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Author Topic: seed catalogs  (Read 1741 times)
organicgrl37
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« on: December 22, 2006, 10:39:47 PM »


Joy of joys, my seed catalogs have been arriving in the mail. Does anyone else out there just love to bore over them as much as I do? My mom,sister and I have been already laying out plans. I find this to be almost as much fun as our little garden. I am wanting to create a nice Pick your own flower garden in the front yard. Our veggie garden will have to be moved from last years spot as the neighbors pine tree has gotten too big and now shades our usual place for much of the day. I think that is why we had weak plants and a low yeild last year. Even after our organic compost and earth wrom castings.  Undecided
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mick
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« Reply #1 on: December 23, 2006, 07:27:36 PM »

This is one of our better seed companies, specialising in heirloom varieties.

http://www.diggers.com.au/
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Cindi
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« Reply #2 on: December 26, 2006, 02:29:48 PM »

organicgrl37
Oh, ya, the seed catalogues, mine have been pouring in too, have not had too much chance to browse, but after the 31 of December, I get going.  We have a heated greenhouse and lights for growing those seedlings that require the higher light conditions. 

I ran a small nursery business for about 12 years, and propogated many, many plants.  I gave up the business after finding it becoming too much work, not FUN anymore.  The large companies, like Home Depot and Revy sold their hideous little plants so cheaply, the devoted clients that I had for so many years, started to head there, cause they could save a few cents.  Too bad, cause my plants surpassed in strength and beauty, long long past anything that could be bought at a hardware store.  Like, would you ever go to a hardware store to buy your cereal.  LOL.  Anyways, I achieved knowledge, and I still grow all my own plants, from vegies to annuals to perennials myself.  I always look at the nurseries to see if they have anything that I might want to buy, but there product is so inferior to what I can grow myself with TLC, I cannot bring myself to even entertain the thought of they ugly plants.  Not to brag, but I grow beautiful plants.  Fairly good knowledge I have attained. 
Two that I focus on every year in January are the tuberous rooted begonias.  Lovely, but they take several months to mature enough to form a bulb to plant in the ground.  One that is particularly beautiful that I get seed from (Stokes) is so tiny that you can barely seed the seed, but in a couple of weeks in a moist medium the little tiny green flecks begin to appear.  This plant is a trailing begonia in shades of appricot, oranges and yellows.   The cultivar is "Illumination" and man is it a beauty.  it can stand alone in a pot for hanging, has so many beautiful double flowers (and the single ones on it too) that it does not even need any accent.  although I always put a little of the pretty Creeping Jenny (lysimachia) that grows wild around our place for green trailing prettiness.  It has the pretty yellow flower that combines beautifully with the trailing begonia.

My sister and I too, like you, do it together, pour over the catalogues, make our lists and send it off.  We order so much that I still get a 5% discount from Stokes.  I like their seed, am always impressed and never ever disappointed.  There are smaller companies that I order seeds, like heirloom varieties from.  I love the heirloom and you know that they have not been genetically engineered, altered and are true to their parent.  Don't get me wrong, I still love the hybrids, be them F1, F2 or whatever, they have their good points too.

Heliotrope (Marine) is one of my favourites for growing for that summertime super fragrance, along with Matthiola Bicornis (evening scented stock) for the night fragrance that almost knocks your socks off when you walk by a patch.  Oh the summertime, it is coming soon.

You have an awesome time with your seed catalouges, if you think of anything that really sticks out in your mind that I might love too, let me know.  I love to try new plants.  Great day girl.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
organicgrl37
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« Reply #3 on: December 26, 2006, 09:01:39 PM »

Cyndi-It was great to hear of your experiences working in green houses and such. I did a short stint at Brigham Farm and Greenhouses in Concord, MA myself. It was my first palnt experience as I had always work with the livestock up until then. I loved being in the greenhouse doing transplants in january and febuary. I found that I am allergic to geraniums when I passed out in the greenhouse after pinching back about 500 plants. I was rushed to the local hospital and had to have a couple of allergy shots. The guy who kept up the green house would get made at me whenever I would refer to his soil mixture as dirt...ha ha! The owner of the farm and greenhouses I worked for used chemicals and it kind of freaked me out. He sprayed all the crops and bombed the houses on a regular bases. I never applied the chemicals myself but I was around them. YUCK! I learned that I really do prefer to work for organic farmers. I started my farming experience that way and the last farm I worked on was organic.

