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Author Topic: Requeening frequency  (Read 2112 times)
ElDoBill
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« on: July 25, 2007, 03:38:14 PM »

I have read many places that requeening annually or bi-annually is necessary to prevent swarming yet I read posts here that seem contradict that advice. Is annual requeening necessary?  Which is the best season, fall or spring? 

Many thanks
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pdmattox
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« Reply #1 on: July 25, 2007, 06:46:33 PM »

Requeening does not gurantee that your hive will not swarm.  I like to requeen in the fall, I get a better deal on the prices then I do in the spring.  I would not think requeening yearly is something a backyard beekeeper should have to worry about.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #2 on: July 25, 2007, 09:35:39 PM »

>Is annual requeening necessary?

No.

> Which is the best season, fall or spring? 

Fall.  Or whenever she is failing.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
ElDoBill
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« Reply #3 on: July 26, 2007, 01:01:47 PM »

Thanks for the replies.  I'll not plan on requeening this fall since this is a colony that was established from a nuc late last May.  My first, hence the elementary questions. Mr. bush you mentioned that it's not necessary to requeen unless she is failing, what are the signs of that?   
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pdmattox
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« Reply #4 on: July 26, 2007, 04:47:29 PM »

well I'm not Mr. Bush but I will give my 2cents.  If you start seeing spotty brood patterns, a lot of drone cells or if the queen is present but eggs are lacking should be some signs.  Unless you get a bad queen, the first year she should not give you any problems.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #5 on: July 26, 2007, 08:56:48 PM »

Assuming no other cause (getting ready to swarm, honey bound brood nest, chilled brood etc.) a spotty brood pattern is generally the sign she is failing.  So are supersedure cells.  Many times I've seen supersedure cells and put them in a split only to have what was a really good laying queen quit laying altogether.  Obviously the bees saw it coming and I didn't.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
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Mici
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« Reply #6 on: July 27, 2007, 06:31:35 PM »

oh yeah..the last statement sure is true. they superceded her, i moved her to another hive (she was doing great) luckily she layed a few batches of eggs in the new hive so...today i saw at least 10 emergency cells but not her majesty, neither any eggs.
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kathyp
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« Reply #7 on: July 27, 2007, 08:06:28 PM »

if fall is the best time for re-queening, then i'm not totally whacked for knocking off my crappy queen yesterday?  i know it's not fall, but it will be that much closer when they are done re-queening themselves (if they do).
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Cindi
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« Reply #8 on: August 06, 2007, 11:24:36 AM »

Kathy, hah!!!  I get such a kick out of your comments.  I am going knock off a crappy queen too, but I am going to requeen with an already mated one, that gives me 30 days extra time for rearing brood for the wintertime.  I think it is worth the $22 that we pay for a mated queen.  Have a wonderful day, beautiful life.  Cindi
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mgmoore7
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« Reply #9 on: August 07, 2007, 12:10:33 PM »

In FL, they are now starting to encourage requeening at least yearly to ensure that your hive does not become Africanized unless you have a marked queen from a breeder and you continue to find the marked queen. 
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