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Author Topic: A little more ventilation  (Read 1082 times)
Greg Peck
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« on: December 22, 2006, 04:02:42 PM »

I needed a little more ventilation in the hive and since there are mixed feelings about screened bottom boards in winter I decided to just add some ventilation to the solid bottom board. Here are some pics let me know if you think it is a good idea or not. I just drilled 4 1 inch holes in the BB and placed some hardware mesh over them. I also cut a little notch in the top of the hive body to add some ventilation. I will check them again next chance I get to see if the moisture problem is resolved.







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Michael Bush
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« Reply #1 on: December 22, 2006, 04:08:57 PM »

It should work fine.
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pdmattox
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« Reply #2 on: December 22, 2006, 04:15:12 PM »

That looks like it will work to me. cool
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Trot
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« Reply #3 on: December 22, 2006, 05:15:01 PM »

Sorry for busting in...
The idea is good!  But, one should never cut the hive  - if one can help it.  This hole is what?  Almost 1" across?  Big enough to let in mice?!

This should have been done, (cut) into inner-cover only! If the hole was double wide it would have been the same size as the big one. Top hole is normally about 3/8" X 3" wide.  There are no rules written in stone, for this...

I think that holes in bottom board are a waste?
The problem has been solved by cutting the top entrance!
As it was said: "It will do..."

Regards,
Trot 
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Greg Peck
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« Reply #4 on: December 22, 2006, 06:34:21 PM »

Thank you all  for your input.

Trot, The photo makes the upper hole look bigger then it really is. It is basically the same size at the notch that is normally in the inner cover. When the telescoping cover is in place there is not much space for mice (but they are squeeze little things). I was going to make a shim/spacer with a hole in it but did not have the time to do it right then. This hive body is old and is going to be replaced after the winter that is the only reason I cut it up and did it so roughly. I already had the inner cover notched and still had the moisture problem so that is why I cut into the hive. Are you saying that I would have been better off making the notch in the inner cover wider? Looking back on that now that probably would not have been a bad idea. It would be that same amount of open space but the mice would not be able to make it inside.
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kathyp
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« Reply #5 on: December 22, 2006, 06:43:54 PM »

if you get a SBB you won't have any problem with it.  we have had a nasty winter so far.  i put the board in when it's been really cold, but i can slide it out to make sure no water has collected and to check mite count later in year.  i had to idea that a SBB would be a good way to go.  i got mine because it's what the bee store recommended.  having used it, i really like it.

when you replace your hive, that's the way i'd go.  i started with a solid board when i first put my hive together.  it was given to me.  i switched when i added more boxes and i'm really glad i did.
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #6 on: December 23, 2006, 07:52:13 AM »

The best and easiest way to get proper (adequate) ventilation in your hives is to use a screened bottom board (SBB) and a top entrance.  If you need a quick top entrance just turn an old standard wolid bottom board up side down on top of the hive.  Even downunder a SBB should be benificial as it allows debre such as brood cappings to fall out of the hive.  If you ever end up with Varroa down there you'll be well ahead of everybody else.
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Finsky
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« Reply #7 on: December 23, 2006, 08:36:28 AM »


http://pix.epodunk.com/locatorMaps/pa/PA_14100.gif

You Greg live quite close to Brian.

Your forecast show that temperature is near freezing point. - Just like here. It is good for bees.

Wind may be a thing which is harmfull in these circumtances. I put my 5 smallest hives in the firewood shelter. It is dark and calm place.
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Trot
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« Reply #8 on: December 23, 2006, 04:07:02 PM »

Yes Greg. They are usually cut when one buys them. If not, one can cut them on a table saw. About 3" wide and be careful that you don't cut deeper than the groove for the play! Should cut just shy of the ply... not more than 6 millimeters - which is a bee-space. (About 1/4 " - 3/8" is a bit much...)

We have here some kind of bush-mice and some of the buggers will get in through a 3/8 opening!

Regards,
Trot
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