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Author Topic: making a bee hive  (Read 25717 times)
Anonymous
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« Reply #20 on: October 03, 2004, 08:05:28 PM »

Hey guys, I took care of the measurement problem,   I have the hive boxes done, and the outer cover made, (except for the tin), starting on the bottom board. My family thinks Im nuts, because Im building this out of wood around the house, I wont be moving to Arkansas until the spring, its too late to do anything with bees now, and I wouldnt want o have to move them if I did get some. I am just really impatient when I get my mind on doing something, so to settle me down Im just building a hive. nuts huh? Louisiana stays warm for a while, I have worn shorts at Christmas. My landord(next door) has a tree full of bees down by the pond and bayou, Im going to put the hive there and see if maybe the bees will leave the tree and go in the hive. If the do, and they start working on the frames, Ill just give them to a local keeper. Like I said Im excited. I study about bees every night, I checked out books at the library, and purchased Beekeeping for Dummies. And of course Im here at this forum learning from the pros!!  Thanks yall for all your help.
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Anonymous
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« Reply #21 on: October 11, 2004, 09:38:41 PM »

well, I am almost finshed building my first hive. All I have left is what I call the landing strip. I have the aluminum for the top just got to put it on, and UPS will be here tomorrow with my frames from Dadant.  Then Ill finsih up and set it out by the "bee tree" and see what happens. Any ideas about what to expect? The tree is full, Im hoping to get them to come into my hive raise a queen, and start a colony. Its warm here in Louisiana  until sometimes after Thanksgiving. We have a few cool nights. Do you think Im nuts or do you think it may work?
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Robo
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« Reply #22 on: October 11, 2004, 09:46:51 PM »

Unlees the "tree" swarms, they aren't going to move from the tree to your hive.  If you want to get them out of the tree, your going to need to use the wire funnel method and buy yourself a queen.  Or cut the tree down and cut it open and claim the brood comb.
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"Opportunity is missed by most people because it comes dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison


BigRog
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« Reply #23 on: October 11, 2004, 09:58:18 PM »

Sign in, We all would like to know you and follow your adventure.
Moving a hive isn't that bad, if you have questions ask. I just had a hive given to me from Beemaster. I live in VA and He is in mid New Jersey. about 300 mi. went without a hitch and we both learned a lot. Ask us
That is why we are here, to share our knowledge and experiences.
To see the post about the move, with pics, go here.
http://www.beemaster.com/beebbs/viewtopic.php?t=1257&highlight=
Buy the way B&B (Beemaster and Bigrog) Hive moving consultants is open for business! LOL

You can do IT!
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"Lurch my good man,…what did you mean when you said just now that 'You've got better things to do than run my petty little errands'…….?"
Anonymous
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« Reply #24 on: October 12, 2004, 09:04:06 AM »

Twice now I have wanted bees to move from a tree into a regular bee hive. On both occations they have had ideas of their own and have found places in trees highup more to their liking. Yup should have split the tree trunk, carved the comb out and tied it into frames along with as many of the girls as I colud get in there.
Lesson learned for next time.
 Cheesy Al
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queenb64
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« Reply #25 on: October 12, 2004, 01:53:23 PM »

OK, I SEE. NOT A GOOD CHANCE THEY WILL LIKE THE NEW "CONDO" BETTER. oK bUT SEE THAT WAS SO EASY MY WAY. NOW YOUR TALKING ABOUT JUMPING RIGHT IN THERE WITH THEM BEES.. NOW YA GOT ME NERVOUS. mY PLAN WAS JUST TO SET UP THE HIVE, NEXT TO THE TREE, THE BEES CHECK IN AND HOMESTEAD THERE. SIMPLE. NOW I GOT TO GO GET THE BEES. WHEW , GOTTA BUILD UP MY COURAGE!!!

  MY FRAMES CAME TODAY, YAY!! MY BEE JACKET AND HOOD, SMOKER, FOUNDATION. SO LAST MINUTE THINGS TO DO AFTER WORK, AND IT WILL BE READY TO GO. HOW LONG WILL I SIT THERE LOOKING AT EVERYTHING BEFORE I GET THE COURAGE UP TO MESS WITH THE BEES? I DONT KNOW......LOL....LOL....
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queenb64
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« Reply #26 on: October 12, 2004, 01:56:26 PM »

WHEN I MOVE TO ARKANSAS, WHAT WOULD BE BETTER TO PROTECT MY APIARY? ELECTRIC FENCE (EXPENSIVE) OR CHAIN LINK FENCE, (PROBABLY EXPENSIVE).  THE PROPERTY WE ARE TRYING TO GET HAS 2 HIVES ON IT, THAT ARE VERY HEALTHY, THE MAN MAY LEAVE THEM THERE FOR ME. Cheesy
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queenb64
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« Reply #27 on: October 12, 2004, 02:00:12 PM »

BIGROG,

    REGARDING TRANSPORTING THE BEES ACROSS STATE LINES.

