, i hope this doesn't insult you but just maybe you don't know the true meaning of this "pseudo", it means, like i've said before, "not real" "not true", meaning, they only resemble scorpions, look like but aren't.
and you said you've seen them in front of you're hives, probably you're right, since they can't live inside the hive, they decided to live in front, there is surely enough food.
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Finsky
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« Reply #28 on: February 10, 2007, 09:08:55 AM »

finsky, i hope this doesn't insult you but just maybe you don't know the true meaning of this "pseudo", it means, like i've said before, "not real" "not true",


I can tell you that I am master in science in biology, and I may se from you writings that you are not specialized in biology.

Pseudo-word is very common in scientific names. It means false. Pseudocarpus, Pseudotzuga,

Quote
hmmm, finsky, i think these pseudoscorpions aren't living in just one region of the world. i think they don't depend on the climate, they depend on bees


Now you are talking pseudo science  cheesy

I have seen pseudoscorpions in garden compost.   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pseudoscorpion

Pseudoscorpions seems to everywhere but bees are not. They eat smaller arthropods.


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Cindi
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« Reply #29 on: February 10, 2007, 10:41:24 AM »

I've never seen pseudoscorpions in my gardens or beehives.  Wonder if they live here too, would be interesting to see them.  I am looking at sites to investigate.  Thanks all for the cool information and greatest of days.  Cindi
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Mici
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« Reply #30 on: February 10, 2007, 10:58:44 AM »

finsky sorry, i withdraw my accusation!
of course i'm no biologist. anyway, i'd like to know what the whole point of your saying is? that pseudoscorpions NEVER live with bees or what? i really don't see your point.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #31 on: February 10, 2007, 04:01:01 PM »

>They eat smaller arthropods.

Exactly.
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Cindi
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« Reply #32 on: February 11, 2007, 07:23:13 PM »

These pseudoscorpions are very tiny little arachnids.  I probably wouldn't notice one cause of the size.  Anywhere from 1/12 inch to 1/2 inch, teeny tiny.  Greatest of days.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Finsky
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« Reply #33 on: February 12, 2007, 12:38:23 AM »

These pseudoscorpions are very tiny little arachnids.  I probably wouldn't notice one cause of the size.  Anywhere from 1/12 inch to 1/2 inch, teeny tiny.  Greatest of days.  Cindi

Soil is full of many kinds of small arachnids. If you put something to eat on soil, it is soon full of life.

It has been wroten that arachnids on bottom board have something usefull to do with bee diseases and acid manipulation kills bugs and so on.
It is fine story but is it true. It is nice to believe it but I do not.  Many people think that in nature all have usefull purpose and for human of course. This is quite near to superstition.  - What about screened bottom? World end to bees.
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Cindi
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« Reply #34 on: February 12, 2007, 09:08:45 AM »

Finsky, what do you mean?
What about screened bottom? World end to bees.

I remember you saying once that you do not use SBB, but have tried them.  I cannot find the post.  Will you please again of your experience with SBBs.  Greatest of days.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Finsky
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« Reply #35 on: February 12, 2007, 09:35:09 AM »

Finsky, what do you mean?
What about screened bottom? World end to bees.


It is black humour. If beekeepers are that opininion that small bugs are usefull on hive bottom, what happens then when it is screened bottom and no food/rubbish to bugs?
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Cindi
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« Reply #36 on: February 12, 2007, 09:37:11 AM »

Hq, you indeed possess the black humour.  Guess "keeping" pseudoscorpions would only work with a solid bottomboard, ha, LOL.  Greatest of days.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Finsky
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« Reply #37 on: February 12, 2007, 11:44:49 AM »

Hq, you indeed possess the black humour.  Guess "keeping" pseudoscorpions would only work with a solid bottomboard, ha, LOL.  Greatest of days.  Cindi

Hah hah, at last I succeeded grin
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Finsky
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« Reply #38 on: February 12, 2007, 11:58:31 AM »



I have wondered If bees have hive in tree trunk on in the gap of two walls, I wonder what they have on the bottom of hole and what kind of animals are there?  I have never seen natural hive in that circumtancies.
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Jerrymac
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« Reply #39 on: February 12, 2007, 06:08:54 PM »

I believe the idea of open bottom comes from bees that build hives up on over hangs of rocky cliffs where everything falls a hundred feet down from the nest. Then the screen is to keep other critters from getting in.
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