I hate to say it, but I am not a fan of the tuberous begonias. I am much more of a cut flower kind of gal. Mums, tulips, asters, cosmos...and the simple yet lovely marigold. If and when Darryl and I have our wedding I want to carry marigolds and mums in orange, red and yellow. I want marigolds strung everywhere like an indian wedding. Silly, Darryl and I aren't even engaged yet and I have our wedding planned. Well we have been together for over 9 years and have a little boy of 22 months.ooops have to run baby is crying.
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Cindi
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« Reply #4 on: December 26, 2006, 09:21:02 PM »

organicgrl37. Oh yes, the babies....when they give a call, it must be attended to right away, it has been a long time since I have had babes in arms.  But those were the days.  Now, when you get old enough to have the grandchildren...then life really begins.  There is nothing on earth more wonderful than the grandchildren, if you thought your own children were fabulous.  Tend your child, love your child, in the end you will reap what you sow, and your child will love you.

About the cut flowers.  I love them too.  I like the begonias for the semi shady gardens that I have.  They become so full and beautiful, my begonia gardens are always in deep red and white, the contrast is beauty to the eyes.

Look into the cut flowers, there are so many many varieties that can be grown with ease.  One of my all time favourites for the vase are snapdragons.  Always grow the mid-size, wind tolerant series that Stokes sells, I don't like the tall snapdragons they fall over.  They are absolutely stunning.  If a drop of bleach is put into the vase water with snapdragons, they last for a long, long time.  Cosmos comes in so many pretty colours, such airy beauties.  A beautiful one for cut flower is one called Cleome.  Can't pass that for strength in a vase.  All Gaillardias are nice too, any of the cornflower (bachelors buttons), anything that has a daisy resemblence are excellent, and many of the 'everlastings' are great for the vase, even the vase that is devoid of water.  Have fun with your seeds, catalogues and growing these on.  Great day, girl.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
mick
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« Reply #5 on: December 26, 2006, 09:26:51 PM »

I was on the natural resources crew in one of my previous lives, loved it, but pay is lousy. Did a heap of propagating, absolutely loved it!

Cindi, we have the Ballarat Begonia festival here every year, thousands of em, all different sorts.
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organicgrl37
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« Reply #6 on: December 26, 2006, 10:01:34 PM »

cindi- have you ever heard of thomas morgan company. we have their seed catalog. lots of hybrids:( my mom wants to try them for parts of the cut flower garden we are planning. the garden will have so far; snap dragons, cosmos, dahlias, sunflower,cleomes, yarrow, echinacea, scabious, sweet peas, zinnia, salvia, african daisies, asters,cirsium, globe thistle, freesia, and others....

maybe we should narrow down the list?! I hope to also plant morning glories and moon flowers outside the front door. I am building a nice trellis for them to climb. . There is laurence again. I think he may have an ear ache.
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Cindi
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« Reply #7 on: December 26, 2006, 10:04:32 PM »

Mick, that Ballarat Begonia festival would be a sight for sore eyes.  Wish I could see it.  Great day. Cindi

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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Cindi
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« Reply #8 on: December 26, 2006, 10:13:04 PM »

cindi- have you ever heard of thomas morgan company. we have their seed catalog. lots of hybrids:( my mom wants to try them for parts of the cut flower garden we are planning. the garden will have so far; snap dragons, cosmos, dahlias, sunflower,cleomes, yarrow, echinacea, scabious, sweet peas, zinnia, salvia, african daisies, asters,cirsium, globe thistle, freesia, and others....

maybe we should narrow down the list?! I hope to also plant morning glories and moon flowers outside the front door. I am building a nice trellis for them to climb. . There is laurence again. I think he may have an ear ache.

organicgrl37.  Yup, I have actually ordered product from Thomas Morgan Company.  I try to keep to Canada though because it is much cheaper than worrying about duty etc.
You will be surprised what you can fit into garden spots, try to remember the height factor when planting. Sometimes that happens with me and some tiny little plant gets stuck somewhere where some giant sized plants overshadows and squishes it (LOL).  The African daisies are also known as Gerbera also as Transvaal Daisy, I think).  If you plant these, they like it really warm, lots of sun, but at the same time like to be kept quite moist.  I mistake I made with these beauties one year.

What a reaction you had to geraniums. When I used to prune them, I could not stand how they turned my fingers and hands orange, very pretty, but rather annoying for sure.

If you order cleomes, try the one that looks like darkest pink, it is very pretty, I found that the light pink one was too light coloured for my liking.  If you see a plant called Lavatera, don't order white, the flowers are not very significant, get the one that is called "Ruby Regis" "Silver Cup" is pretty too, but it is a light pink, Ruby is a great dark pink with pretty darker veins in the flower petals, it is a beautiful cut flower.  Self-seeds like crazy, so once you have it, you have it forever more.  Have a great day, girl.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
organicgrl37
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« Reply #9 on: December 27, 2006, 12:41:29 PM »

thanks for the advice cindi, i will keep it in mind when placing our orders. We have been loking at the Seeds of Change catalog for some veggie seeds. We mostly buy plants from a local organic farmer here in Ohio. I worked for them a couple of seasons when I first moved here. i run out there often to get my farm fix when the city is driving me crazy.
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #10 on: December 27, 2006, 09:34:34 PM »

