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Poll

What primary configuration do you use for production hives?

10 fr body w/10 frames
24 (57.1%)
10 fr body w/9 frames
12 (28.6%)
8 fr body w/8 frames
6 (14.3%)
8 fr body w/7 frames
0 (0%)
Other
0 (0%)

Total Members Voted: 40

Voting closed: March 24, 2007, 01:04:30 AM

Author Topic: Hive configuration  (Read 4793 times)

Offline Scott Derrick

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Re: Hive configuration
« Reply #20 on: January 02, 2007, 01:38:32 AM »
Some of the 10 frame boxes that I bought have "8 frame spacers" in them. I believe the reason this guy used them like this was because it was easier to handle (lighter). I assume that I should take them out if I want to run the unlimited brood chamber method.

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Offline Michael Bush

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Re: Hive configuration
« Reply #21 on: January 02, 2007, 07:40:52 AM »
>"8 frame spacers" in them. I believe the reason this guy used them like this was because it was easier to handle (lighter).

But they won't be any lighter.  A ten frame super with 10 or 9 or 8 frames weighs about the same full.  The bees just make the combs thicker in the supers.
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Offline Brian D. Bray

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Re: Hive configuration
« Reply #22 on: January 03, 2007, 07:21:51 AM »
And using 8 frames in a 10 frame hive invites lots of cross comb.  Like with burr comb maintainence on such a configuration is a chore.
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Offline gottabee

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Re: Hive configuration
« Reply #23 on: January 03, 2007, 10:02:18 PM »
When I started buying new woodenware I knew the bees would respect a 3/8" space. I failed to realize that they will not necessairly build the space to suit me or where I think it should be. Today I know the value of consistant spacing whether running 8, 9, or 10 frames. Consistant spacing has been a benefit to me. My frames are not always drawn out perfectly but usually it is me who has been careless while installing a frame.

Offline Brian D. Bray

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Re: Hive configuration
« Reply #24 on: January 05, 2007, 02:20:43 AM »
The question has been addressed in other discussions within the forum. 
The fewer frames in a box the more likely you are to have problems with cross and burr comb.  Irregular comb also becomes an issue.  Frames will develop a trait of having 1/4 inch deep comb to having over 1 1/2 inches of comb on the same side.  They will look like waves when puller from the hives and viewed from the top.  Such comb irregularities will inhibit the queens ability to maintain a cohesive brood nest.  the irregularities also seem to cause a certain amount of stress which shows up in disease susceptable bees.
Any person who puts in less than the number of frames for which the box is designed for is asking for problems.  I strongly argue against such ideas.  But you're welcome to try it and find out for yourself.
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Offline Finsky

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Re: Hive configuration
« Reply #25 on: January 05, 2007, 07:01:33 AM »
And using 8 frames in a 10 frame hive invites lots of cross comb.  Like with burr comb maintainence on such a configuration is a chore.

I use 9 frames in 10 frame super.  I use in brood deeps 10/10.  8/10 frames spoil combs so much that I do not se any fun in it. When I exctract, combs are badly crushed in 8/10 box. It is not merely burr.

In brood are 9/10 system makes, that honey part is very thick and brood are somewhere there. No idea in that.

When you give foundation,they must be first 10/10.


Offline Cindi

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Re: Hive configuration
« Reply #26 on: January 05, 2007, 09:47:07 AM »
Good information.  Great day.  Cindi
There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service

Offline gottabee

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Re: Hive configuration
« Reply #27 on: January 18, 2007, 08:56:40 PM »
Looks like the vast majority are running 10 frame equipment.

Offline Finsky

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Re: Hive configuration
« Reply #28 on: January 19, 2007, 02:20:03 AM »
Looks like the vast majority are running 10 frame equipment.

I think that old standard prefared 9 frames and now 10 frames in Langstroth.  Old standard means 50 years ago?
That is why I have two size. I think that Finland use American Langstroth and medium standards.

First stryfoam deeps arrived from Denmark to Finland 20 years ago and they were for 10 frames.

Offline BEE C

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Re: Hive configuration
« Reply #29 on: January 19, 2007, 06:53:50 AM »
Scott, I worked for a commercial beekeeper this summer, and some of the hives were eight deep frames in a ten frame deep super.  Some of the hives had a plastic feeder frame left in eight or nine deep frames.  Heavy as hell.  Add that to being fully protected from bees or ventilation in a new beekeeping suit and a sunny day in the middle of acres of blueberry fields and anything that makes the lifting easier the better.  Too much room and there is the chance for weird burr comb, or frames that have extra deep combs, (wait, is that a bad thing...).  As far as I can gather bees don't really care how many frames, as long as the nest as a whole is keeps an appropriate beespace between combs?  Weight is the biggest inconvenience I can see with using deeps.  I bought ten frame deeps and my hives don't move. I extracted frames exactly like cindi did, and found it to bee relaxing and fun.  Running commercial hives on pollinating contracts means mostly working as fast as possible with not all that much time for each hive, using a air blower to clean bees off of frames, forklifting pallets of supers.  I enjoyed working for a commercial beekeeper, but I can see how labour intensive it is working deeps for eight hours a day... :shock:If you don't want to move your hives or stack them too high, then, deeps are great.  I had crazy brood explosion early spring, and had ten frame deep boxes six high.  Not something I ever want to try again.  I had to get a step ladder to remove the top super.  I will be making splits till the cows come home from now on.  I didn't have bear proof space to take frames and make splits this year, and so I kept the nest going till it was three deeps big.   :mrgreen:Rambling, rambling, my two bits...

Offline Cindi

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Re: Hive configuration
« Reply #30 on: January 19, 2007, 09:30:30 AM »
Steve, what else did you do when you worked for that commerical beekeeper?  Did you do any queen grafting or that kind of stuff or what it field work?  Curious.

I am taking the Beemasters Short Course at SFU come the end of February.  It is one week long, for a full day each day.  A beemasters certificate is offered at the end of the course if you take the exam and pass.  I am going to take the exam just for fun.  Just to see if I can bring back the ability to bring knowledge taught actually write an exam.  Should be fun.  I know that you have a deep interest in the bee.  Too bad you couldn't go to it too.  You would benefit from this course, as I know that I will too, seeing that you have had experience with bees for a season.

Ron actually taught some classes at this course when it was offered some years ago.  He recommends it to individuals that have had some hands on experience with the bees.

This year I am thinking about getting some shallow supers for honey harvest.  Only a trial.  Like you said Steve, it was very enjoyable and relaxing to use the method that we used for removing the frames of honey from the hives.  I find when I work with the bees, I don't want to hurry, time stands still when I am in the apiary.  And that is not one little bit of an exageration.  I cannot believe how much time I spend in their in the real world, when I think that I have only been present in their for a few minutes.  Great day.  Cindi
There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service

Offline biodlare

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Re: Hive configuration
« Reply #31 on: January 19, 2007, 06:36:41 PM »
Eight frame equipment was the standard prior to the 10 frame size in USA and was especially used in the production of section comb honey. 10-frame size eventually became most popular as it gave more room for the brood nest (thought to lessen swarming) and was less apt to tip over when supered up; also, section honey became less popular and the major trend was toward extracting.