ARE THERE ANY RULES AND REGS, OR PERMITS YA NEED WHEN YOU TRANSPORT THEM LIKE THAT?  

  ILL BE RIDING ALONE WITH THEM , FAMILY ALREADY SET ME STRAIGHT  LOLOLOL
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"if you can dish it out, you better be able to take it"
Anonymous
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« Reply #28 on: October 12, 2004, 03:26:43 PM »

Most states have restrictions regarding moving bees across state lines. Normally you must get a state bee inspector to examine them before you can move them. He can issue you a certificate that they are healthy. You must check with any state that you transport them fhrough to find out the regulations for that particular state.
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BigRog
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« Reply #29 on: October 12, 2004, 03:39:47 PM »

Well I was supposed to have the hive inspected before it left Beemasters beeyard and have it inspected here as well, you would have to look into your stae regs as well as Arkansas's. The inspection is no big thing, but they do a very thorough job and look all through your hive. In your new home the State Apirist can more than likely steer yo to beekeeping clubs and /or experienced beekeepers in your area as well as give you a bit of  education as well. From what I have heard around here, The apirists are mostly interested whether or not your hive is healthy. You can try to contact your state or county aparist to find out.
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"Lurch my good man,…what did you mean when you said just now that 'You've got better things to do than run my petty little errands'…….?"
queenb64
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« Reply #30 on: October 13, 2004, 03:57:35 PM »

Ok  ya'll, I got my frames together, got the metal on the outer cover. I have to make my stand, and I got my gallon size pickle jar for my feeder. It fits good . I can't wait.. I think Im gonna make a bee -vac, and get those bees out of that tree. Its a small hole. May be easier. Think I'll get the queen?Huh  If I suck em up with the vac, and get the queen, in the process,  do you think they will start making comb in the new hive? Theres no way for me to get any brood from the tree without cutting it down. My landlord would have a cow. His wife is already stressing because we have alligators in the pond in the back yard. lol I got lines set to catch him.  I plan to take some pics and show you my hive, but remember, be nice, Im new at this, and not a wiz at measurements and all. I did my best. Its been a learning experience and its been fun.
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Robo
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« Reply #31 on: October 13, 2004, 04:57:20 PM »

Not to discourage you, but I doubt the bee vac will work.  You would need some heck of a suction to pull the bees off the comb from outside the tree.  Even if you could establish that much suction, it would liquify the bees when they hit the vacuum wall shocked
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"Opportunity is missed by most people because it comes dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison


BigRog
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« Reply #32 on: October 13, 2004, 09:13:24 PM »

Can't wait to see your pics. I'm sure your hives are fine, how do the frames fit?
Get a pic of your alligators too!
This is my first year so I know how exciting it is. If you don't get the queen the bees will just return to where she is.
How big is the entrance to the Hive in the tree?
Can you see inside?
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"Lurch my good man,…what did you mean when you said just now that 'You've got better things to do than run my petty little errands'…….?"
Beth Kirkley
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« Reply #33 on: October 14, 2004, 12:09:35 AM »

I definately don't want to discourage you, but I don't think the bee vac plan will work. At least not the way you mentioned it. I know you're ready to go, but your better options would be to wait until spring and either buy bees or catch a swarm. The bees in that tree could be used, BUT you really would need to cut the tree down - and I know that's not really an option. You do need some brood to keep the bees in their new hive. The queen and the brood are all the bees live and die for.

Is there a possibility you can find someone in your area that has bees? It's kinda late in the year, but MAYBE someone has a strong hive they would split. I don't know for sure if it would work, but if it was split maybe the bees would still start a queen off the young larvae.

I do hate to say this,  embarassed  but if I were you, I'd just spend the winter learning all I could about bees. You can day dream about bees, read about bees, cover your house in pictures of bees - what ever it takes to chill out that NEED to have bees RIGHT NOW. October is just not the time to start a new hive - too many factors might make it a complete imposibility.

I don't blame you on the excitement. Many of us were the same way. Once we decided we wanted bees, there wasn't anything that was going to stop us - it's a very strange addiction. That - or it could be a personality trait  embarassed LOL - cause my husband and I are getting a little bit that way with an idea of having meat goats. We can't get the goats till spring, but every extra nickle right now will be invested in post and fencing to prepare for the goats.

