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Author Topic: Why are top bar hives perceived as inferior?  (Read 16498 times)
wff
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« on: January 03, 2007, 04:47:31 PM »

Is it just because they're different than the norm?
Is it lack of gadgets and accessories? (easily overcome)
Is it because they don't use foundation?
Is it just because "lower tech" is associated with "lower quality"?
Is it because they move horizontally instead of vertically?
Is it just because we know how to manage vertially better than we know how to manage horizontally?
Is it just fear of change after 100 years of success with langs?

Lots of people have told me they're just inferior to langs.  Most people who tell me that have never used them.  I'm a long way from being an expert at managing bees in anything, but I've used both and I don't see any inherent reason that a colony can't be just as productive in a TBH as in a lang.  Is it just perception and fear of change, or is there a real, tangible limitation that I'm not seeing?
« Last Edit: January 03, 2007, 08:14:41 PM by wff » Logged
Michael Bush
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« Reply #1 on: January 03, 2007, 07:51:59 PM »

>Is it just because they're different than the norm?

Yes.

>Is it lack of gadgets and accessories? (easily overcome)

Maybe.

>Is it because they don't use foundation?

Probably.

>Is it just because "lower tech" is associated with "lower quality"?

Yes.

>Is it because they move horizontally instead of vertically?

I don't know but there does seem to be a lot of prejudice against that (ask Finsky, he hates long hives).

>Is it just because we know how to manage vertially better than we know how to manage horizontally?

Yes.

>Is it just fear of change after 100 years of success with langs?

Not so much that as every bee book since the late 1800s has praised the Langstroth hive and cursed everything else as unscientific and unhygienic.  That's a lot of propaganda to overcome.

The main disadvantage is they require more FREQUENT work to keep them from swarming and keep them productive.  Those manipulations require less lifting, but if your hives are in an outyard 60 miles away (not uncommon) they are not very practical.  On the other hand if they are in your backyard, you'll work less and lift less.

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« Reply #2 on: January 03, 2007, 08:33:55 PM »

Not so much that as every bee book since the late 1800s has praised the Langstroth hive and cursed everything else as unscientific and unhygienic.  That's a lot of propaganda to overcome.

The main disadvantage is they require more FREQUENT work to keep them from swarming and keep them productive.  Those manipulations require less lifting, but if your hives are in an outyard 60 miles away (not uncommon) they are not very practical.  On the other hand if they are in your backyard, you'll work less and lift less.

Propaganda is a powerful tool.  I've always thought it interesting that most of the equipment supply houses sell "how to" beekeeping guides that make it sound like you need every gadget they sell.

I can see where more frequent work could be a draw back, especially for someone with several spread out bee yards.  But that's a disadvantage to the beekeeper, not to the bees, and it can be overcome by management decisions.  Lay out your beeyards like a trapline and you should have no problem hitting 5 or six different yards each weekend, even if the nodes are 60 miles from home.
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Finsky
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« Reply #3 on: January 04, 2007, 05:16:18 AM »

.
In your case you may play without foundations but it does not help bees beyond the edge of bees' natural area.

Foundation has 100 g wax ( 0,2 lbs). When bees draw the foundation they exrevere wax same measure.

For one Langstroth comb they need  200 g wax. Whole box need 2 kg wax.  1 kg wax needs  6-8 kg honey + pollen.  To draw combs without foundations needs  15 kg honey (30 lbs). So half is saved if you use foundation.

Feeding larvae strains young bees most. Second big  effort is to exrecete wax and build combs.

Natural beekeeping is a exertion to bees, it is more expencive than "commercial", and gives a lot smaller honey yield.  I se no advantage in beekeeping without foundations.  But if you feel better when you have "natural beekeeping" in Alaska, it is good for your soul.

No beekeping is natural in Finland or Alaska because bees cannot live here in nature as feral bees. They survive short time and die off. Varroa destroyed all our "natural" bees. But they were merely escaped swarms.

.   
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empilolo
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« Reply #4 on: January 04, 2007, 06:00:15 AM »


In all fairness, I would say both hive types have their differences and, in consequence, their uses (and fan clubs).

Unless I eventually succeed breeding a gentler African Bee (or somebody else hands them to me on a platter), I won't ever consider using a Langstroth.

Now a lot depends on perspective. Finsky is looking at Honey in a capital way. Well, my wife is going organic local cosmetics, using the TBH "excess" wax as a raw material. Just look at what women are prepared to spend on cosmetics and you will agree with me that honey is of little consequence (to most).

