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Author Topic: Does this sound right?  (Read 2672 times)
nepenthes
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« on: October 17, 2006, 07:21:05 PM »

I am going to be purchasing my stuff for the Spring soon, My first 2 hives...

I plan on getting 4 hive body's, and Im getting 45 frames and foundation's(5 extra just in case?). I am also getting a Top feeder for each, a bee brush, a frame grip, looks kind of like a Vice or something that you would grab the frames with. A 4x7 smoker, and 2 bee veil's. and I plan on ordering the bee's hear soon too (spring). I plan on gettins suppers later If I need them... unless I should wait to get the other hive and just stick with one, so I can have a super ready? (I have a spending limit)

does it sound like I am missing any thing?
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« Reply #1 on: October 17, 2006, 08:51:49 PM »

There is usually a price break at 50 that's not available for 45, meaning with the quantity discount you might pay the same amount and get 5 more frames.  This is also true on all beekeeping products.  I look for the quantity price breaks and then for special sales.  I was able to buy 100 medium frames from Mann Lake Ltd for under $45.00.  Since I use starter strips 10 pieces of foundation gave me 100 frames ready to go for less than $50.00.  That's 50 cents for each complete frame.
I bought six medium 8 frame supers from Western Bee on a similar deal.  budget quality supers were $5.00 per box on sale and $4.50 per box if I bought 6 or more.  I wanted the the boxes for pattern to make more but got enough for 2-3 hives immediately.  
Combined with the frames from Mann Lake Ltd I spent less than $100 (including shipping) for 6 complete boxes and enough frames for another 6 boxes.
Expound on that example and do some prudent purchasing.
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« Reply #2 on: October 17, 2006, 09:58:09 PM »

I'd save the dollars and forget the top feeders and get a couple gallon pickle jars from the deli.  Much cheaper and better.  Use the money saved and spend it on better tools, you won't reget it.

If your going with wooden frames, spend the extra few dollars and get the ergo grips, If your using plastic frames don't get the ergo, it won't work,  in fact most frame grips don't work very well on heavy plastic frames



Also don't forget a hive tool.  Once again I would suggest spending the few extra dollars for the hook style, I find them the most useful.

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kathyp
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« Reply #3 on: October 17, 2006, 10:38:42 PM »

gloves?  i'd say that you could get by without the frame grip.  they are nice, but i don't use one and it's fine.  i may get one next year.  how about pollen patties?  if you can order them now and throw them in the freezer, it will save you from having a small order later.  or get the mix if you want, but it comes in bulk and may be to much for your needs.

you are getting bottom boards and tops of some kind?  you have lots of time. if you have the tools and skills, you may be able to make some stuff and save money.  there is a section here with plans for things.
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« Reply #4 on: October 17, 2006, 10:44:12 PM »

Yes, I getting bottom boards telsecoping tops, all that fun stuff... Im getting the Frame grip (must have forgoten to mention it) And I dont understand the pickle jar thing... I never understood those jar feeders any ways.

I have gloves around the hosue ill just use ruber bands and put them over the shirt and the gloves.. But I probably wont really use the gloves as the hives wont be doing much moving around...

 huh
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« Reply #5 on: October 18, 2006, 07:47:36 AM »

Quote from: nepenthes
I never understood those jar feeders any ways.


Very simple,  poke or drill 4 or 5 holes in the lid and invert it over the inner cover.  Allows the bees to access when it is too cool to break cluster and journey up thru a top feeder.  Easy to clean in the dishwasher when it gets moldy.  No troubles with ants. No robbing.  Easy to remove for inspections......




Same principle with a gallon jar and an empty deep box.
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« Reply #6 on: October 18, 2006, 07:50:25 AM »

Quote from: kathyp
i'd say that you could get by without the frame grip.  they are nice, but i don't use one and it's fine.


Drop a frame full of bees on the ground and you'll get some grips quickly shocked
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kathyp
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« Reply #7 on: October 18, 2006, 10:44:06 AM »

have come close a couple of times.  Smiley  that's why i'll probably get some this year.  was only trying to point out that if money was an issue, frame grips were not essential.
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
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« Reply #8 on: October 18, 2006, 11:09:38 AM »

Quote from: kathyp
was only trying to point out that if money was an issue, frame grips were not essential.


Very True,  but neither are extra frames, top feeder or a bee brush..

