Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
December 28, 2014, 12:22:08 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Beemaster's official FACEBOOK page
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1] 2 3  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Robbing continues, so does teasing of Northern Hempispere Beekeepers  (Read 5530 times)
mick
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1450


Location: s/e melbourne australia (-)37.50S 145.0E


« on: December 30, 2006, 11:09:50 PM »

Opened up just now, to check on the stores in the top super. All 8 frames again full. That means they took from the 27th Nov to 31 Dec to draw and fill 8 frames. I would expect the middle super to be pretty much the same, and the bottom one is the brood chamber.

They were less than impressed, had to keep the smoke going, and more than my fair share of bees trying to get at me. I had one wrist taped with masking tape, they left that alone. The one thad had the sleeve pulled down over the glove, they targeted like crazy. They MUST be able to sense your sweat or something if there is the slightest gap in your clothing, or something.

One very persitant one took 5 minutes to get rid of in and outside the house, I was trying to loose him, but he was persistant.

I took 3/8 frames, replaced two with blank foundation and the other I replaced with drawn comb. I wanna measure how long to fill against fill and draw, while there is a good flow on.

Not bad for tem minutes work, nice and fresh this honey, check those cappings, nice and neat!

Left this one in, it mirrors the end frame

Ill take this one

Nice and white, even the ones in the box

And this one another keeper

Out of the way of the bees
Logged
Geoff
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 593

Location: Yinnar, Australia


« Reply #1 on: December 31, 2006, 12:31:34 AM »

They are working well Mick. You will find that the bees are not the happiest on these warm humid days like it is at our place today. It is a pity that there is not somebody with an extractor close you. Better leave a message for me when you are ready to take off honey again as we may be able to work something out if it is convenient to get my extractor to you.
Seems they are working real well and you have plenty of flora for them to work on.
   Thunder storm is close by right now so hopefully it will drop a bit of rain for us.
 Geoff.
Logged

Local Area Network in Australia - the LAN down under.
Finsky
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2791


Location: Finland


« Reply #2 on: December 31, 2006, 02:26:35 AM »


I have too much honey unsold, sorry.

But Mick, keep free combs enough for bees that they can keep on their whole foraging capacity.

Be greedy Mick, it is only way to good beekeeper. No mercy! Extract and return combs into hive. Forget all natural what you have learned from this forum.  600 lbs is a goal per hive!
Logged
mick
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1450


Location: s/e melbourne australia (-)37.50S 145.0E


« Reply #3 on: December 31, 2006, 02:39:07 AM »

I get you Finsky. I noticed how much more active they seem to be now they have more frames to fill. If the weather cooperates, I might take the rest tomorrow.
Logged
Finsky
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2791


Location: Finland


« Reply #4 on: December 31, 2006, 02:43:21 AM »


If you have brood frames like in the picture, put them topmost. Soon bees emerge and bees fill free combs with honey. You get honey away without excluder.

Logged
Yarra_Valley
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 167


Location: Healesville, Victoria, Australia


« Reply #5 on: December 31, 2006, 03:15:20 AM »

hi mick, awesome work.

geoff, where is yinnar?
Logged

Careful, my pets can smell your hives. Cool
mick
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1450


Location: s/e melbourne australia (-)37.50S 145.0E


« Reply #6 on: December 31, 2006, 03:35:41 AM »

Thankyou boys, I get it Finsky, I will have a look tomorrow for a frame of brood if its not too humid.
Logged
Geoff
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 593

Location: Yinnar, Australia


« Reply #7 on: December 31, 2006, 04:48:46 PM »

G,day to the Yarra Valley,
                                   Yinnar is 7 kilometres south of Morwell, close to Hazelwood power station and Churchill.
            Geoff.
Logged

Local Area Network in Australia - the LAN down under.
newbee101
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 290


Location: Bethel CT


WWW
« Reply #8 on: December 31, 2006, 07:53:46 PM »

Quote
Be greedy Mick, it is only way to good beekeeper
I guess I am always going to be a bad beekeeper, I give most of my honey for FREE.
I do not do it for money, (someday maybe) I make enough painting houses.
I do it for enjoyment and peace of mind.
Logged

"To bee or not to bee"
Zoot
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 466

Location: Dickerson, MD


« Reply #9 on: December 31, 2006, 09:18:10 PM »

Newbee,

I suspect that day is actually quite close. Every painter I know here in MD has long since thrown in the towel due to "competiton" with illegal aliens. I'd start stockpiling woodenware if I were you.
Logged
Scott Derrick
Expert Bee Handler
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 35

Location: Blythewood, South Carolina

Go Gamecocks!!