Using appropriate management techniques, according to the type of hive, they "probably" produce on a par. Here, I am in full agreement with Finsky that production depends on the quantity and quality of forage for the bees, but not on the type of hive you use.

If you have a negative preconception, the results will be negative if you ever try. Sorry Finsky, but if you ever try a TBH, the api-bards will sing epic songs about it for decades.
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Finsky
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« Reply #5 on: January 04, 2007, 07:21:34 AM »


 Sorry Finsky, but if you ever try a TBH, the api-bards will sing epic songs about it for decades.

Yes, I have had many kind of epic songs. I searches always something new but not only on the are of beekeping.

I begun my beekeeping 45 years ago at the age of 15. I have seen many things.  I started when beekeeping was in Finland near level of TBH.  My very good teacher has worked in Canada and brought American way to nurse bees. 

Most wjat I hate now that adult beekeeprs cannot read and cannot find knowledge what is in this wold. They just like to find their own mehtod and explane them with their imagination. Eglish people I wonder because they have knowledge in internet in their own langusage and still they are able to search and learn.

I have all my life kept nature as my hobby. I have had all kinds of animals, and I have had orchids and many difficult flowers.

I am master in science in biology and studied in university.  I have  researches education and it teach how to play with facts.  I have worked in envinronmental protection.  It was awfull. Half of work was dig out information but still you should speakt where you do not believe.

I cannot se nothing funny or interesting in TBH hives.  They do not satify my need of knowledge. It is just between ears in imagination.

If I want to play imagination play I have had hobby 30 years stock investing. Now I have studied it and by the way in the year 2006  my brutto earning rate was 49%.


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wff
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« Reply #6 on: January 04, 2007, 11:58:41 AM »

.
In your case you may play without foundations but it does not help bees beyond the edge of bees' natural area.

Foundation has 100 g wax ( 0,2 lbs). When bees draw the foundation they exrevere wax same measure.

For one Langstroth comb they need  200 g wax. Whole box need 2 kg wax.  1 kg wax needs  6-8 kg honey + pollen.  To draw combs without foundations needs  15 kg honey (30 lbs). So half is saved if you use foundation.

Feeding larvae strains young bees most. Second big  effort is to exrecete wax and build combs.

So it sounds like the foundationless aspect is what you object to.  I can understand that as a concern.  I'm not sure I buy the claim that it takes twice as much honey and pollen to draw comb from scratch, because I don't think there's an equal amount of wax in the foundation as in the cell walls.

If that is the primary weakness, what do you think of Michael Bush's horizontal hives with frames?  Are they equal to a lang?

Quote
Natural beekeeping is a exertion to bees, it is more expencive than "commercial",

This is the same argument I hear about farming anything in Alaska. They say "we have 6 inch walls in our barns in Wyoming so you'll have to have 14" walls in Fairbanks to make it easy on the animals, and that will be very expensive."  They say "our livestock doesn't go outside when it's 0F so you'll have to keep yours inside all winter long, and that will be very expensive."  They say "you can't have angora goats kid when it's colder than 40F or they won't survive, so you'll have to schedule your kidding to be in the summer, then you'll be weaning in the winter and won't be able to sell kids until the next year."  When I say you can get around some of those things by using different methods, they say "Oh, you'll fail if you don't use state-of-the-art modern agri-industrial methods."  They are always wrong.

Intensive management using industrially proven methods is very expensive in the sub-arctic, no matter what you're producing.  Extensive management, with intensive focus on some key aspects (exactly what TBHs were designed for) is almost always as successful, less resource-intensive (though sometimes more labor intensive), and less expensive in the long run.  It is certainly possible that bees will be the species that are an exception to that, but it seems unlikely to me.

Quote
and gives a lot smaller honey yield.

I've heard this claimed many times, but I've never seen it tested in a controlled experiment.  Even if it is true, though, consider that honey is not the only product of a hive.  There is a huge exchange in beeswax in my area, and it's virtually all brought in from outside.  Also, it's not hard in the summer time to find jars of locally produced honey at the farmers' market.  However, there's a huge market base of people interested in organic/animal-friendly/naturally produced foods here.  If I can produce cut comb honey in "more bee-friendly hives" then I can double the price and draw the same income from half as many hives.  Again, it's no different than other things I produce.  Most angora goat keepers say if you're not making money on mohair, you're not making money on your goats.  I sell all the mohair I can produce, but I make more selling meat goats and goat kids.

