Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
July 23, 2014, 02:13:10 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: ATTENTION ALL NEW MEMBERS
PLEASE READ THIS OR YOUR ACCOUNT MAY BE DELETED - CLICK HERE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: honey yields  (Read 2986 times)
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #20 on: January 05, 2007, 09:44:56 AM »

Sean, you mentioned planting buttercups.  We have that species that grows like the wildfire out here in our wet Lower Mainland area.  I try to eradicate this as much as possible because it overtakes everything.  I pull it out continuously.  We have so much other stuff that is good for the bees that I can't be bothered to let the buttercup take huge hold.  I actually did not realize that there was any benefit to this noxious weed though.  I have always observed the buttercup to see if any beneficials are ever using it for forage, never see any insect of any sort on it.  Maybe your buttercup is different than ours.  I understand there are about 500 species, though. LOL.  Great day.  Cindi

Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Jerrymac
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6047


Location: Wolfforth Texas


« Reply #21 on: January 05, 2007, 10:53:46 AM »

I read somewhere that they were not any good for bees.
Logged

rainbow sunflower  Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak.   rainbow sunflower

 Jerry

My pictures.Type in password;  youview
     http://photobucket.com/albums/v225/Jerry-mac/
Kirk-o
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1059


Location: Los Angeles california


« Reply #22 on: January 05, 2007, 02:27:31 PM »

It looks to me like it could get pretty complicated.I just leave mine in the same place year around .They did real good last year I prevented swarming with unlimited brood space.
kirko
Logged

"It's not about Honey it's not about Money It's about SURVIVAL" Charles Martin Simmon
sean
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 508

Location: jamaica


« Reply #23 on: January 05, 2007, 03:14:11 PM »

Sean, you mentioned planting buttercups.  We have that species that grows like the wildfire out here in our wet Lower Mainland area.  I try to eradicate this as much as possible because it overtakes everything.  I pull it out continuously.  We have so much other stuff that is good for the bees that I can't be bothered to let the buttercup take huge hold.  I actually did not realize that there was any benefit to this noxious weed though.  I have always observed the buttercup to see if any beneficials are ever using it for forage, never see any insect of any sort on it.  Maybe your buttercup is different than ours.  I understand there are about 500 species, though. LOL.  Great day.  Cindi




cindi i will take a picture and forward it to you. i am only going by the name my mother gave me, but she has observed that the bees are always on them. I am trying to get as much stuff around as possible as there is a cane field quite near by and although i know i cant stop them i figure the closer they are to a different source of food the less sucrose i will have in my honey.
Logged
Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.16 seconds with 21 queries.

Google visited last this page June 26, 2014, 02:06:27 PM
anything