I just got a Stark Nursery Catalog.  I'm looking to plant a few fruit trees and berry bushes.  I have 5 apple trees (5 varieties) and 1 Anjou pear tree.  Cherries and another pear tree and a couple of hazelnut bushes plus blueberries, gooseberries, strawberries, currants, and raspberries.  Since I have the space I want to make the property as self sufficient as possible.  With an orchard, a garden, a berry patch, apiary, chickens, and goats I can come pretty close on 1.2 acres.
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Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
Cindi
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« Reply #11 on: December 27, 2006, 09:55:05 PM »

Brian, it sounds like you have a'plenty on your land.  That is good.  I admire people that take the time to grow their own food, be it meats, fruits or vegetables.  There is nothing on this earth that can compare to the pride that one feels when they consume produce that they have raised with their very own hands.  You have a great variety of fruit.  I have never grown gooseberries, but as a child I can remember my girlfriend's mother had the bushes.  The berries never ceased to amaze me then and still do now.  I don't know why, some kind of allure for the fruit to me.  One day I may venture into having a few gooseberry.   Wonder why they are called gooseberry anyways.  Maybe the geese in particular enjoy this squishy squashy berry.

If you get a chance and want to see a cool plant, plant tomatillos, or their cousin, the Cape GooseberryZ(aka ground cherry), they are very pretty, you may have seen them, sprawling, covered like crazy with the typical yellow flowers, the beneficials love the thousands of flowers on a single plant.  Just something to grow if you like to grow.

I need to plant a couple of more apple trees.  My dumb little pitty last summer chewed off a bunch of branches off a three year old tree.  The kids thought it was great great fun to pull the slender branches down to see if he could jump high enough to grab a few.  Needless to say, pitties can jump like the demon from the darker side.  He chewed the branches, then began on the trunk of the tree.  The damage was done, I didn't even know it until the next day when I saw this poor old beshambled tree.  The kids got trouble, the dog none, it was not the pup's fault.  The boys had the fear put in them that day, (of course it was two of the youngest boys just having fun with the pup).  Yikes!!! Kids and their dogs.  I could just picture all the other dogs watching on and shaking their heads, thinking, boy is he gonna get it.  Off topic, sorry, I seem to do that alot.

I have now only one tree inside the fenced part of my yard, I want two, so another I shall buy.  I like the winter apples so I am heading off to find a Gavenstien (spelling). 

Brian, do you know what type of apples yours are?  Are they good?  Any recommendations?  Great day.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #12 on: December 28, 2006, 09:19:31 PM »

I've got a Red Delicious and 2 Gravenstien for sure.  What the other 2 are I'm not sure, the trees were planted during WWII so I've had to do some heavy pruning to save the main tree in a couple of cases.  The Mid-December windstorm took down a Mountain ash tree that, as we found out, was rotten to the core.  I plan on planting the new stuff and then look at replacing some of the old trees later.  I plan on going semi-dwarf on all future trees.
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Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
Cindi
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« Reply #13 on: December 28, 2006, 10:24:51 PM »

My sister in a neighbouring town grows Spartans, now they are a very nice late season apple.  Gravenstien, of course, I forgot the "r".  This sister of mine I sometimes think if out of her head.  She has a 3 acre land parcel, she farms, she raises horses and raises fruit, mostly the Anjou pear,  Bartlette pear, and several cultivars of apple, she has several beautiful walnut trees too.  Now that walnut tree is a story that I will talk about another time, because it is long and may be tedious to some, but to me it was an adventure that I entered into, stayed within for a long time, only to lose in the end.  Oh brother....maybe I will get into it, in another post.  Oops, here I go again, off topic. 

She has about 18 fruit trees in total.  Her springtime fun is the pruning that goes on with these trees.  Yikes!!  Like I said, I think that she is out of her mind and should turn some back to earth, she does not sell any fruit, but we all benefit from her time spent in her orchard.  Too much time in my eyes to spend on cutting back trees.

Brian, I think that semi-dwarf sounds like a good plan, without pruning, some trees can really grow far too fast for comfort.  For example we have a cherry tree that I did not prune for 2 years, and this past spring, it was so tall, that we had to use an extension ladder to get the cherries.  Oooh.  That was a toughy.  The year before that the blasted bald-faced hornets had made an enormous hive in the tree, nearer to the top, so that year was a right off. I almost got it by several of these demons, I was too close, did not see it, but heard them.  They were angry and I surely knew it.  I managed to climb back down the tree before any set fall their pain on my body.  They are very noisy and when you come to close, man do you know it.  My husband saw one coming at him one year, and it made a direct hit right on the chest, it was gonna get hiim no matter what.  These are really big buggers and you don't want to mess with them. Great day. Cindi

Great day. Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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