Quote
  I se no advantage in beekeeping without foundations.  But if you feel better when you have "natural beekeeping" in Alaska, it is good for your soul.

Good for your soul is the most important commodity of all.  Otherwise I wouldn't live where I do, I wouldn't be farming, and I wouldn't be an artist.

Quote
No beekeping is natural in Finland or Alaska because bees cannot live here in nature as feral bees. They survive short time and die off. Varroa destroyed all our "natural" bees. But they were merely escaped swarms.

I won't disagree with that.  As I've said before, very little on my farm is natural in Alaska.  Firewood and lingonberries, yes, everything else wouldn't survive one winter here without my help.  The biggest organic farmer in the area grows most of his produce in greenhouses or heated raised beds.  Nothing natural about that.  I'm not the one who said the TBH it was natural.  However  I am convinced it's more "bee friendly," and (besides being good for my soul) I'm positive I can turn that into a marketing advantage.


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wff
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« Reply #7 on: January 04, 2007, 12:17:48 PM »


Most wjat I hate now that adult beekeeprs cannot read and cannot find knowledge what is in this wold. They just like to find their own mehtod and explane them with their imagination. Eglish people I wonder because they have knowledge in internet in their own langusage and still they are able to search and learn.

I have all my life kept nature as my hobby. I have had all kinds of animals, and I have had orchids and many difficult flowers.

I am master in science in biology and studied in university.  I have  researches education and it teach how to play with facts.  I have worked in envinronmental protection.  It was awfull. Half of work was dig out information but still you should speakt where you do not believe.

I cannot se nothing funny or interesting in TBH hives.  They do not satify my need of knowledge. It is just between ears in imagination.

If I want to play imagination play I have had hobby 30 years stock investing. Now I have studied it and by the way in the year 2006  my brutto earning rate was 49%.

You and I have much in common, Finsky.  I also hold a Master of Science in Natural Resources Management, and have been trained as a researcher.  I also work in environmental and land management.  I also have kept animals and plants all my life.  I also research things in great depth and strive to make informed decisions.  I also often get frustrated with people who have the same information available to them but come to differnt conclusions than I do.  But I have to remember that that's how science works, and how life works.  There are many different ways to achieve the same end.  I build mathematical models of natural systems, and I know that changing a few apparently insignificant factors can entirely change the outcome of a system.  That can make small mistakes turn into a disaster, but it can also be used to develop innovative managment techniques.

The beekeeper I worked for in the 1970's (I wouldn't call him a mentor) is no longer alive, but if he was he would call me "dumber than a doodle bug" for considering anything other than his methods.  He'd probably call you crazy for using insulated hives and terrarium heaters and for not using queen excluders, too.  He'd probably call Michael Bush a witch, because he makes things work with methods that are totally contrary to what he believed possible.

Which brings me back to my original question.  It sounds as though the foundationless aspect is your primary objection to top bar hives.  If that's the case, what do you think of Michael Bush's horizontal hives with frames and foundation?
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Finsky
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« Reply #8 on: January 04, 2007, 02:13:52 PM »

, what do you think of Michael Bush's horizontal hives with frames and foundation?

When I started my beekeeping, horizontal hives were the most used 50 years ago in Finland. M Brother moved to northern Sweden 1970 and there were no Langstroths. - There is nothing new to.  When I started, I went to library, I looked what is good hive and then I made them 4 hives. They were so called long hives "turn around" hives. Two entrances and you may devide hive room with wall.  They were 2 years and I burned them and I made Langstroth hives.

Now it is difficult to find horizontal hives in Finland. They were very heavy. Beekeepers are old men mostly. Average age is between 70 - 80 years.

Why Lanstroths and 2/3 mediums? - They are easy to handle. There is nothing more mystery. It is easy to get eguipments what you nees.
Many beekeeprs are fond of construct all kind of bottom boards, inner covers and what ever. They like beekeeping as mechanics. Beekeeprs try many kinds of hivesystems and  love them.

What I need is easy handle and easy to myself. I take my hives every year to outer yadrs and I try to find good pastures. It is very importart to me that hiveparst fits to each other.

I have seen that women are not able to lift even full medium box from top of hive. In this case horizontal hives would be coud when that lady does not transfer hives from her home.  Her hives swarmed awfully because she cannot nurse them. But she had not even done good bottom boards or inner covers. It is better to say nothing.

