Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
July 23, 2014, 04:16:20 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Beemaster's official FACEBOOK page
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Removal call turned out to be Southern Yellowjackets - Any advice for these guy?  (Read 250 times)
GDRankin
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 49


Location: San Antonio, Tx area


WWW
« on: July 20, 2014, 01:48:52 PM »

I've ID'd these as follows (but may be wrong?):
Family Vespidae - Yellowjackets and Hornets, Paper Wasps; Potter, Mason and Pollen Wasps
Subfamily Vespinae - Hornets and Yellowjackets
Genus Vespula
Species squamosa - Southern Yellowjacket

They are fairly aggressive and have managed to upset the customer on several occasions, one sending him to the ER. They reside in a drain system that takes their nesting area underground and out of sight. I was called because they assumed they were honey bees. Obviously they are not, but need to be removed all the same.

I've dealt with plenty of the paper wasp (also called "Yellowjackets" around here), and removed many honey bee colonies, but this is my first encounter with these ground dwelling hot tempered rascals.

The customer obviously wants them gone and don't really care how that happens. I am not in the habit of killing anything, but this may become an exception if there's no reasonable alternative.

I thought of maybe attempting a trap out cage of some sort, not like the traditionally bee trap-out, but more like a crab trap, mainly to simply get them out and gone. But I have no idea how long that may take since I don't have a clue about the life cycle of these girls. Not to mention, if they live underground, chances are they are diggers and may figure out an escape from a trap - even if I were able to get it sealed up around their entrance area somehow. (was thinking of a 1/8 hardware cloth box with cement / mortar around the base.)

However, plan B may be to use a fogger type pesticide to get the ones that are inside the cavity. But then how often will this process need to be repeated as hatch-lings emerge?

Any one with experience with these guys have any suggestions?
Thanks in advance,
GD


Logged

Life is but a candle, a dream must give it flame.
divemaster1963
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 566


Location: Gray, Ga. USA.

God Protect and watch over our sons and daughters.


« Reply #1 on: July 20, 2014, 01:59:27 PM »

With the potential effects from stings sending the customer to the er disposal of the hive is the only way . the best way to kill the entire hive and easiest is to get a fogger and a bucket. Wait till dusk and just after the last wasp goes end and its dark set the fogger off and shove nozel into hole and seal entrance let stay all night they should bee all dead the next day. Be sure to ware you bee jacket with hood. Wasp sting repeatedly.


John
Logged
jaseemtp
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 324


Location: Weatherford Texas USA


« Reply #2 on: July 21, 2014, 01:02:04 AM »

GDR,
If you are not an exterminator bee careful as it is against the law for us to kill insects for profit if we are not properly licensed in the great state of Texas.  They need to contact an exterminator, that would be the safest for all parties involved.
Logged

"It's better to die upon your feet than to live upon your knees!" Zapata
GDRankin
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 49


Location: San Antonio, Tx area


WWW
« Reply #3 on: July 21, 2014, 03:17:25 AM »

Thanks for the info guys.

Yeah John, they were after me before I ever got close when I approached the entry hole. The customer got nailed once and I had one bump me in the hand, but somehow missed getting a stinger in me before I batted it to the ground. The sun was just going down, so the lighting was not all that good. At that point I hadn't realized yet they were not honey bees, so I just assumed they were AHB and went for my full suit and smoker. It wasn't until I returned to the entry hole that I realized they were wasps and needed to come up with a new plan for these foul tempered buggaz!

Understood  jaseemtp ... That makes sense.
Thanks again,
GD

Logged

Life is but a candle, a dream must give it flame.
Better.to.Bee.than.not
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 459

Location: S-E Michigan


« Reply #4 on: July 21, 2014, 05:08:43 AM »

with them, correct me if I am wrong (I only think this, do not know it.) you do not actually even need to remove the nest/etc, correct? unlike with honey bees you do not want the honey and the mess and the hive/etc in there, with yellow jackets it isn't such a big deal is it, so you can merely seal up the hole, and be done with it as soon as you fog and kill them right? unless you want to charge the owner for a full removal, and work that goes along with it of course and go through the extra trouble that is. (A real professional will probably at this point call me lazy, and I wouldn't argue, but still my line of thinking.)

Logged
Intheswamp
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1355

Location: South Central Alabama - Zone 8A


WWW
« Reply #5 on: July 21, 2014, 11:19:29 AM »

That is a rough, uneven area to try to seal with a rigid container.  You might try placing some plastic sheeting carefully over the area, holding it down with rocks, etc. Shove a fogger or two into the entrance and one or two simply in the confines of the covered area and then pull the plastic on down and hold down with heavy objects.

