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Author Topic: Revolving brood box - no swarms?  (Read 2340 times)
Berous
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« on: October 28, 2006, 01:05:38 PM »

Just found an article about this invention in Hungary( has patent), where the brood frames are round and they have a battery motor attached that rotates the frames. Claim is that the swarm cells are turned upside down and then the nurse bees don't like that and destroy the cell. If this works it would be revolutionary. We could manage HUGE hives that would be really productive, without losing half the stock. Anyone heard of this and how can I get my hands on one to try out. Also the rotation is said to automatically keep them from storing honey across the top of the brood frames, so the round frames fill completely with brood.

PS same rotation is claimed to inhibit the reproductive capacity of varroa, which sounds too fantastic to me, but who knows?
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Finsky
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« Reply #1 on: October 28, 2006, 01:25:47 PM »

Quote from: Berous
Anyone heard of this and how can I get my hands on one to try out.


Yes, I am more interested to bye Eiffel Tower. It has offered to me  last week.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #2 on: October 28, 2006, 01:35:38 PM »

There are much less complicated solutions:

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesnaturalcell.htm
http://www.beesource.com/pov/lusby/index.htm
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Michael Bush
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Finsky
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« Reply #3 on: November 12, 2006, 12:53:10 PM »

 Reseach 2006

APIS MELLIFERA L.) AND VARROA DESTRUCTOR
P.Aumeier1,WH. Kirchner1, G. Liebig 2
1 Ruhr-University of Bochum, Faculty of Biology,Germany
2 University of Hohenheim, Bee research institute, Germany
E-mail: Pia.Aumeier©rub.de
Since 2003 the Kónya rotating-broodframe beehive (www.anivet.hu) is advertised
as a method of augmenting the honey yield, preventing bee colonies from swarming and
of Varroa destructor control.
In a triennial study we investigated the effect of unnatural movements of brood
combs by 1) weekly rotating all brood combs of 6 colonies during the swarm season, 2)
daily manipulating brood combs out of 8 colonies on three different ways: control =
comb never touched, rotated = comb rotated 180_dm; vertically, shaken = comb hit on
the ground three times with 40-50g, 3) using the replica of a rotating-broodframe
beehive for one season.
Macroparasites
47
Weekly rotation of brood combs neither influenced the population dynamics of
honey bees or Varroa-mites nor altered the honey yield. However, in contrast to control
colonies most test colonies could be prevented from swarming as weekly rotating causes
elimination of swarm cells. Daily rotating or shaking of brood cells did neither affect
fertility (93-100%) nor fecundity (2.6-3.0) of reproductive mites or mortality of mite
offspring in the brood cells. Independently of the type of manipulation both types of
mates were only present in 11-43% of single-infested cells shortly before hatching of the
young bee. The mites’ orientation in the brood cell solely seems to be impeded in terms
of the position of the fecal accumulation, which was randomly distributed only in rotated
cells. A colony kept in the rotating-broodframe beehive died from extremely high
Varroa-infestation after one season. Thus, we can not confirm any effect of unnatural
movements of brood combs on developing bees or reproductive Varroa-mites,
respectively.

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Mici
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« Reply #4 on: November 12, 2006, 04:41:07 PM »

isn't turning cells upside down close to fatal??, i mean, if you accidentaly put the cimb back in turned upside down you cause quite a catastrophy. all cells are built turned a bit up, i mean they aren't 100% horizontal.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #5 on: November 12, 2006, 08:13:03 PM »

>isn't turning cells upside down close to fatal??

Not at all.  Many people doing cut outs will purposely put the cut out combs upside down so the queen will not want to lay in them and they can pull them out after the brood emerges.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Finsky
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« Reply #6 on: November 13, 2006, 03:11:16 AM »


Not swarming

The easiest way to prevent swarming is to get a stock which is not eager to swarm. To put hive upside down every now and then is not necessary.
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