Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
July 22, 2014, 09:16:40 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: 24/7 Ventrilo Voice chat -click for instructions and free software here
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat(2)  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: pictures of frames from my dead hive  (Read 2283 times)
randydrivesabus
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1072

Location: Indian Valley, VA


« on: December 28, 2006, 02:53:24 PM »








the rest of the frames are either drawn out but empty or not drawn out at all.
i guess i can just get a new package in the spring with a new queen and dump them in.
this was taken with my phone so they may not be the greatest pictures.

the hive that didnt die is very active today Smiley
Logged
Kirk-o
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1059


Location: Los Angeles california


« Reply #1 on: December 28, 2006, 10:28:04 PM »

Hey If you don't know why they died replace the used combs could have sickness on them maybe mites
kirko
Logged

"It's not about Honey it's not about Money It's about SURVIVAL" Charles Martin Simmon
Brian D. Bray
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 7369


Location: Anacortes, WA 98221

I really look like this, just ask Cindi.


WWW
« Reply #2 on: December 28, 2006, 10:37:55 PM »

Seems to me a lot could be learned from popping the cap on one of those drone cells still evident hither and yon.  If the pupae is formed in shape, but whole, there should not be a big problem.  Icky, squishy though is throw it out.
Logged

Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #3 on: December 29, 2006, 12:05:24 AM »

Randy, I would be curious why the combs look so strange with the holes in them, the comb is so deep in some parts and the other parts are very shallow.  I have not seen comb like this.  I have not been in the bee scene for an overly long time and maybe that is why I have not seen comb such as your.   the comb that I see in my hives is completely different than what I see in your picture. 

Can someone tell me if this is what natural comb looks like?  I have not seen it before.  This is not meant to be offensive to you, I hope it does not come across this way, I am just a curious person.  Great day.  Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Finsky
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2791


Location: Finland


« Reply #4 on: December 29, 2006, 12:12:55 AM »


Seems to me that those are drone pupae and hive have had unmated queen. The workers just finished.
Logged
AndersMNelson
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 117


Location: Newport News, VA

HEY


« Reply #5 on: December 29, 2006, 02:02:43 AM »

This brings up a question I had.  If when you move a hive and the bees end up not accepting the new location and die, can you just dump a new package into the hive?  Do you need to worry about the brood and such?
Logged

My Photos!

Takin' care of beesnus.
Finsky
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2791


Location: Finland


« Reply #6 on: December 29, 2006, 03:39:52 AM »

It depends how much brood has been without bees and how much they have chilled.

If brood are dead in combs it is not good to put new bees on dirty combs.  Take clean combs, restrict the room with medievall wall that bees occupy all rest frames. That starts well.
Logged
Scadsobees
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3198


Location: Jenison, MI

Best use of smileys in a post award.


« Reply #7 on: December 29, 2006, 07:35:27 AM »

Yes, that is natural comb.

Any background on that dead hive?  Was there a cluster that you cleaned out already?

Definately cut out the funky comb so that they can hopefully draw it out better next time.

-rick
Logged

Rick
randydrivesabus
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1072

Location: Indian Valley, VA


« Reply #8 on: December 29, 2006, 07:35:57 AM »

the frame in the top 2 pictures kind of came apart....one or 2 of the wires is just hanging loose at the bottom(the 2 pictures are the same frame from one side then the other). i will check out some of the drone cells later today.
a little hive history.....this was my strong hive and i moved a couple of frames of brood to the other hive back in the late spring (i see the value of keeping records now). i also added a second deep to this hive way before i did to the other because this hive was busting with bees. but something must have happened to the queen and i saw that the population in this hive was dwindling. this was already in late summer when i noticed this. meanwhile the other hive was just loaded with bees and they stung me a lot one hot morning in July when i was poking around their hive. so i kind of shied away from my bees for a while and it was during this time when the now dead hive probably could have used some help....like a new queen.
Logged
Trot
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 196

Location: Sudbury, Ontario, Canada


« Reply #9 on: December 29, 2006, 10:50:17 AM »

Sorry for jumping in...  A lot could be said if one would be able to see and experience when all this was taking place. 
All that I can see on this pictures is empty and even chewed up combs, with some pollen. IMO the bees most likely starved...
It is the strongest colonies that need a hand in need, cause they consume the most.

Now, you as a keep should know best what went on.  If queen was a dud? Perhaps..?
Than bees joined, (what was left of them) the other hive and robbers did the number on the combs?

Hard to tel with limited info... Just guessing, at best...