Be sure there are no other entryways.  Doing it at night will keep the yj from flying so much *but* they will still come out!...be prepared!!!

Just some thoughts,
Ed
Logged

www.beeweather.com 
American blood spilled to protect the freedom and peace of people all over the world.  320,000 USA casualties in WWI, 1,076,000 USA casualties in WWII, 128,000 USA casualties in the Korean War, 211,000 casualties in the Vietnam "conflict", 57,000 USA casualties in "War on Terror".  Benghazi, Libya, 13 USA casualties. These figures don't include 70,000 MIA.  But, the leaders of one political party of the United States of America continue to make the statement..."What difference does it make?".

"We can't expect the American People to jump from Capitalism to Communism, but we can assist their elected leaders in giving them small doses of Socialism, until they awaken one day to find that they have Communism."..."The press is our chief ideological weapon." - Nikita Khrushchev
GDRankin
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 49


Location: San Antonio, Tx area


WWW
« Reply #6 on: July 21, 2014, 12:27:34 PM »

Yeah ... Better.to.Bee, I'm not too sure about that part either (re: needing to remove anything)
My guess is that if the adults are removed / destroyed, then depending on the method used, what ever larva are left behind may hatch and become a problem in a short time.

Yeah Ed, that ground is really uneven there and will likely need to be sealed up with plastic sheeting and/or a good tarp perhaps. I'm thinking that using sand bags to press down the plastic may be a way to help close off any possible exits.

Since the state has rules on exterminating these guys, I've got a call in to a local pest control guy that may be willing to help.

Thanks again for the input guys,
GD
Logged

Life is but a candle, a dream must give it flame.
tireman
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 39

Location: LOUISVILLE MS


« Reply #7 on: July 21, 2014, 09:56:13 PM »

Not to hijack thread but I have the same situation but with hornets in a wall. They have almost eaten all the way through the Sheetrock on the inside I'd the house. It belongs to my friends mother and so far they haven't found anyone willing to deal with them. I don't know what would kill them in a wall space so I have been thinking about using a modified bee vac, cut a hold in the wall and use their hostile nature against them? Any thoughts other than be sure to video it?
Logged

It is what it is
tireman
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 39

Location: LOUISVILLE MS


« Reply #8 on: July 21, 2014, 10:15:19 PM »

Could you flood it out with the water hose?
Logged

It is what it is
GDRankin
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 49


Location: San Antonio, Tx area


WWW
« Reply #9 on: July 22, 2014, 12:58:14 AM »

Could you flood it out with the water hose?
I don't think so . . . it appeared that they were on the side of the drain pipe, but since the pipe is burried, it's really hard to tell. However, I would think that the recent rains we had down here would have disrupted their nesting area if it were subject to water damage from the actual drain function. Will have to look into that more.

Not to hijack thread but I have the same situation but with hornets in a wall. They have almost eaten all the way through the Sheetrock on the inside I'd the house. It belongs to my friends mother and so far they haven't found anyone willing to deal with them. I don't know what would kill them in a wall space so I have been thinking about using a modified bee vac, cut a hold in the wall and use their hostile nature against them? Any thoughts other than be sure to video it?

No problem. I heard the guys talking about using a modified bee vac on some hornets or it may have even been these same yellow jackets (or both). They had some way of allowing the wasps to get sucked all the way into the propellers or turbo or what ever is inside the vac and basically chopped them to bits ... if I recall correctly.
That may work for your wall nest?
Logged

Life is but a candle, a dream must give it flame.
RC
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 236

Location: Perry, Fl


« Reply #10 on: July 22, 2014, 08:42:51 PM »

Be careful with those. They will kill you or make you kill yourself trying to get away from them. I would drop a couple of sticks of dynamite in the hole with them.
Yellow Jackets made me abandon a tractor years ago and I couldn't go around that thing for a week. They are nasty.
Logged
kathyp
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 15026


Location: boring, oregon


« Reply #11 on: July 22, 2014, 10:15:33 PM »

i get a lot of yellowjacket calls from now until first frost.  i don't do them.  they are better handles by an exterminator who will not only have the right stuff and equipment, but will guarantee the work AND be bonded so that if the owner drops dead from the one they missed, they are not left destitute....as you might be... Wink
Logged

.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.304 seconds with 23 queries.

Google visited last this page July 22, 2014, 04:01:41 PM