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Author Topic: November Hive Manipulation  (Read 1578 times)

Offline newbee101

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November Hive Manipulation
« on: November 04, 2006, 10:05:41 PM »
I have a weak Russian Hive that did not build up at all. I thought they had too much space so I took Finskys advice to Greg, and reduced the hive to 1 hive body and 1 super. The bees were on the North side of the hive, so I turned them around to be on the South side. I also arranged the 5 shallow frames of honey over them. The bottom deep was completely empty, except for one frame with some pollen in it. There is about 35 lbs of capped honey/sugar water in there. They have a hive top feeder, and are slow in feeding. Does this hive stand a chance?





« Last Edit: November 04, 2006, 11:44:51 PM by newbee101 »
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Offline Finsky

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Re: November Hive Manipulation
« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2006, 12:04:46 AM »

I just now looked the world map and I noticed how in south NY really is. It is about 40 latitude and on the level of Spain and Italy.

You hive seems quite clear that 1/2 deep is enough for it for winter and for early spring.  If you keep more room heat escapes  vainly to empty sapace.

A) Restrict the room with medium wall  http://bees.freesuperhost.com/yabbfiles/Attachments/tiny.jpg

B) OR make a 5-frame box from insulated board. It is good as mating hive.

Then in spring give frames of emerging bees from bigger hives and your Russian will be normal hive soon.

Offline newbee101

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Re: November Hive Manipulation
« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2006, 09:19:06 AM »
Finsky, Should I put the division board from the bottom, right up to the top of the honey super?
I would put them in a nuc box, but there would be no place for the honey that they really need.
Maybe I should make a shallow nuc box for the honey. Here's my traveling nuc box with hive top feeder and screened bottom board.
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Offline randydrivesabus

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Re: November Hive Manipulation
« Reply #3 on: November 05, 2006, 10:42:16 AM »
I just want to mention that latitude is not the only consideration when it comes to estimating low temperatures but that elevation is also a major factor.

Offline Finsky

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Re: November Hive Manipulation
« Reply #4 on: November 05, 2006, 11:17:00 AM »
Finsky, Should I put the division board from the bottom, right up to the top of the honey super?

I don't know waht you mean?

You take a proper  amount frames and then  shake bees brom another frames. Put frames only in one box.

Offline newbee101

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Re: November Hive Manipulation
« Reply #5 on: November 05, 2006, 04:09:17 PM »
Finsky,
I have a super on top of the 1 hive body. Should the division board (medium wall) go from the bottom of the hive to the very top, blocking off the empty sides of both boxes. I tried to draw on computer,  :-D  maybe you understand >>>>>>

« Last Edit: November 05, 2006, 04:32:16 PM by newbee101 »
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Offline Finsky

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Re: November Hive Manipulation
« Reply #6 on: November 05, 2006, 04:55:18 PM »
I have a super on top of the 1 hive body.

Quite a difficult solution.  :-D

Deep is best and then diminish the number of frames so that there are no empty frames outside beeball.

Offline latebee

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Re: November Hive Manipulation
« Reply #7 on: November 05, 2006, 09:04:44 PM »
 Finsky said       
 
Quote
I noticed how south NY really is. It is about 40 latitude and on the level of Spain and Italy
    Perhaps to clear the air on NY's climate I will post some climatic data and frost dates from my area of NY.I DO believe we are nowhere near as moderate as the Mediteranean areas of Europe.Here our first fall frost averages Sept. 16 and our last spring frost May 25(although June 5th is more like it).Our winter lows can go as low as -40 F,but that is unusual,we rarely get much lower than  -20 F. Daytime highs in Dec.,Jan.and Feb. are typically in the 20 F to low 30 F. I am at the 42 north latitude and 1250 ft. altitude.Willows start to bloom in March. Summer temps. range from  mid 60 F to high 80 F.Golden Rod usually stops in Oct.Hope this offers a clearer picture of the areas climate.
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Offline Zoot

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Re: November Hive Manipulation
« Reply #8 on: November 05, 2006, 10:14:36 PM »
Finsky,

Don't be decieved by New York's geographical location. The state has some of the severest winter weather in the continental US, both in temperature and snowfall. If I'm not mistaken, I believe Buffalo, on the edge of Lake Erie, even holds the record for the heaviest yearly snowfall.

Offline Brian D. Bray

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Re: November Hive Manipulation
« Reply #9 on: November 06, 2006, 01:09:48 AM »
Cutting to the chase.  IMO in the pictures posted the hive has a marginal or small population for effective wintering.  I would  reduce to 1 box total--no supers.  Leave 2 or 3 brood frames and stuff it with full capped frames.  Freeze the extra frames of honey, then as stores get used up thaw out a frame and replace and empty one.  Lifting the hve at weekly intervals will give a good hint as to when to put in a new frame.
I you want to use a super reduce the hive to the size of a supered nuc.
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Offline Finsky

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Re: November Hive Manipulation
« Reply #10 on: November 06, 2006, 01:22:05 AM »
.Willows start to bloom in March. Summer temps. range from  mid 60 F to high 80 F.Golden Rod usually stops in Oct.

That tells to me a lot. Our willows start to bloom in the beginning of March.  Flowers killing frost comes in the middle of September. Normally bees cannot fly any more after mid of September.