Or gloves or pollen patties wink
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« Reply #9 on: October 18, 2006, 01:45:49 PM »

true...i think if i were making the choice between pollen patties and gloves for package bees, i'd go with the pollen patties.  i didn't use gloves much until the bees got cranky near the end of the summer.

i missed collecting a couple of swarms last year because i didn't have extra boxes, frames, etc.  have corrected that for next year.

i think my total start up with bees, boxes, etc. was about 300 dollars.  that includes the extra stuff i bought later in the summer.
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
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« Reply #10 on: October 18, 2006, 02:37:35 PM »

Dont forget screened bottom boards, a must these days w/ mites. I started this year w/ two hives. In total, I have three deeps, three mediums all w/ foundation, SBB, slatted racks, smoker, gloves , veil, two hive top feeders, hive tool, grabber.

I dont use the grabber much, and I would like to get the hive tool w/ the hook.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #11 on: October 18, 2006, 08:34:59 PM »

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesnewbees.htm

Here's my advice.
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nepenthes
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« Reply #12 on: October 18, 2006, 10:05:44 PM »

For the feeder do I put honey or syrup in their? What all do I use? Could I use Those Canning jars instead?  Wont the liquid inside the jar leak out? or is that the pourpus to get the Bee's to clean it  up.

Thanks...
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« Reply #13 on: October 19, 2006, 05:16:15 AM »

Get the gloves! Regular gloves arn't as flexable,or sensitive as beekeeping gloves,and you will use them a lot.The same goes for the hive tool.If you are going to get a package of bees you may not need to woory about suppers the first year.On the other hand,If you get a 5 fram nuc early enough you might need 3 suppers per hive.Join your local bee club now they usualy have a beginners school over the winter,and they can help you with lots of info,maybe save you lots of money! good luck!
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nepenthes
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« Reply #14 on: October 19, 2006, 06:11:29 AM »

Ive tried getting ahold of my local bee club and they have given no responce in the past 3 weeks.

Ive given  up hope on a beeclub as of now, As for The Gloves, Ive been reading some books and they say I really wouldnt need gloves. And That you loose "feeling". Im really not that worried about supers, but I did get another Brood box because I think Hear up north (OHIO) we need a bigger area for the winter cluster (is that whats its called?) when they bunch up to gether sence it gets colder. So im working for two Brood boxes this summer, on each hive.

Im getting a hive tool, and Im really only worried about the feeder right now.

Thank you,
Cody
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« Reply #15 on: October 19, 2006, 06:34:06 AM »

What part of Ohio are you in? I live on the west side of Cleveland, if you're close, you could come by & check out my setup, & changes I plan on for next year. This was my first year, & I learned a lot of what not to do, LOL


Vince
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nepenthes
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« Reply #16 on: October 19, 2006, 07:07:08 AM »

Dayton Springfeild area.
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« Reply #17 on: October 19, 2006, 08:05:53 AM »

Quote from: nepenthes
For the feeder do I put honey or syrup in their? What all do I use? Could I use Those Canning jars instead?  Wont the liquid inside the jar leak out? or is that the pourpus to get the Bee's to clean it  up.

Thanks...


Sugar and water,  using honey of unknown source can easily spread disease.  Besides, sugar is cheaper.  You can use any glass jar with a airtight lid.  When you first invert the jar, some will leak out until a vacuum is established in the jar,  then it will not leak.   It is the same principle as a boradman feeder except you put it were the bees can access it when it's cold, and it is protected from robbing.   The bees will suck the syrup thru the hole you poke in the lid.

The size jar you use only dictates how often you need to refill.   A pint jar will fit inside an empty medium super, and the gallon jar fits inside and empty deep.

Any jar with a air tight lid works fine.  Jelly, spaghetti sauce, pickle, etc.

Here is some good reading about feeders.
http://mainebee.com/articles/march2001.php
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nepenthes
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« Reply #18 on: October 19, 2006, 02:44:29 PM »

huh

Thanks alot but I have a few more questions then that should be it.

does the JAr need to be raised off the Hive so they can reach it or do I just put an empty super on and set the Jar's in it?
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« Reply #19 on: October 19, 2006, 02:52:48 PM »

Either way works, and I've done it many ways. I usually just invert the jar over the hole in the inner cover.  If it is a gallon jar, it will cover the entire hole so if you want some ventilation or for the bees to access the area, put it on a couple of wooden shims.  If it is really cold and the cluster is small, then right on top the frames makes it easier for them to get to.  In that case put some insulation material in the empty box to help keep the heat in the cluster.
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