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Author Topic: Snow in our town  (Read 1193 times)
Cindi
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« on: December 01, 2006, 09:39:09 AM »

We don't get alot of snow where we live,maybe once a year, for a couple of days, then it turns to slush and is gone.  We received substantial snow one day and night, it got cold so it stuck around, then snowed some more.  Today is very mild and the snow is melting like crazy.  At the high point the snowfall cover was probably about 16 inches deep, like I said quite a lot for here.  All kids were having a blast, they were being pulled around out the back on our quad that they hooked their sleds up to, we have quite a large cleared area where they can put the pedal to the metal, they had fun.  It will be gone mostly by tonight I would venture.  Just thought I would send a pic of what the snow looked like after the first downfall.  Pretty.  Great day.  Cindi.

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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
mick
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« Reply #1 on: December 01, 2006, 11:42:34 AM »

Now that LOOKs american to me, blue spruce? Whatever they are they look beautiful. We dont get scenes like that here.
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Ken
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« Reply #2 on: December 01, 2006, 06:15:41 PM »

Ain't that a beautiful sight. We get many sights like that our way. I like the sights but would rather not deal with the cold!
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pdmattox
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« Reply #3 on: December 01, 2006, 06:21:12 PM »

That is a really GREAT photo.  We do not get scenes like that in Florida.
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Cindi
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« Reply #4 on: December 02, 2006, 12:40:49 PM »

Now that LOOKs american to me, blue spruce? Whatever they are they look beautiful. We dont get scenes like that here.

The deciduous tree (bare branches) on the left is a big leaf Maple, the deciduous one next over is a burgundy leaf Maple, the deciduous on the far right is a bronze leaf Beech.  The conifers that appear in the background are Cedar and Hemlock.  I don't think that there are any fir back there.  They do indeed look pretty with snow.  We had another 6 inches fall after this picture and the trees really began to have a far more pronounced "weeping" look.  When I was on the front porch early the other morning, I heard an enormous cracking sound and I know that something broke and fell down in the ravine, probably from an old Alder, it sounded really scarey, I won't go down and look for a while, in case there is more precarious trees/branches.  There may not be these type of trees around where you live, but I bet you have some beautiful stuff that we don't have.  I love palm trees, wish we had some of those up here.  Great day.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #5 on: December 07, 2006, 04:47:53 PM »

great pic. I love getting that much snow here!!!!! Smiley
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« Reply #6 on: December 08, 2006, 01:00:11 AM »

Though we get that once in awhile here, it makes me homesick for Minnesota still.  AND I'VE LIVED MY ENTIRE ADULT LIFE AWAY FROM THERE while active duty then retiring here. shocked
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Everyone said it couldn't be done. But he with a chuckle replied, "I won't be one to say it is so, until I give it a try."  So he buckled right in with a trace of a grin.  If he had a worry he hid it and he started to sing as he tackled that thing that couldn't be done, and he did it.  (unknown)
Cindi
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« Reply #7 on: December 08, 2006, 08:36:40 AM »

Now this is interesting.  In hearing about all the different weathers in so many parts of the U.S. I am finding that I have somewhat an interest in finding out the types of weather that prevails from the north east/west to the south east/west.  Climate is a fascinating subject.  Great day. Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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