If someone like horizontal hives there is no excuses if he does it.  There is no reason to ban other hive models. In Eastern Erope hive are best to be very heavy that they are not easy to steal. That is great advantage.

My style and opinion is that get a good queen, get big hive and fill them with bees and take hives to best pastures. That is my formula and I have enough to do with that.



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Finsky
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« Reply #9 on: January 04, 2007, 02:20:29 PM »


40 years old  horizontal hive from Finland "turn around hive". Now it is decoration of post box.

And second hive is from Russia. The most beautyfull hive what I have seen. Lets hope that it is top bar hive.






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« Reply #10 on: January 04, 2007, 02:24:55 PM »

  I'm not sure I buy the claim that it takes twice as much honey and pollen to draw comb from scratch, because I don't think there's an equal amount of wax in the foundation as in the cell walls.
[/quote]

Never mind. I just know that it is. And there are a lot researches on issue.

I just told what I know and it is not worth religion.
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wff
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« Reply #11 on: January 04, 2007, 02:59:24 PM »


40 years old  horizontal hive from Finland "turn around hive". Now it is decoration of post box.

Interesting. Looking at it, I'm guessing the top 1/3 is a super and it has frames inside?

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And second hive is from Russia. The most beautyfull hive what I have seen. Lets hope that it is top bar hive.

Yes, it is beautiful, and the beekeeper is pretty attractive too!  grin  But I'll bet it's not a top bar hive.  I'd guess it's two deeps and the interior of the roof is not available to the bees.

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« Reply #12 on: January 04, 2007, 03:20:22 PM »

, I'm guessing the top 1/3 is a super and it has frames inside?


The the outer cover is deeply telescopic. The line in the middle of hive is bottom edge of cover.

Frames were  feet x feet .  (30 cm x 30 cm)
The lowest chest was for 20 frames.
Supers were what ever woden box and frames useally lower.

Now queen lays so much there is not enough room for big colony.

What is important it has thick insulation gap inside walls and saw dust there.

In boath ends there was similar entrance. In pic it is closed.



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Jorn Johanesson
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« Reply #13 on: January 04, 2007, 04:09:15 PM »

In Denmark we still have horizontal hives like this shown by fin sky. You can also by drawings to such hives. But they are only in use by old timers and those with a bad back. Limitation is 18-22 frames in the hive and one or to magazines of 10 frames on top.

As easy to work with (Handling is frame by frame) as difficult to move around with. Two men are needed, because not alone the weight of bees and wax but dimensions is unhandy handling, and then water accumulated in the insulation of newspaper, wool or whatever was used. I stated out with four hives of this type, bought from an old-timer beekeeper that gave beekeeping up. It took me two years to realize that this was not the type for me. I wanted to move my bees around to get Carnolian and heather honey, plus benefit from the gardens around, so vertical hives with boxes of ten frames each was the solution, later Lang troth size. If I as bee inspector had meet top bar hives with not changeable frames or frameless combs I had ordered those burnt, because they could not be easily examined for diseases.
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wff
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« Reply #14 on: January 04, 2007, 04:18:40 PM »

If I as bee inspector had meet top bar hives with not changeable frames or frameless combs I had ordered those burnt, because they could not be easily examined for diseases.

I'm not sure I understand.  A top bar hive, by definition, has combs attached to bars that can be removed one at a time.  If they can be individually lifted and examined, what does it matter whether they have frames around them or not?
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« Reply #15 on: January 04, 2007, 04:33:30 PM »

If I as bee inspector had meet top bar hives with not changeable frames or frameless combs I had ordered those burnt, because they could not be easily examined for diseases.


the old way of actually beeKEEPING and not beefarming, what it is today
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« Reply #16 on: January 04, 2007, 04:34:19 PM »

, I'm guessing the top 1/3 is a super and it has frames inside?


The the outer cover is deeply telescopic. The line in the middle of hive is bottom edge of cover.

Frames were  feet x feet .  (30 cm x 30 cm)
The lowest chest was for 20 frames.
Supers were what ever woden box and frames useally lower.

Did they use foundation in the 1'x1' frames?  If so, was it cut from sheets, or molded, or did someone manufacture foundation in that size? 

Quote
Now queen lays so much there is not enough room for big colony.