WWW
« Reply #10 on: January 01, 2007, 12:24:51 AM »

Good Day Mick,

Wonderful lookin frames mate. You keep rubbin it in don't cha?  Wink

Can wait to see other photos that you may have as well. I'm absolutely GREEN with envy.

Scott
Logged

My Bee Removal Photos: https://picasaweb.google.com/109455718186385256142
My Youtube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/rsderrick

"You're born. You suffer. You die. Fortunately, there's a loophole."
                                              Billy Graham
Finsky
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2791


Location: Finland


« Reply #11 on: January 01, 2007, 12:54:20 AM »


When honey flow is really coming in, beekeeper must be charp, because hive will be full in one week and then swarms come out. When foragers are on three branch, there lays whole year's work too.

I surely speak more than I do really. After all these years beepeeping is often to me a duty, because I cannot be interested all the time on cases what I routine to me.  When honey is really coming  in, only what you can do is extract and arrange that hive has more free combs than full combs. To me that is not interesting at all.  But however it is interesting to find splended pastures. It is difficult. In my cottage yard fields are so well cultivated that there are very few nectar sources.
Logged
newbee101
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 290


Location: Bethel CT


WWW
« Reply #12 on: January 01, 2007, 04:40:28 AM »

Zoot, we have same problem here in CT.
Logged

"To bee or not to bee"
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #13 on: January 01, 2007, 09:48:20 AM »

Mick, again I say, keep on with the pictures, very nice to see, I love the beautiful white comb.

I heard that bees DO NOT WHATSOVER like the smell of sweat.  That is why in the hot sun they will sometimes attack a stinky beast, such as cattle or horses, goats probably too (I don't like the smell of a billy for sure).  Now don't get me wrong, I ABSOLUTELY LOVE the smell of horses,to me that is like a perfume, I used to stand beside my horses with my face laying against their neck and drink in their aroma, beautiful.  Oops, where I go again.

One writer who had a particularly beautifully written book said that he always kept a pail of cold water by his hive so that he could dunk his hands in it to close the pores so they did not sweat as much.  Now does that make sense or not? 

I am fortunate, I do not have an overly sweaty body or sweaty hands.  Now my bee pal whose bees I keep at my place is different.  I tell him that he should always shower before he comes to anything with the bees.  He does not come over very often, he is quite old and has a very hard time in the summer with the heat and losing breath.  So he helps a little bit, when he can, when the weather is cooler.

Last summer he came over just to have a look at the bees.  He had been working quite hard on his son's house.  This man is an amazing builder, pipefitter, everything that you could imagine he has done (as far as outside work and building).  He was very sweaty and had a strong odour.  We went up to have a look at the girls and what they were doing.  Well,  you wouldn't believe it if you didn't see it.  Several bees (we were probably at least 12 feet from the hives) came right after him.  I was astounded.  Of course this freaked  him out and he started swatting at them. Oops, more interest from the bees.  He quickly walked away as fast as he could, they turned around and went home.  Guess he was lucky that they didn't chase him farther.  So I can tell you first hand.....the bees don't like the musky smell of someone who is sweaty with sweat. 

It certainly cannot be helped one little bit when it is hot and working the bees, I just know that don't let the sweat build up and then work the bees, or just plain and simply, live with it. LOL.  Great 2007.  Great day.  Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Brian D. Bray
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 7369


Location: Anacortes, WA 98221

I really look like this, just ask Cindi.


WWW
« Reply #14 on: January 01, 2007, 03:23:04 PM »

I you ever read the Keeper of the Bees you know that the beekeeper in the story always crushed mint or other flowers on his hands before going into the hives.  I've tried it a few times when the bees were extra testy--seems to work.
Logged

Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
Trot
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 196

Location: Sudbury, Ontario, Canada


« Reply #15 on: January 01, 2007, 03:34:42 PM »

I was 12, back home, when first started keeping bees. We had no gloves, wails or smokers. Older keepers, of course, all smoked pipes. I used to roll up an old woolly rag and lite it.
For hand/face protection, we would have a basin of water handy, as Cindi mentioned. Only in that water we would pour a half-cup of cider vinegar. It worked good for us...

