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Author Topic: HARDY TEA TREES  (Read 2498 times)

Offline BEE C

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HARDY TEA TREES
« on: October 12, 2006, 05:37:29 AM »
Does anyone know of a hardy species of tea tree (leptospermum) that is commonly available in nurseries?  Hardy to around -12 degrees?  I don't have a greenhouse but we have sheltered areas with warm winter micro climates and would like to try one, or two or three...

Offline Cindi

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Re: HARDY TEA TREES
« Reply #1 on: November 19, 2006, 09:29:05 PM »
Does anyone know of a hardy species of tea tree (leptospermum) that is commonly available in nurseries?  Hardy to around -12 degrees?  I don't have a greenhouse but we have sheltered areas with warm winter micro climates and would like to try one, or two or three...
I don't know what part of B.C. you live in, but here on the southwest coast they can be grown with winter protection.  I have been communicating with a man on Saltspring Island.  Now this island is very temperate, it is quite incredible what can be grown in their area.  I am surprised.  This man I have been communicating with is going to actually be sending me some seeds for the Leptopsermum, it may take a few years to flower, I will be researching more on the species.  I don't think that there are any that are hardy to minus 12, are you speaking in C or F?  I do not know it all, but I have a feeling they are pretty tender little trees, probably not growing much more than say about 10 feet.  Regards.  Cindi
There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service

Offline BEE C

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Re: HARDY TEA TREES
« Reply #2 on: November 25, 2006, 03:53:30 PM »
Hey cindi,
I thought I would respond here so everyone can read it.  I'm not too sure of which species is which but a friend of mine is New Zealand right now getting some seeds of Manuka and tea trees for me.  Saltspring is a really temperate area for sure.  As you know, you and I both have snow right now with more on the way, whereas at sea level (pitt meadows) there is none yet.  I've been looking for a larger greenhouse to house these two species, I don't mind heating a greenhouse, if it means some manuka honey infusion later on...let me know when your tea trees bloom i'll send over my bees... :-D

Offline Cindi

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Re: HARDY TEA TREES
« Reply #3 on: November 26, 2006, 12:03:06 AM »
Hey cindi,
I thought I would respond here so everyone can read it.  I'm not too sure of which species is which but a friend of mine is New Zealand right now getting some seeds of Manuka and tea trees for me.  Saltspring is a really temperate area for sure.  As you know, you and I both have snow right now with more on the way, whereas at sea level (pitt meadows) there is none yet.  I've been looking for a larger greenhouse to house these two species, I don't mind heating a greenhouse, if it means some manuka honey infusion later on...let me know when your tea trees bloom i'll send over my bees... :-D
Steve, I have received seeds of the Teatree from  Banana Joe on Saltspring.  He grows winter hardy tropicals on his island, that is Saltspring, gathered seed from one of his teatrees last year.  I am flabergasted at what kind of tropical palms, etc. that can actually be grown in our southwestern British Columbia, even probably north of Pitt Meadows.  It will take several years for the teatree to bloom.  Banana Joe said that he got his as a 1 gallon pot (now that was probably a two year old seedling), and he gathered seed this year, as a 10 year old plant.  So we shall attempt the tea tree grow....Anyways, bring on the snow, haven't seen much of that is some time.  Cindi
There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service

Offline mick

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Re: HARDY TEA TREES
« Reply #4 on: December 02, 2006, 07:38:51 PM »
Leptospermum Scoparium, (manuka) is the go if you can get some seed. Tolerates snow no problems. Its ths one the Kiwis use for medicinal honey.

Lept. laevigatum (coastal tea tree) is the go if you are near the beach.

They are as tough as guts, just dont let em get wet feet.

If you get desperate you can brew the leaves of the Scoparium for tea. Old capn Cook did this in New Zealand, hence the name tea tree.

Offline Cindi

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Re: HARDY TEA TREES
« Reply #5 on: December 02, 2006, 08:49:42 PM »
Mick great info, so I will be attempting to grow Leptospermum Scoparium, as I have obtained the seed.  I have the ability here to protect young trees if the need arises, but if the manuka can tolerate snow, it surely will grow at my place unhindered.  I will be sowing seed after Christmas, when I actually come out of the winter with the desire for the seed propogation that moves over me like a blanket.  I am not near the beach so the l. laevigatum would not survive.  Thanks.  Great day, Cindi.
There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service