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Author Topic: eucalyptus arboretum  (Read 2290 times)
abejaruco
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« on: November 15, 2006, 07:52:14 AM »

There is a "eucalytus arboretum", a coleccion of different varieties of eucalytus (11 different), near of my hives. So, I have flowers every month.
The problem is that I have hives with ten frames of brood during november. That´s a problem if you want to treat the varroa.
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« Reply #1 on: November 15, 2006, 10:38:30 AM »

Just wondering, is eucalytus honey (or is it mostly a pollen thing) tasty, we have Almond honey which is mostly used for bee-food because of the bitter taste. Thanks.

Great photo too!
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abejaruco
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« Reply #2 on: November 15, 2006, 02:13:21 PM »

Eucalyptus honey is exceptional. Eucalyptus is a medicinal tree, and probably the honey too. And the pollen is sweet, nice for humans and with high protein level for bees.
http://www.honeybee.com.au/Library/Pollenindex.html
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« Reply #3 on: November 15, 2006, 03:23:16 PM »

That is wonderful to hear. I use to work at a dried floral warehouse and the dried smell of eucalyptus wasn't very pleasant, but I have had many flavored syrups and cough-drops (now that I think about it) and they were all very effective and tasty. Thanks again.
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Cindi
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« Reply #4 on: November 15, 2006, 04:38:00 PM »

What an absolutely beautiful flower this eucalyptus has, you have taken a stunning picture that makes one not want to stop looking at it.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #5 on: November 24, 2006, 03:28:14 AM »

Abejarecu you are a clever man! and I guess you go for the taste as well? Im amazed that you have the good old Eucy there. I know they are a pest now in the US and our diggers took seeds all over the middle east during the war. They are a great tree. Here of course we have hundresd of millions of them so you sort of take them for granted.

Id love to know what species you have. Id be glad to send you seed of anything that might be interesting or useful to you.
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« Reply #6 on: November 24, 2006, 08:57:21 AM »

I still can't get over the beauty of the flowers on this eucalyptus, I hve grown a few eucalyptus, but off the top of my head can't think of the cultivar.  Mine only grew as little plants, not even shrub-like, but very pretty.  No flowers.  I have seen pictures of eucalyptus growing on Saltspring Island, looks like it is a tree to me there.  I am going to find out if the eucalyptus growing there gets flowers like the one in your picture.  The bees are very dark looking, I am interested in bee breeds and how they look.  I am sure that I can find out more, but what breed are yours?  It seems that so many people on the forum talk about all different names of ones that they have, I have been very surprised at some of the names.  Great day.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
abejaruco
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« Reply #7 on: November 25, 2006, 01:27:56 AM »

Thanks you! You are very nice with your comments.
By the way Mick, do you know any recommendation or advice to obtein a better seeds germination?

Here I post a photo with my brother tasting different honeys in the Cordoba´s fair (Cordoba is the town where Senneca, Nero´s tutor, was born...any years ago) There was eucalyptus, meddlar, avocado, rosmarine, lavandula...

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abejaruco
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« Reply #8 on: November 25, 2006, 01:36:04 AM »

And the bees are the most occidental one, the german or nigra or mellifera mellifera. Actually in England, Germany, France, Spain and Portugal.
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mick
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« Reply #9 on: November 25, 2006, 06:14:44 PM »

Most species will germinate readily. Seed is ready at different stages of the flowering cycle. To make sure you get it at the right stage you can cover the flower with a paperbag, or cut the branch off, cover the flowers with a paper bag and hang in a hot place.

Sprinke seed on top of vermiculite or sharp sand and cover with 1mm vermmiculate or sand and keep moist. Keep at abt 25C and should germinate between 6 days and 2 months depending on the species. Dont let it get below 15C at night.

Some species seed is fertile only from the previous year, so check the trees for old seed pods. The seed has to be really really dry before you sow it.

Some species need to be chilled, so try putting some in the fridge for 2 weeks before you sow it.

Never ever fertilise the seed or seed raising mix.

If all else fails, soak some seed in water mixed with wood ash for a day then sow it.
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abejaruco
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« Reply #10 on: November 27, 2006, 08:59:39 AM »

Thank you very much! I´m going to "eucalypt" every corner.
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