Beth
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queenb64
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« Reply #34 on: October 14, 2004, 11:04:29 AM »

LOL BETH cheesy
    I can tell you have been where I am  lol. I don't think the bee pics around the house , but I do research every day, steadily finding books, the web, this forum, etc. It is driving me nuts. I realize that my plan probably won't work, and it is late in the season, but in Louisiana its warmer than the north, I have worn shorts up until January. So I thought maybe I could get one sarted wnough to winter over. That would give me some hands on.  I can read and research, but until I get my hands in it some things dont register. It's true, how you get addicted. I am not an insect lover, believe me, but when I started checking  bees out it was just like a drug, I am fascinated. and now... I have a complete hive sitting in the shop, waiting for bees... That is REALLY driving me nuts. I probably shouldnt have built it but you know how it is. Thanks for all your advice. Fell free to throw more this way!!
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queenb64
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« Reply #35 on: October 14, 2004, 11:09:53 AM »

I went out in the pond yesterday, no sign of my new pet (alligator), but as soon as I spot him or catch him Ill send the picks. Have any of you ever tasted fried gator? If you haven't you're missing out!!   May yeah Sha!!!
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"if you can dish it out, you better be able to take it"
Anonymous
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« Reply #36 on: October 14, 2004, 11:34:21 AM »

My friends and relatives don't consider my addiction to bees a personality trait, they consider it a character flaw.
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BigRog
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« Reply #37 on: October 14, 2004, 11:40:52 AM »

I have had alligator andouille and it was great.
You can find more info about beekeeping in your area and maybe hook up with a experienced beekeeper in your area
Louisiana
http://www.labeekeepers.org/
Arkansas
http://www.arbeekeepers.org/

I'm sure you can find all you need to know about local info including whatever redulations are in place.
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"Lurch my good man,…what did you mean when you said just now that 'You've got better things to do than run my petty little errands'…….?"
Beth Kirkley
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« Reply #38 on: October 14, 2004, 06:50:44 PM »

LOL - yeah, people think I'm pretty weird to have bees. Smiley And some think that I must be SO brave. I don't really like bugs either, but I started researching bees to use in our greenhouse for strawberries, and got HOOKED!
I live in Georgia, and the bees do pretty much the same thing here as anywhere else. They do spend more time out of the hive, do a little foraging, and eat way less honey over the winter down here in the south. But one thing for sure they do that's the same is that they get themselves READY for winter come begining of September. The queen stops laying as many eggs, and they start kicking out the drones. This is pretty much universal for anywhere, even though the south is so much warmer. One thing that they do that's extra, is that they begin laying eggs much sooner. My hives starting growing like crazy in Febuary, and swarmed March 17th last year. In some areas of the world (many areas) they still have lots of snow about that time.

Beth
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Anonymous
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« Reply #39 on: October 15, 2004, 07:58:27 AM »

I know all about the excitement of wanting to get bees from a tree. Yes bees in a tree is what got me hooked too. Since I live here in the north I cut my own fire wood and cruise my woods daily. I take my dogs for walks twice a day, looking all the time for the trees which will become my winter heat. There was this old oak tree with the top broken out I had targeted for the fall of 2002 and a big Ash that had broken off at the stump and was laying in trees around it. While I was figureing out just how I was going to get that oak down I saw it was a bee tree so it was spared, The ash on the other had showed me no sign it had bees in it. I discorved them after it was on the ground and I had cut off about 14" of the comb.
  I didn't want them to die, so I looked for help saveing them. I found that help and was encouraged to get them in a hive come spring if they lived. They lived but wouldn't go in the hive, having a mind of their own as to what makes a good home. I bought a nuc for my start, they didn't make it thru my bungling first winter so I started over this spring. Today thanks to some very nice bee keepers I have 5 colonies with plans for 7 more next year.
I recommend you take the winter time to find a bee keeping club, or at least a mentor, who keeps bees,  get first hand help for your first year. The people on this site are some of the smartest bee keepers I know but they can not look inside your hive with you and show you some thing that is wrong. They can not smell what you are smelling when you open the hive. Unless you think you have a problem and show a picture they can't advise you on a fix. Case in point is I sent a picture to a on line bee keeper who helped me save those bees in a tree for the winter asking about some grainy stuff on the landing board. He to this day never has told me what the grainy stuff was but saw I had chalk brood and told me to vent the hive more to stop it. I never knew I had a problem. Find a Mentor.
See my post, http://www.beemaster.com/beebbs/viewtopic.php?t=1368 I recived no answer as to what is going on.
I'm calling a club member this morning to see if he can tell me what I'm seeing.
 Cheesy Al
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