I'm not sure I understand what you mean here.  20 12x12 frames would be approximately the same volume as two deeps on a lang.  That should house a large colony if there's some way to super, shouldn't it?  As Michael pointed out above, it would take more frequent work than stacking 5 or 6 boxes high.  But if you could visit weekly, isn't it enough?

Quote
What is important it has thick insulation gap inside walls and saw dust there.

That is similar to the TBH I am working on building, except I'm using polystyrene insulation boards.  It's much lighter than sawdust, much better insulator, and doesn't hold moisture.

It goes to show, though, that horizontal hives are not new, and not just African TBHs.  Langstroth hives certainly have some advantages for the beekeeper, and especially for migratory beekeepers.  I'm still not convinced they are inherently better or more productive, though.
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« Reply #17 on: January 04, 2007, 04:47:20 PM »

if it doesn't hold moist it also doesn't breathe. try imagine living in a cealed of house?

Off course horizontal hives aren't new, in fact, they are the oldest manmade wodden hives.

http://forum.beemaster.com/index.php?topic=6211.0
http://forum.beemaster.com/index.php?topic=6172.0
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Jorn Johanesson
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« Reply #18 on: January 04, 2007, 05:07:15 PM »

I'm not sure I understand.  A top bar hive, by definition, has combs attached to bars that can be removed one at a time.  If they can be individually lifted and examined, what does it matter whether they have frames around them or not?

A frame around is stabilizing the comb so that it can be turned up down and a around making it possible to examine the comb in its entirely. Try to turn a new wireless frameless comb up down when there is brood and homey in it. And I am not sure that you can lift all those out if the combs are build directly on the bars, that serves as roof. I would not waste my time examining this hive, just demand it burned. When I say this, you must be aware of that we have very strict rules about keeping bees here in Denmark. I am not sure it will serve the american way of doing things.
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Jorn Johanesson
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« Reply #19 on: January 04, 2007, 05:21:04 PM »

if it doesn't hold moist it also doesn't breathe. try imagine living in a cealed of house?

Off course horizontal hives aren't new, in fact, they are the oldest manmade wodden hives.

http://forum.beemaster.com/index.php?topic=6211.0
http://forum.beemaster.com/index.php?topic=6172.0


Available polystyrene hives in Denmark:



LN -DK12x10 - NM - LS - DA.
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IndianaBrown
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« Reply #20 on: January 04, 2007, 05:54:11 PM »

Polystryene is available in the US from at least a few sources. 
For example: http://betterbee.com/departments2.asp?dept=118&bot=83

So far, during my first year, I have been very pleased with my polystyrene Langsforth hives.  But since I don't need to move the hives in my backyard I eventually want to try out a combo hive:
http://bwrangler.farvista.net/gcom.htm
However I doubt that this design would not be very practical for commercial beekeping.
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« Reply #21 on: January 04, 2007, 08:27:15 PM »

>I'm not sure I understand.  A top bar hive, by definition, has combs attached to bars that can be removed one at a time.  If they can be individually lifted and examined, what does it matter whether they have frames around them or not?

Exactly.

On the cost of drawing wax:

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesharvest.htm
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« Reply #22 on: January 05, 2007, 12:43:19 AM »

An educated idiot is a person who is womeone who no longer believes inventiveness is necessary. 
If you lock yourself into doing things one way and one way only you only grow in your ignorance.  My mentor, I think, would embrace todays innovations and love to see the way I do things now as much of the equipment I use is so different with the basic Langstroth that he started with in 1899.  He taught me to explore the needs of the bees and that there was more than one way of doing things. 
Finsky has developed a good system that works well for him and would work well for anyone wishing to maximize honey production.  Unfortunately, Finsky frequently comes across as a person who can not see why someone would not wish to operate on the same baises as he does.  It might surprise him to find out that I am not concerned with whether I get a honey crop or not.  Getting and selling honey is not the reason I keep bees. 
I sometimes lose hives because my experiments don't always work like I think they should.  But, in any event, I continue to learn about bees and now know a variety of ways of doing the same thing so I have options.  Finsky got to where he is by not shunning different ideas but by finding new methods outside the box, it is to bad that he now sometimes seems to ridicule the experiments of those who want to learn by their own hands.
American is a land of ideas, that is what has made us great.  It affects everything we do.  In my travelings around the world I found that People of other countries cannot understand the maverick (feirce individual independence) that Americans exhibit.  They see it as a weakness--failing to see it as our greatest strength. 
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« Reply #23 on: January 05, 2007, 12:47:24 AM »


I'm not sure I understand what you mean here.  20 12x12 frames would be approximately the same volume as two deeps on a lang. [/quote]

50 years ago we had mostly German Black crossbreeded bees. They were mostly small colonies because big ones swarmed twice. Now bee colonies are about 3 fold bigger that 50 years ago.