Regards,
Frank
Logged
Kirk-o
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1059


Location: Los Angeles california


« Reply #16 on: January 01, 2007, 06:56:19 PM »

I just try to take my tome smoke them correctly and go about my busines .If they become a hot hive I regueen or devide and conquer per Michael Bush sugested on his web page
kirko
Logged

"It's not about Honey it's not about Money It's about SURVIVAL" Charles Martin Simmon
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #17 on: January 01, 2007, 11:17:48 PM »

I you ever read the Keeper of the Bees you know that the beekeeper in the story always crushed mint or other flowers on his hands before going into the hives.  I've tried it a few times when the bees were extra testy--seems to work.
Brian, actually read several of the "Hive and the Honeybee, Spell of the Honeybee, ABC and XYZ of Bee Culture.  All very, very old editions that I have.  They all speak about the lemonbalm, everyone on the forum speaks of the lemongrass, seems they are one in the same.  I grow lemonbalm.  I also read that taking the leaves of the lemonbalm and rubbing them on the hands, right on the hive bodies, on the clothing calms the bees.  It probably makes them believe that they are in the midst of the beautiful aromas that come from these "lemon" essences. I have used the leaves of my lemonbalm rubbed on my hands.  I also made a tea to take with me into the yard.  I honestly don't know that I have felt any difference or not with the lemon scent.  I rarely have been stung on my hands.  Wrists yes, face (capturing a swarm) yes, that is about it.

In the depths of summertime I attend my bees with a veil and always a sleeveless tank top and blue jeans.  I am always working out in the dirt so I wear jeans almost all the time in summer, except when sitting by the poolside, enjoying the shade of our burgundy Beech tree.  It is not hot wearing jeans, as I am usually knee in the dirt stuff.

Hmm..where was I?  Oh ya, I rarely ever go into the bee yard without a veil of some sort.  I know how nosy bees can be.  I do not want any bees even landing on my face, that strikes terror in my heart.  Silly, but that does not matter.  If I am working with the bees, I want to feel 100% confident that I will not have some little lady delight in getting back at me for entering their domain.  Nope.  Not for me.  I never have, never do wear gloves.  A tip that I got from a fellow beekeeper at our club, told me one day when he was helping me to hive a swarm that ventured into my back acreage, to put on the baby powder.  If I am putting my hand deep within, I have a small bottle of baby powder that I sprinkle on my hands.  The bees actually like this stuff.  They land on my hands and I can tell that they are taking a really good whiff.  No idea what is in the baby stuff, but they do not ever sting me.  Perhaps bees know more than we give them.  Maybe they think that some kind of "baby" is around. LOL.  Now that was supposed to be funny.  I do know that (I think it was you Finsky) said we cannnot put the emotions of humans to bees.  But.....maybe we can...now that is food for some thought, come on.!!!!!  LOL.

For example, have you ever watched a foal and another older horse, other than its mother.  The little foal opens his mouth and kind of goes what I could only describe as "ya, ya, ya".  The older horse, no matter how many times I have seen this done, does not bother the little baby at all.  Nor do dogs. If there is ever a puppy that comes to our home (we have 6 adult dogs) (and we have many visitors with all the inhabitants that live on our property), not a single one of the older dogs bears any aggressive behaviour to that little baby.  They all love it to pieces and want to befriend it. 

Oops, got that long-winded thing going again.  I apologize, it just runs away with me and I can't stop it.  All have a great day.  Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Scott Derrick
Expert Bee Handler
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 35

Location: Blythewood, South Carolina

Go Gamecocks!!


WWW
« Reply #18 on: January 01, 2007, 11:57:22 PM »

My mentor told me that when I go into the hive without gloves, to take some lemongrass old and rub in on my hands prior to going into the hive. He said it would have a calming affect on them. I have been in my hives without gloves one time and I was nervous as anything. I am not that brave yet. A local pollinator wears shorts and a tee shirt and no veil when he works. He has told me that there are days that he gets "lit up" by his girls from time to time.

I'm just not that brave or comfortable yet.

Scott
Logged

My Bee Removal Photos: https://picasaweb.google.com/109455718186385256142
My Youtube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/rsderrick

"You're born. You suffer. You die. Fortunately, there's a loophole."
                                              Billy Graham
Finsky
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2791


Location: Finland


« Reply #19 on: January 02, 2007, 02:55:20 AM »

. I am not that brave yet.

I have worked with pale hands all the time. The best you can do it to get calm bee stock. Sweat filled cloves are a nuisance.

It is better to nurse 2 lazy hives than one good which is angry. When nectar is plenty on fields, lazy bees gather honey away as well as busy bees.
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 3  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.977 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page December 25, 2014, 09:41:16 AM