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Author Topic: Bad breath and bees  (Read 4933 times)
Cindi
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« on: December 10, 2006, 11:26:19 PM »

I was reading a post that a few were involved in regarding AHB.  Brendhan said that bees were prone to attack against dark colours and CO2.  Now this thing about the CO2 makes good sense and makes me understand why in a book named "the Spell of the Honeybee" the author speaks about how bees hate bad breath and to not breath your bad breath on them.  In retrospect, when I read this thought he portrayed on paper, I thought that at the time that it was kind of funny how he said this.  I wonder (this book written long ago) if Eric W. Kelsey actually realized that it was the CO2 that angered the bees, not really his "bad breath."  I really got a kick out of this when I started thinking about more about it. 

I have seen how irritated the bees do get if I happen to be looking too closely to a frame, out of breath maybe from doing some strenuous work with them, and I breath hard on them accidentally.  Maybe I do have bad breath and they really don't like it.  They certainly show their disapproval, and get rather noisy, so I have learned to not "breath" on them (I would hope that I don't have bad breath, ee gad!!!).
CO2, bad breath, oh dear.  Great day.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Finsky
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« Reply #1 on: December 10, 2006, 11:41:43 PM »



Some one is now making his own science. What is bad for us is different what is bad for bees.

What about light blue color - When you go to open hive with hat shirt you will get a lot of stings.

Breath is enough for bees. They protect their hives. They are not prepared to kiss you.
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Cindi
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« Reply #2 on: December 10, 2006, 11:55:57 PM »

Don't get it.  I would imagine they would not want to get too close for comfort so that means keep your breath away.  Great day. Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Jerrymac
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« Reply #3 on: December 11, 2006, 12:03:38 AM »

I go around my bees all the time with blue jeans and blue shirt. No problems. But if I happen to exhale on them, they get testy.
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rainbow sunflower  Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak.   rainbow sunflower

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« Reply #4 on: December 11, 2006, 12:26:53 PM »

I notice that they are upset more when I get in close and softly breath on them accidentally versus when I blow on them from a bit away to get them to move.

It is when I see the mite drop increase after inhaling them that know I need to brush my teeth. rolleyes

-rick
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« Reply #5 on: December 11, 2006, 02:57:50 PM »

i once went into the hive immediatelly after drinking a cup of coffe. don't try this at home, at the slightest hint of caffeine they got really emmm active.
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Cindi
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« Reply #6 on: December 11, 2006, 10:36:04 PM »

I think that with a gentle exhale, there is a very low percentage of strong CO2.  it is carbon dioxide that is so strong that makes them wince, like a deep drawn breath exhaled that is full of the chemical that they want to strike back out at.  Maybe they think it is a bear breath. LOL.  Like the mosquitoes, mosquitoes become active at night because we emit cardon dioxide and the mosquitoes look for that, whereas during the day the flora emit this cardon dioxide and so the mosquitoes stay with the flora and attack them, in whatever method they manage to achieve.  Science, not my thing.  Great day. Cindi.  I am into the flora and propogation.

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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #7 on: December 12, 2006, 06:21:04 AM »

I find it a pretty good test of calm bees.  I tend to move them around on the comb by breathing on them.  This is NOT recommended with hot bees.
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Mici
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« Reply #8 on: December 12, 2006, 09:42:59 AM »

hmm, CO2 in fact should calm them. just like the smoke is a sign of fire, if they can sense CO2, they should react in the same way, eat as much as they can and be ready for extraction evil

nope, mosquitos don't look for CO2, they just find a warm source, thermovision or something, like ticks. those mosquitos that "attack" floral are male, only females feed on blood.well, maybe not even the females, they just get the blood for brood.
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Jerrymac
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« Reply #9 on: December 12, 2006, 09:54:33 AM »

Mici,

Have to disagree. Mosquito traps use CO2 to lure the skitters in.

And the bees associate CO2 with preditors. Like Skunks, bears. They don't prepare for evacuation because of some animal.
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rainbow sunflower  Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak.   rainbow sunflower

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Cindi
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« Reply #10 on: December 12, 2006, 10:11:02 AM »

Mici,

Have to disagree. Mosquito traps use CO2 to lure the skitters in.

And the bees associate CO2 with preditors. Like Skunks, bears. They don't prepare for evacuation because of some animal.

So, I wonder if it is agreed, that human breath is what attracts the mosquitoes to our species?  Or do they just float around hoping that anything they happen to bounce into (or see) will give them blood, yes, I understand the females only inflict the bite, for the brood rear.  Interesting.

We sleep outside on our back porch that has fibreglass panels as a roof, during the summertime with our grandsons (and maybe a few young nephews).  It is our outdoor movie night.  We bring out the foams, blankets, pillows, popcorn, chips, pop, pillows, TV, DVD player and this is our fun.  We have great nights doing this and the kids really enjoy the outdoor movie.  BUT...there is a problem...the mosquitoes!!!  I have an excellent mosquito repellent that I use, it comes from the Amway company and is used in the deep forests by foresters.  They swear by it.  I do to..but I don't like to use chemicals on our bodies, but there is no much other choice.  I usually just put this product rubbed lightly on the top of the hair and on small areas of the tops of the hands.  It smells actually very nice, but it works like a hot dam. 

