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Author Topic: S.S. 2:1, crystalized  (Read 3172 times)
Michael Bush
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« Reply #20 on: November 08, 2006, 07:44:44 PM »

>I think, the proportion of sugar to water in the feeding syrup is by weigh not volume

Whatever the cause of the coincidence, a pint of sugar weighs a pound.  A pint of water weighs a pound.  It matters not one whit if you go by weight or volume or even mix the two.  Since sugar comes in packages that are weighed by the pound and since water is easily measured by volume, I just put a pint of water in for every 2 pounds of sugar.  If the package of sugar is opened and I don't know how much is there, I'll put a a pint of water for every 2 pints of sugar.  If I had a scale, I could just as easily put a pound of water in for every two pounds of sugar.

It's all the same.

This is NOT true for all solids and liquids, of course.  Just for sugar and water.

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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Cindi
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« Reply #21 on: November 08, 2006, 10:50:38 PM »

I think, the proportion of sugar to water in the feeding syrup is by weigh not volume, so 2:1 syrup means two kg of sugar in one kg=liter of water. Or 2# of sugar in one quater of water. I mix 10#(9 kg) of sugar in 4.5 liters of water and this gives me 3 gallons of 2:1 of syrup. It does cristalize when outside temp drops close to 0 deg C. And I red, I think in "Bee culture", that you need to give one gallon of this 2:1 syrup for each 9 pounds of missing stores.
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Hi Matt, I don't want to seem like a bother or a know-it-all, but way up north, we use the metric system.  It was a hard changeover from imperial to this metric system, so many years ago, but I am pretty much done away with the old imperial system, but I can still toggle fairly easily betweeen the two.  I now mostly use metric.  I hate to correct ytou, but you said that you mix 10# (9 kg) of syrup n 4.5 litres of water.  In reality, 10# of sugar weighs 4.5 kg, as there is 2.2 kg in a #.  I think that you meant 4.5 kg of sugar not 9.  I appreciate the response Matt.  Next year I have good advice from so many people in trying to keep bees fed properly.  Regards.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #22 on: November 08, 2006, 11:01:18 PM »



There is no need to make syrup feeding science. It is usefull that bees take in as strong syrup as they can but in some limit problems will occur. 

* Too light, I pour sugar flour into feeding box or into bucket and mix a little
* Too stiff, I add water into feeding box and stir it a little (bees become thirsty and it is slow to take)

I prefer to make light and then add sugar flour.  In proper temperature syrup gets it's saturating point and make no harm any more. If syrup is hot, it will be after cooling too stiff.

I make syrup at a time  as 50 liter amounts.
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Finsky, you said something that was interesting.  Are you meaning that if the syrup is heated too hot, then it becomes too thick after it cools.  Suppose the syrup was not heated as high, would the syrup then not be as thick when it cools.  another thing, what is sugar flour?  I am sure that I know what that may be, but have not heard that terminology before.  Thanks for advice. Regards.Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
mat
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« Reply #23 on: November 08, 2006, 11:16:37 PM »

I am sorry, it was just an error. I put two 10#bags=9kg in 4.5L of water. BTW I come from Europe and lived in Canada for five years before I moved to the States and I also do not  have problem using eather of the systems.
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mat
Cindi
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« Reply #24 on: November 09, 2006, 08:55:26 AM »

I am sorry, it was just an error. I put two 10#bags=9kg in 4.5L of water. BTW I come from Europe and lived in Canada for five years before I moved to the States and I also do not  have problem using eather of the systems.

Hi Matt.  Isn't it the strangest thiing to toggle between using two systems of measurement, etc.  I find both the Imperial and Metric have advantages and disadvantages.  I find that for measuring length, metric is superior, in that it is much simpler, the temperature is a different matter.  I know that 25 celsius is a wonderful degree to enjoy in the summer, but now I have forgotten what I enjoy just off the top of my head with speaking with Farenheit, I''m thinking 65 degrees is good spring weather for sure, it is T-shirt time.  How many bees do you keep, hobby or commercial?  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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