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Author Topic: making a bee hive  (Read 25609 times)
queenb64
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« Reply #40 on: October 15, 2004, 11:50:27 AM »

good advice , thanks
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queenb64
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« Reply #41 on: October 15, 2004, 12:21:55 PM »

Ok Ok, yall slowed me down, I took a deep breath, and Im gonna try to research only. But I gotta ask, I put my foundation in my frames. Will it be ok until spring? Do I need to do anything to protect it? I hate to take it all apart, and mess stuff up
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Beth Kirkley
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« Reply #42 on: October 15, 2004, 02:04:03 PM »

Glad to see you'll be able to cope with the wait (for today anyway). Smiley Spend the winter with us, read old posts, research all over the net, and just learn learn learn. You'll have a good time visiting during the winter months with some really fun people on this forum. Maybe this winter we'll actually get the chat room going good since most people will be stuck inside. Alot of us are "outdoorsy" people, with gardens, or we hike, hunt, do woodwork, or whatever - so the warm weather has us outside. But the cold will bring us in, and boredom (and ideas) will set in. Before long we'll all be chatting about what plans we have for spring - concerning bees, flowers, vegetable gardens, bee hive designs, and of course bee hive splits for expansion.
Welcome aboard. MANY people on this forum didn't have hives for the first few months after joining, and I think there are still some that are waiting until spring for their first hive, even though they joined during the summer.
And check out the many other forums through the main site. There's stuff for nearly every one - cooking, gardening, christian fellowship, and more. Plus, if there's an idea you have, send it John's way (Beemaster). He may be willing to start other sections or forums if it seems interesting.
Good to have ya' here. Smiley

Beth
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« Reply #43 on: October 17, 2004, 10:01:20 AM »

I for one won't bee cooped up inside during the winter Unless we get a lot of rain rather than snow. I use the winter to cut next years wood supply up (am falling the culls now) for one thing. Nothing like being in the woods on a cold winter day and listening to the pop of trees from the remaining sap freezing, or how warm one gets from slinging a 8 pound splitting maul.
   Then there are the other fun things, snowmobiling and cross country sking. One thing I like is a new snow fall as I have the excuse to fire up one of my old tractors to plow my drive and a couple of other peoples just because I like to work those old tractors.
Out in the work shop there is no phone or other distractions so I can work on one of the old tractors with out interuptions.
Yup winter here is just as busy as the summer and for the most Part out side as much.




 




 
Cheesy Al
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« Reply #44 on: October 17, 2004, 04:14:37 PM »

al. first of all where are you located. Second, I noticed you didnt wrap tar paper or anything around your hives , and they are in the snow they at ok like that? I will be moving to North Arkansas in the spring, and will be in the Ozarks, should I wrap my hives over the winter there or will they be ok? They say that it only snows a few times a year and the snow only lasts a few days.
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« Reply #45 on: October 18, 2004, 07:57:39 AM »

Im in Michigan, winter temps (here) average mid 30'sF during normal winters. The Picture was taken after the first snow of December while I considered it still warm with day temps still getting into the 40F area. I did wrap them latter in the month. In Oct. I installed the dogeared fence as a wind block to the north and west of the hives. I really think in my case the wind block is the most important. I stain my hives dark, the bees glue up all the cracks with propolis. From what I have read on tar paper the benifit is The dark paper asorbs the suns heat and helps keep the inside of ther hive warmer on sunny days.
What you have to watch out for with wrapping is not to close off the entrance and the upper ventalation holes.
     Since I am so small at bee keeping I would really like to build a leanto building faceing south with sliding doors I would open in the morning on nice days and close them on extra cold days, just leave them open in the spring and summer. Reall the price considering the cost of package bees isn't that far out of line.
That works for one fellow I know who has a old dairy barn where the bees are kept in the winter. John Vavain the author keeps his bees in his basement in the winter.
 Cheesy  Al
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queenb64
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« Reply #46 on: October 18, 2004, 02:44:51 PM »

thanks for the reply, Nice pics, . I don't think my family would be very happy with me if I had bees in my basement. They have let me know the only parts they will help with is the extracting, and eating. lol
 
   How long have you had bees? I wont be starting until the spring, and may get lucky and inherit 2 strong hives that are on the property we are buying.  Have you used anything for mites? What have you used and has it been real successful? I am researching all this now and there are many out there. Trying to see whats safer for my future bees, and for humans that will consume the honey.
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Robo
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« Reply #47 on: October 18, 2004, 03:50:06 PM »

Quote from: queenb64
I don't think my family would be very happy with me if I had bees in my basement.