When beekeeper had a big colony, telescopic cover rises over its limit and cover was hanging on supers. Nothing good in this style.

Our wax factories make large plate and he cuts what ever size. 30 x 30 cm was very common size and sold  ready. I use to bye foundations whic are 10 mm lower than frame gap.
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« Reply #24 on: January 05, 2007, 12:54:56 AM »


I met this summer 83 years old beekeeper . I have seen his hives during 20 years beside road. He has in the middle of summer only 2 box at it's best.

I asked where are bees from? He said that xxxx. I had bought two years ago queens from xxxx and another hive had 9 boxes and another 7 boxes. I stopped those raising because they had much chalkbrood.

However that man had a model how to keep hives "under horizont". Not much to lift.  He has a stock which is like 50 years ago. He had nursed bees 53 years.
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« Reply #25 on: January 05, 2007, 11:51:39 AM »

When beekeeper had a big colony, telescopic cover rises over its limit and cover was hanging on supers. Nothing good in this style.

OK, now I understand.  The cover wasn't built to handle enough supers for a big colony.  That's why Michael says top bar hives take more frequent work. 

However that man had a model how to keep hives "under horizont". Not much to lift.  He has a stock which is like 50 years ago. He had nursed bees 53 years.

As Michael Bush says, "anything will work if you let it." 

I worked for a very traditional beekeeper 30 years ago using langs in a much warmer climate.  I didn't learn much from him because he wasn't interested in teaching.  He was a mean boss, and it was best just to do what he said and stay out of his way.  He saw a langstroth hive as the closest he could come to a brute force way to get what he wanted from the bees.  I might have become more interested in bees much earlier if it hadn't been for him and his attitude.

Three years ago I decided to have some bees of my own.  Getting them was easy, and getting advice locally was easy as long as I did what I was told and didn't question thier methods.  On overwintering bees, the advice was "don't bother trying - it's just a game and it's a waste of time."  I had read about different methods used in Canada and about different hive types and about small cell methods, and I kept asking "what if."  I was too stuborn to accept that killing bees was the only option here, and soon none of the beekeepers I know locally would talk with me any more (there are some who I didn't know then who are a bit more open minded, but they're still not enthusiastic about wintering bees).

I've tried and failed to overwinter bees here twice now, always in top bar hives.  I don't believe the hives are the reason I failed.  I'm sold on top bar hives.  Lots of people tell me they're inferior, they're just toys, that they can't possibly produce as well as langs, but no one has been able to give a specific reason for that, and most who don't like them have never tried them.  Mr. Johanesson's comment about "I'm not going to waste my time learning about them, you should just burn them" is typical.  That kind of closed mindedness frustrates me, and that's where my original question came from.  Too many people just aren't willing to let them work.

Finsky, I hope I don't appear to be challenging or trying to be argumentative with you specifically.  I'm grateful for all your advice, and you've taught me more about keeping bees at high latitudes just from reading your posts on this forum than all the Alaskan beekeepers I've talked to for four years.  Your system works for you, and would probably work for me if I adopted it, but I'm confident that I can incorporate much of what I learn from you into a system using top bar hives too.  I respect your knowledge and experience a lot.
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« Reply #26 on: January 05, 2007, 01:36:27 PM »

  Finsky got to where he is by not shunning different ideas but by finding new methods outside the box, it is to bad that he now sometimes seems to ridicule the experiments of those who want to learn by their own hands.
American is a land of ideas, that is what has made us great. 

Well said Brian.  Ofcourse everyone does what he want. Almost all are here adult wise people who work and manage well.

