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Author Topic: time to inspect  (Read 2213 times)
sean
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« on: December 29, 2006, 02:31:33 PM »

Hi, quick question. Is there for want of a better word "ideal" time of day to inspect your hives. i usually do mine in the mornings about 8am. is that a good time or would later be better. I hav paid dearly especially going down into the brood chambers to remove some frames and replace with empty frames.
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ChickenWing
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« Reply #1 on: December 29, 2006, 03:13:48 PM »

A bit later in the afternoon is usually better, because that is when most of the foragers are out in the field.  Then you are dealing with fewer bees at the hive site. 
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KONASDAD
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« Reply #2 on: December 29, 2006, 03:25:43 PM »

when the most bees are out and about foraging. Not at night. I looked inside one night, never again.
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kathyp
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« Reply #3 on: December 29, 2006, 03:43:22 PM »

when it's warm and later in the day!  as i read your post, i was scraping stingers out of my jeans.  i just broke every rule of checking a hive.....1. no smoker 2. cold weather 3. ripped off hat and veil because of bees inside 4. did not run fast enough 5. long hair not tucked under veil  6.  Garnier Fructis leave in hair conditioner.

on the bright side, i now know what to use to attract bees into a new hive!

with all of that, i did not get stung.  i lost track of how many stingers i pulled out of my clothes smiley
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Jorn Johanesson
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« Reply #4 on: December 29, 2006, 04:05:51 PM »

when the most bees are out and about foraging. Not at night. I looked inside one night, never again.

bees are red blind. Did you use a flash light with red glass smiley
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sean
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« Reply #5 on: December 29, 2006, 05:36:45 PM »

ok i will try later in the day. On a side note has anyone tried using driving gloves or gloves with the fingers cut off. I ask this because most of the stings i have rec'd have been on the back of my hand not on the fingers, and i was thinking of cutting the fingers off a pair of garden gloves that i have, so i would have more dexterity than with full gloves
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Understudy
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« Reply #6 on: December 29, 2006, 05:54:17 PM »

I will check mine in the morning provided it has warmed up enough for the bees to start leaving and go foraging.

The problem for me in the afternoon is when all the new bees are doing their orientation flight. So I will wait until that is done usually about 20 minuets.

Sincerely,
Brendhan
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sean
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« Reply #7 on: December 29, 2006, 06:58:07 PM »

when it's warm and later in the day!  as i read your post, i was scraping stingers out of my jeans.  i just broke every rule of checking a hive.....1. no smoker 2. cold weather 3. ripped off hat and veil because of bees inside 4. did not run fast enough 5. long hair not tucked under veil  6.  Garnier Fructis leave in hair conditioner.

on the bright side, i now know what to use to attract bees into a new hive!

with all of that, i did not get stung.  i lost track of how many stingers i pulled out of my clothes smiley

you are quite lucky. i may needto take you with me when i am going back in
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #8 on: December 29, 2006, 07:05:42 PM »

The more the bees are flying the better time it is to inspect.
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Michael Bush
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Cindi
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« Reply #9 on: December 30, 2006, 10:40:02 AM »

when the most bees are out and about foraging. Not at night. I looked inside one night, never again.

bees are red blind. Did you use a flash light with red glass smiley
Ha, Jorn, next time I go into the hive at night I will put on the red cover.  LOL.  Why would someone go into a hive at night?  All the bees are home, you are asking for trouble, the bees see well when it is dark.  If they saw a white flashlight beam coming into their home in the middle of their night, I bet they would be upset, probably would be blinding.  Great day.  Cindi
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Jorn Johanesson
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« Reply #10 on: December 30, 2006, 10:47:30 AM »

I have always moved bees at night. Of with cover, moving hardware on. Red orientation light. Quick work no problems. You saw my smily.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #11 on: December 30, 2006, 12:27:20 PM »

Bees don't see well at night and they cling and crawl and sting a lot when it's dark.  I have found myself finding queens in nucs in the dark on occasion but they do crawl a lot.
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Michael Bush
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Jorn Johanesson
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« Reply #12 on: December 30, 2006, 12:53:41 PM »

Bees don't see well at night and they cling and crawl and sting a lot when it's dark.  I have found myself finding queens in nucs in the dark on occasion but they do crawl a lot.


True they crawl and sting a lot, and have no or little orientation. But clear flashlight they go for, and because we need orientation, a red light is the answer. The bees does not recognise this area of the light spectrum. The stinging bees in daylight are the guard and field bees. But the other bees in hive are also able to sting. Even the queen can sting.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #13 on: December 30, 2006, 01:43:15 PM »

>But clear flashlight they go for

From my observation, you are correct.

> and because we need orientation, a red light is the answer. The bees does not recognise this area of the light spectrum.

Correct.
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Michael Bush
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sean
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« Reply #14 on: December 30, 2006, 04:00:22 PM »

A bit later in the afternoon is usually better, because that is when most of the foragers are out in the field.  Then you are dealing with fewer bees at the hive site. 

Ok. went in later and had no problems with stings. Found out that i had a wax moth problem in 1 colony. Have reduced it to 1 box  and imported 2 frames from other hives. will watch it for another 2 weeks. Have i not done anything?
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #15 on: December 30, 2006, 08:50:25 PM »

I was taught to go into the hives during the "heat of the day" when those bees that can are more apt to be out of the hive.  Foragers, orientations, drones, etc.  The less bees in the hive during manipulation the easier it is to assess the condition of the hive without having to move the bees by hand or smoker.
I like to go in between 1 and 3 pm.
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Cindi
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« Reply #16 on: January 01, 2007, 12:58:27 AM »

Hmmm.  A comment was made that bees do not see well at night.  How can that make sense?  They have the 3 ocelli on the head.  I was under the impression that these ocelli were their "night vision" eyes in their hive, in addition to their "day vision" larger eyes,  so they can see night or day within their home?

I need clarification on this as it has become confusing.  Great new year 2007, Cindi

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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Finsky
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« Reply #17 on: January 01, 2007, 01:15:25 AM »


If you really want to clear out what hives are angry, go to hives near sunset and you get the answer.

Bees cannot se in dim light where  human eye is still able to se.
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Cindi
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« Reply #18 on: January 01, 2007, 01:21:17 AM »

No, not getting it.  How can they see in the dark in their hive if they cannot see in "dim" light?Huh?
Great day.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Finsky
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« Reply #19 on: January 01, 2007, 01:30:01 AM »

How can they see in the dark in their hive

They don't se. They act according their sense of smell, with antennas and legs. Queen measures with legs, is it worker cell, then she put antennas inside and sniffs is the cell free to lay. If quen have lost her one antenna and front leg is violated, egg laying will not manage.

In the battle queen may get poison in her antenna or leg and they will be rigid.
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