I have been keeping nucs in my basement for a few years now, without a hitch

click for more images


I have also experimented with different mite treatments thru the years and I am currently using oxalic acid in the interim until I can regress my bees down to small cells.
http://robo.hydroville.com/html/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=8
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BigRog
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« Reply #48 on: October 18, 2004, 06:25:17 PM »

Use those links and get in touch with a local club.
Things are different in different locals so the local informaiton is important. you can prob be in contact and maybe even join a local beekeeping club in Arkansas now, their newsletter should have some good info.
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queenb64
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« Reply #49 on: October 18, 2004, 08:31:10 PM »

ROBO,

     I have a question. I have already placed my foundation in my frames, will they be ok until spring? Can I just put them all in a cardboard box and seal it up until I can use them?
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Robo
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« Reply #50 on: October 18, 2004, 08:37:44 PM »

If they are wired, I would leave them in the super (so they are vertical) and they should be OK.

If they are not wired, they might warp.

Wax moths will not bother undrawn foundation.
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queenb64
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« Reply #51 on: October 19, 2004, 12:54:52 PM »

THEY ARE THE DURAGILT FOUNDATION, THEY HAVE THE METAL ON THE ENDS,  HOPE THEY WILL BE OK, THANKS.
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Robo
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« Reply #52 on: October 19, 2004, 02:02:34 PM »

You should be fine.  Duragilt has a plastic core so it shouldn't warp under normal conditions.

I am not fond of Duragilt, but I guess this is a pro for it.  You can store it over the winter Cool
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queenb64
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« Reply #53 on: October 21, 2004, 11:45:12 AM »

why are you not fond of duragilt? I am new to this so share your wisdom please. lol
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Robo
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« Reply #54 on: October 21, 2004, 03:51:51 PM »

It has a flat plastic center (no cell impressions), so if it is not put on when there is a nectar flow, the bees tend to strip the wax off and will never build comb on it once stripped.
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queenb64
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« Reply #55 on: October 22, 2004, 11:25:05 AM »

I see......hmmmmm
  Well I already bought  enough for 20 frames, and by the time we get moved there should be a nectar flow, so Im hoping it will be ok. BUT, if I ever order any more , what do you recommend oh wise one?  lol
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Robo
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« Reply #56 on: October 22, 2004, 07:31:05 PM »

Call me old fashioned, but I still prefer crimped-wire wax foundation for the price.
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golfpsycho
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« Reply #57 on: October 22, 2004, 08:04:49 PM »

I have to agree with Robo.  I have duragilt in my hives, and I don't care for it at all.  It's a real dilema, because drawn comb is an extremely valuable resource.  However, I have purchased a case of kd frames and wire, and I'll be assembling and wiring on these cold winter nights.  My plan is to make a first regression on my bees as I cull the duragilt.  I may even have to move the duraglit up and use the dreaded queen excluder!!!.... whoa is me.
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« Reply #58 on: October 23, 2004, 10:59:38 PM »

Thanks guys, I guess when the time comes (spring) I'll have to make to with what I have, I didnt know . I know Ill be contacting you guys before I invest any more money  LOL

  Well  "The Hive and The Honey Bee " came in today. Got alot of reading to do. Thats a huge book. Adding it to my collection. Hope I have it read before spring.

              Talk to you later, 2 am is not far away gotta get some zzzzz's, so I can get to work
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Beth Kirkley
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« Reply #59 on: October 23, 2004, 11:31:05 PM »

I buy pre-assembled frames with Rite-Cell foundation from Mann Lake Ltd. They work fantastic. No pins needed. No wires. And they hold together just perfect even being run around in a honey extractor.

And...... when it says "wax moths can not damage", they're right. I had about 7 frames sitting in the laundry room for several weeks. I had been meaning to put them back in the hive, but we had too much bad weather with the two tropical storms (from the hurricanes). When the weather was better, I went to get them out and put them in the hive. But I found wax moth larvea, and all this webbing had totally messed up the wax. But when I went to clean the mess up, it was SO easy. The wax moths had eaten at the wax, and woven the silk all through it, and this mess just simply peeled right off the plastic foundation. NO damage to the foundation at all.

Beth
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