But as long as I am this forum, I will change the future of American beekeeping and I am going to stop your vain efforts and you will shoot right into the goal, what ever it is. That is so simple. cool
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Jorn Johanesson
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« Reply #27 on: January 05, 2007, 01:47:32 PM »


Johanesson's comment about "I'm not going to waste my time learning about them, you should just burn them"

Sorry I did not mean that. I said as a Bee inspector I would not waste my time. But I am not a bee inspector and I am dam interested in learning about other ways of doing beekeeping. That’s why I travel around to learn. I have seen Romanian Hives, Swiss Hives, Russian Hives, Slovenian Hives Both the Stock hives and the AZ hives. I hope to travel to Makadonia this summer to visit some beekeeper friends there. I bet they will have another hive type. Also the Greek way is different. And all this due to tradition, which comes from that, it works. If you can get TBH to work in Alaska, I for sure will clap my hands. And this is not ironic said. We had an experiment going transferring the Black original Nordic bee to Greenland, just to have a gene pool. The People there reported a yield of honey about 100lbs. They have to winter in a cellar, but the last I heard was that it was still going on. The use styropor hives normal langstroth.
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« Reply #28 on: January 05, 2007, 02:21:58 PM »

I am dam interested in learning about other ways of doing beekeeping.

Hmmm. I have tried to learn beekeeping better and better during 45 years. Often first year beekeeper come and tell :" Hey old fart, why don't you  change all your system to something else."  It is like sosialism: away, but where to?
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Jorn Johanesson
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« Reply #29 on: January 05, 2007, 02:37:53 PM »

I am not sying I will adapt to, I am saying I am interested in how you are doing, be it as Honey Stealing or in modern way. I am not paticipating as a teacher, but just as interested in beekeeping.
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« Reply #30 on: January 05, 2007, 03:22:07 PM »


As I have wroten, beekeepers may have very opposite methods to nurse bees. However they get same yield from same pastures. And why. - And if beekeeper leave 50% of hives yield for winter food he has half yield compared to "greedy beekeeper". But fact is that bees survive with sugar very well over winter. 

Facts and feelings ?  Feeling have much motivation.

Bees are those who gather nectrar and pastures rule how much nectar is on fields to be gathered.

Most of stuff what beekeepers keep as important, are only for beekeepers  convinience. Many think that blue hive would be good but if bees have white hive, they must come home, what ever they think about colors.

Top bars, Langtroth, tree hole, stryrofoam what ever, bees do not know better life and they do not know that they may have alternatives. If they knew they surely would escape away and very far. Bees are not clever. If they were, they will attack on me at once when they se me.
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« Reply #31 on: January 05, 2007, 11:06:15 PM »

[quote author=Jorn Johanesson link=topic=7236.msg43832#msg43832

Sorry I did not mean that. I said as a Bee inspector I would not waste my time. But I am not a bee inspector and I am dam interested in learning about other ways of doing beekeeping. [/quote]

I'm sorry if I misinterpreted your comment.

Quote
We had an experiment going transferring the Black original Nordic bee to Greenland, just to have a gene pool. The People there reported a yield of honey about 100lbs. They have to winter in a cellar, but the last I heard was that it was still going on. The use styropor hives normal langstroth.

I'd love to read more about that.  Is there any information on the internet about it?
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Jorn Johanesson
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« Reply #32 on: January 06, 2007, 05:18:42 AM »

I'd love to read more about that.  Is there any information on the internet about it?

I am afraid there is nothing written about this project. And I also fear the reason is that it might have failed. But what in the first run happened was that the Black Nordic bee (only remaining population on the Ireland Laesoe) was threatened by mixing up by Italian crossbreeds. This story is found on my web. But some beekeepers wanted to keep this gene pool alive, so they contacted two Greenland sheep keepers who agreed to manage 4 hives as a start. All I know about this project after the start, is that the report of honey yield was 40 lbs a hive first year and 100lbs next year. The Danish leader of the project is no longer a beekeeper, and has disappeared from the beekeeping world. So I am afraid the story ended there. But I have put a question into the Danish Beekeeper Society.

What is important here is that the hives are stored through the winter in a shelter of some kind. And the hives were Styropor Langstroth Hives.
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Jorn Johanesson
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« Reply #33 on: January 06, 2007, 06:13:33 AM »

I'd love to read more about that.  Is there any information on the internet about it?


I found this : http://www.beesfordevelopment.org/info/info/species/beekeeping-in-greenland.shtml

Ole Hertz is a photographer concentrating on development beekeeping.
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« Reply #34 on: January 06, 2007, 08:33:48 AM »

We have a beekeeper Aapo Valo who lives 200 miles from Polar Cirle to north. H ewon "best honey" competion 2005 with cloud berry honey. Ivalo you may see "on the neck of Lady Finland"

http://www.m-w.com/maps/images/maps/finland_map.gif

Ivalo landscape





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« Reply #35 on: February 14, 2007, 09:47:04 AM »


Now a lot depends on perspective. Finsky is looking at Honey in a capital way. Well, my wife is going organic local cosmetics, using the TBH "excess" wax as a raw material. Just look at what women are prepared to spend on cosmetics and you will agree with me that honey is of little consequence (to most).


