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Author Topic: Wax Moth Freezing  (Read 1216 times)
Patrick
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« on: October 28, 2006, 08:23:13 PM »

If I have a frame that has wax moth damage  less than 10%,  can I remove it freeze it then just put it back? Will it be ok if there was some brood that was frozen too. Do I have to remove the frozen brood and wax moths? Also, is there a way to treat for moths in the hive.  I had seen a few moth lava that fell through the screen but no damage up to 2 weeks ago then...bam. What could I have done when I saw the moths and moth larva lurking around but no damage? I see these moths all over my yard they are going to keep trying to move in. Other than a healthy hive what can I do?
Cheers,
Patrick
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2006, 10:21:30 AM »

You don't have to remove anything.  The bees will clean it all up.  If there are a lot of webs I like to cut them out and let the bees rebuild because it's less work for them than cleaning out the webs.
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Michael Bush
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Patrick
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« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2006, 10:45:30 AM »

Michael,
That is welcome news.  I was afraid I would be back on foundation!
I noticed in other postings about moths you recomend Certan.  I have been reading up on it and wonder.  Do you know if you can use this on active frames? (would you take the frame out shake of the bees spray the stuff on then put it back) , Or do you only need to use it once when you add a new frame?  Thank you again for all your help here on this site.
Cheers,
Patrick
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Within that little Hive
Such Hints of Honey lay
As made Reality a Dream
And Dreams, Reality-
E.D. 1884

<img src="[url]http://banners.wunderground.com/weathersticker/miniStates/language/www/US/CA/Eagle_Rock.gif
" border=0
alt="Click for Eagle Rock, California Forecast" height=100 width=150>[/url]
Michael Bush
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« Reply #3 on: October 29, 2006, 01:36:34 PM »

>I noticed in other postings about moths you recomend Certan. I have been reading up on it and wonder. Do you know if you can use this on active frames?

Yes.

>(would you take the frame out shake of the bees spray the stuff on then put it back) , Or do you only need to use it once when you add a new frame?

You can just spray it on the bees and the comb.  Ne need to shake them off.  You can spray it on a comb once and it will protect it as long as it isn't left out in the rain.

New combs would need to be treated.

Usually I just use it on combs I'm storing.  But it is helpful on a hive that is has an infestation along with reducing the space the colony has to protect.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Robo
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« Reply #4 on: October 30, 2006, 08:43:27 AM »

Quote from: Patrick
Other than a healthy hive what can I do?


That is the key.  A healthy hive should have no problem defending off wax moths.  I would be worried about the state of your hive if you have wax moths actively destroying comb in the same frames that have brood.  You might consider removing any excess super or brood boxes and consolidating them down to an area that they can manage.  If it is a weak hive, they will not be able to protect but a small area.
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