Regards,
Trot

Logged
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #10 on: December 29, 2006, 11:15:14 AM »

Yes, that is natural comb.
Any background on that dead hive?  Was there a cluster that you cleaned out already?
Definately cut out the funky comb so that they can hopefully draw it out better next time.
-rick

Rick, that funky comb?  That is natural?  I actually heard someone talking about "funny" comb.  I presume they were talking about the same type of comb, built strangely, but any ideas why they would build comb that is raised above the foundation.  It looks like the bees could actually climb below this comb that is on the face of the foundation.  What is on the bottom of the comb that is between the foundation and base of the comb.  I don't know if that makes any sense what I said, but it did in my own eyes.  Would the bees cap the bottom of the cell and the top of the cell.  Gotta understand what is going on here.  Great day. Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
randydrivesabus
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1072

Location: Indian Valley, VA


« Reply #11 on: December 29, 2006, 12:56:28 PM »

if i can get my field plowed today i'll go take some better pics but so far its going slow....broke a shear bolt and had to go to the hardware store so i lost an hour. and now i got hungry.....
Logged
Scadsobees
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3198


Location: Jenison, MI

Best use of smileys in a post award.


« Reply #12 on: December 29, 2006, 01:24:23 PM »

my $.02...

I'm with Finsky on this one...went queenless and then a poorly mated queen or laying workers, not resolved which explains the drone brood/comb.  Dwindled to very little, and any left over honey stores were robbed out by the other colony.  The last bit of drone brood didn't hatch out in time, and chilled and died.

I thought at first that you were using foundationless frames/starter strips, but now I see what looks like vertical foundation wires.  I consider any comb that the bees create left to their own devices to be natural. And they can make some weird comb.  If they have a box full of regular worker comb and then they create their own comb, it will usually be drone comb.  And that looks like what they did.

Cindi, why the second layer of comb?  They might have had a little too much space between and thought they could fit an extra comb in between.  That is one of the reasons why we are told to scrunch all of the new frames togather until they are all drawn out, then we can space them.  I don't know if that is why this time.  I had a little where my duragilt was down to plastic, they didnt' like that so they just did what they wanted.  In my case (only a palm size piece of comb) there wasn't anything behind.

-rick
Logged

Rick
Understudy
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 4640


Location: West Palm Beach, Fl


WWW
« Reply #13 on: December 29, 2006, 05:59:51 PM »

I saw no honey stores or at least no capped honey stores. I think they may have starved.
I did not see a lot of brood cells. That may be a queen issue. It may be a combination of both.

The funky comb didn't bother me sometimes the bees just do that.

Sincerely,
Brendhan
Logged

The status is not quo. The world is a mess and I just need to rule it. Dr. Horrible
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #14 on: December 30, 2006, 09:14:30 AM »

Rick,
<That is one of the reasons why we are told to scrunch all of the new frames togather until they are all drawn out, then we can space them.
So, for instance, in a 10 frame Langstroth deep, for a honey super, I understand 9 frames is best because the bees draw it deeper, more honey per frame, and easier to uncap.  In this instance, push the 9 frames close together, then as comb is drawn, space equally?  Is this the jist?  Sounds proper for surely.  Correct me if I get wrong impression.  Great day.  Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13563


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #15 on: December 30, 2006, 12:37:39 PM »

I always crowd ten frames in a ten frame box into the center tightly until they are drawn.  Then, in the supers you can space them out.  In the brood chambers I don't.  In fact I shave a bit off the end bars and put eleven frames in a ten frame box, or in my case, nine frames in an eight frame box.

Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
randydrivesabus
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1072

Location: Indian Valley, VA


« Reply #16 on: December 30, 2006, 05:29:55 PM »

i opened up some of the capped drone cells and the occupants were just dead bees. the frames have some pollen in them.
Logged
Brian D. Bray
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 7369


Location: Anacortes, WA 98221

I really look like this, just ask Cindi.


WWW
« Reply #17 on: December 30, 2006, 09:01:10 PM »

In the brood chambers the combs should always be crowded together.  In the supers it might not be as important but it is still a practice I use.  What can't be uncapped with a knife can be with a fork.  Deeper combs doe not necessarily mean more honey per super.  Spacing the frames can be a inducive to burr comb etc as removing frames from 10 to 9 or 8.
Logged

Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
thegolfpsycho
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 583

Location: canyon rim, ut


« Reply #18 on: December 30, 2006, 09:19:36 PM »

No.  Put in 10 frames.  After they are drawn, you can remove one and adust the spacing.  If you put 9 frames of foundation pushed together in a 10 frame box, you will get wild comb in the open space at the end or ends.  Bees prefer to make their own and will do so every chance they have.
Logged
Cindi
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 9827

Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #19 on: January 01, 2007, 01:19:25 AM »

OK, good advice.  I have always had 10 frames in brood and honey boxes, but read that 9 in honey super might be better.  Yup, do not want that burr comb beyond what the bees already do, nor wild comb either.  10 frames it shall be.

It would seem that it would be rather too much work anyways if one was to allow the bees to draw the 10 frames and then remove one to have 9 to make them draw comb out deeper.  Not going there for sure.

This is what is great about this forum, the advice flows, and then decisions can be made.  It is such a good thing and again and again, thank you all for the advice that we all welcome.  Great 2007.  Cindi
Logged

There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.26 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page June 15, 2014, 02:47:45 AM
anything