An excellent point,... The markup on cosmetics  evil rolleyes
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« Reply #36 on: February 14, 2007, 10:01:40 AM »


. Well, my wife is going organic local cosmetics, using the TBH "excess" wax as a raw material. Just look at what women are prepared to spend on cosmetics and you will agree with me that honey is of little consequence (to most).

Under our laws no one cannot sell with false advertisement. But never mind. Your honey will be not used in cosmetics.
« Last Edit: February 14, 2007, 11:24:46 PM by Finsky » Logged
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« Reply #37 on: February 14, 2007, 05:19:25 PM »

Yiu know I don't know for dure must bee something about them.I think the combs might be a bit mor fragile and not easy to super I guess not sure really I'll bet Michael Bush knows
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"It's not about Honey it's not about Money It's about SURVIVAL" Charles Martin Simmon
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« Reply #38 on: February 15, 2007, 07:49:46 AM »


Mon cher Finsky.

> Under our laws no one cannot sell with false advertisement.

This is the THIRD World. No Pestizide, no Herbizide, not even industrial Fertilizers anywhere near here being used. Neither do I (or any of the other beeks I know around here) use any chemicals, powders, substances, whatsoever to treat our bees. Neither do we have foundation or any of that other fancy stuff you regularly use.

I would not claim we are organic beeks by choice - it's just that all those things are simply NOT AVAILABLE. It's another world out here.

I could get "Organic" certification as per all regulations/laws on subject I have read anywhere so far.

> Your honey will be not used in cosmetics.

umpf. She uses a concoction of soap/egg yolk/honey and rubs it into her scalp. According to her, that works wonders to regenerate her hair. Her shampoo I think contains honey and beeswax. Her body lotion beeswax.

I sometimes call her "sweets" in private - maybe I should change that to "honey".  afro  grin
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« Reply #39 on: February 15, 2007, 08:19:22 AM »


umpf. She uses a concoction of soap/egg yolk/honey and rubs it into her scalp.

My Honey ( honey) use honey too in her skin when she is in sauna.  But I am not going to recommend her to use more because it is away my selling.  - And I do not want that my wife is natural or at least organic.  I like make up.
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Jerrymac
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« Reply #40 on: February 15, 2007, 04:30:08 PM »

A woman in makeup is false advertising.  grin
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« Reply #41 on: February 15, 2007, 11:36:35 PM »

A woman in makeup is false advertising.  grin

BUT in the ring there is date "best before".
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« Reply #42 on: February 16, 2007, 10:42:40 AM »

Quote
BUT in the ring there is date "best before".


you guys are too funny!  you don't come with a date stamp on your backside??  i'm pretty sure i saw one on my husband when we were in the hot tub....it had expired long ago!!!!

i keep him anyway.  kind of like that old dried up flower in the book....no color, no smell, but good memories smiley

the things we do for you guys and this is how you treat us!!   rolleyes
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

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« Reply #43 on: March 05, 2007, 09:46:33 PM »

"Lots of people have told me they're just inferior to langs" -wff

wff- I have read the same from so many beekeepers on multiple boards.  Most people admit that "they've heard" TBH's are inferior.  I believe that Michael Bush hit the nail on the head with his quote "everything works if you let it"  One could argue that a well managed TBH would produce better than a poorly managed Langstroth hive under the same conditions.  I have done research on the web and in bee keeping books, and many claim that TBH's don't produce much or "as much" as a Lang.  Perhaps that is true in certain circumstances, however I have read articles, and heard accounts about TBH beeks who have observed their colonies in TBH's, learned the science behind it, and work with the bees naturally to increase yeild. I personally plan to try both myself.  Do my own comparisons.  There are many aspects of TBH's that intuitively make sense to me. So, I'm going with that.

Sometimes I think that the quest for "more, quicker" gets in the way of what matters most.  Of course, I am a hobbyist beekeepr, and not a commercial beekeepr depending on the production of honey for a living.  But if raising bees in a natural way is cheaper, requires less work and is therefore more beneficial to both beekeepr and bees, why not...

I guess it's all about where you come from, and how you are taught to think!   tongue
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