Oops....Getting back to the topic.  If we somehow disguised our CO2 levels, I imagine that it may also keep the mosquitoes at bay somewhat.  Before we enter into our summer sleeping outside I am going to do some deeper investigation into mosquito control.  Actually last summer we had a very dry, extraordinarily dry summer and the mosquitoes were hardly present at all.  But still, the bites are rather annoying to some people.  I am lucky in that they never bother me at all.  I don't know why, but I guess they don't like my blood.  Great day.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Mici
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« Reply #11 on: December 12, 2006, 01:03:02 PM »

hmm
, never even heard of mosquito traps. around here there are only plug-in pesticides available, keeps them out, if they're in they die. but i don't use them, it can't be healthy, the best protection i use is keeping the windows closed while the lights are on, during the night...maybe 1 comes in.  the best and most natural repelent would be Citronel. go to some store and buy citronel essential oil, when doing the laundry put one drop of it into the washing machine.

thanks jerry, would have never thought it, i'll be more carefull from now on.
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Jerrymac
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« Reply #12 on: December 12, 2006, 02:13:43 PM »

I am not promoting this product, just one example of a skitter trap


http://www.home-mosquito-control.com/lentek-mk12-mosquito-trap.php#works
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rusty
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« Reply #13 on: December 14, 2006, 07:33:34 AM »

Hi All,

 I have just read through this thread, and am surprised at the length of the discussion on the subject. I have copied the man who taught me to keep bees, when there are a lot ot the frame or a cluster I just blow gently on them and they move away, end of story.......
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Rusty Wise,

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Cindi
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« Reply #14 on: December 14, 2006, 08:16:40 AM »

Hey Rusty, but isn't it fun to discuss things.  I think that blowing on the bees for movement is an awesome tool for moving the bees gently.  Great day. Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #15 on: December 14, 2006, 04:47:45 PM »

Hi There Cindi,

I rushed that last post off quickly before I went to work and afterwards I thought it sounded a bit abrupt. No offence meant, just too much stress, glad you did not take it the wrong way.
I was just surprised at the topic, because I never thought of it in any other way, just blow on the bees to get them to move.

You are right discussion is a wonderful thing, and comunication very important, we can all learn from each other.

Actually I have missed dropping in on you all through the summer- very very busy, something to do with bees, I think!

Must remember to keep in touch,
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Rusty Wise,

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www.trafford.com (Search Desk)
http://www.pcela.co.yu/IndexE.htm
Jerrymac
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« Reply #16 on: December 14, 2006, 05:58:22 PM »

Must be nice having those kinds of bees. All I have seen don't like to be blown upon.
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rainbow sunflower  Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until you hear them speak.   rainbow sunflower

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     http://photobucket.com/albums/v225/Jerry-mac/
Cindi
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« Reply #17 on: December 15, 2006, 09:17:36 AM »

Rust, no offence taken whatsover!!! But thank you for the apology, divine.

I remember many times when I was working with the bees, and it was pretty warm outside, I would get rather short-breathed, because of the hard work.  I would be looking at a frame and indeed, I would blow my breath on them, probably pretty hard.  Each time that happened, I definitely noticed a "buzz" among the bees, never actually really noticed if it was an annoyed reaction, but I know that I heard them in disagreement.  I would always make sure I moved my face a little further from the comb and did not breath on them again at that point in time.  I saw no point in annoying them if that was indeed what it did.  So I have no clue.

I can't wait for this spring and summer to employ many of the little "tricks of the trade" that I have picked up from so many wonderful contributors to knowledge through this forum.  It will be another year of learn, learn, learn and with all this, much better health for my bees and lesss work for me.  Can't wait for summer....the winter solstace is getting closer by the day...LOL..  I told you you would get sick of me talking about the end of the short days, the days getting longer a couple of minutes a day, until it can get no longer and then begins the flight down to the shorter days on the summer solstace.  Yeah!!!!  spring does come.  Great day.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
brydie
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« Reply #18 on: December 18, 2006, 08:35:05 PM »

Hi there,

I was reading this post with much interest, especially the "mosquito theories" (by the way it's cute that you guys call them "skitters", may have to adopt that pet name for them here in oz).  Has anyone ever heard of taking vitamin B to deter mozzies (that's what we call them down under hehehe).

I have been taking a super B complex (available from chemist/drugstore) for about 6 months (prior to my move from southern Australia up north - plenty of mozzies up here), and it seems to have helped heaps.  My husband doesn't take it and he gets substantially more bites than me if we're sitting outside etc.  The theory is that the vitamin B gets in your bloodstream and puts out a "scent" of some sort via the skin, of which the mozzies do not like.  What I find is they simply land on you, and a few seconds later take off without biting.

My concern is of course - what will my newly aquired bees think of my "scent"?

Kind Regards, Brydie
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Cindi
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« Reply #19 on: December 18, 2006, 08:44:58 PM »

Now that is interesting about the vitamin B-complex.  I take quite a few vitamins and minerals every day.  And vitamin B is certainly one of the big ones.  Maybe they don't like it.  I have to wonder too.  They do not bother me one little bit, they may alight on my arm or somewhere, but I have such sensitive skin that I can feel them long before they even get a chance to think about taking a sip of my blood.  Good luck to the skitters!!  Great day.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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