Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
April 18, 2014, 08:52:54 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Beemaster's official FACEBOOK page
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Crowds at the entrance reducer?  (Read 2261 times)
2-Wheeler
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 202


Location: Leyner, Colorado - USA


WWW
« on: October 15, 2006, 07:08:12 PM »

Last week we placed the mouse-guard/entrance reducer on the hive, since we've had several frosts and the weather has been cooling off.  But nice weather today, in the middle 70s got them out foraging again. Now there seems to be a bit of a traffic jam at the entrance.


I'm just wondering if this is normal, or if we put the reducer on too soon?

(This is the type of reducer we installed: https://www.dadant.com/catalog/popup_image.php?pID=212
Logged

-David Broberg   CWOP#: CW5670 / CoCoRaHS #CO-BO-218
Blog: http://beesandblooms.blogspot.com/
My Weather: http://www.leyner.org/
My Flickr Album: http://www.flickr.com/photos/dbroberg/
Kirk-o
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1059


Location: Los Angeles california


« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2006, 07:40:24 PM »

I have bees in L A but I also had bees in Salt lake city winters are cold there also .I'm sure as the season progresses and gets cooler you will have less congestion I'm sure you are fine
kirko
Logged

"It's not about Honey it's not about Money It's about SURVIVAL" Charles Martin Simmon
leominsterbeeman
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 461


Location: Leominster, MA


WWW
« Reply #2 on: October 15, 2006, 09:25:09 PM »

The way that picture looks....
 
Two cars parked on top of a hive to keep the cover on.
Logged

Brian D. Bray
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 7369


Location: Anacortes, WA 98221

I really look like this, just ask Cindi.


WWW
« Reply #3 on: October 16, 2006, 01:23:49 AM »

The bees keep those cars for off roading in their spare time.  I believe that call that an upper level garage.  LOL
Logged

Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
bee whisper
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 9


Location: Western N.C


« Reply #4 on: October 16, 2006, 09:47:02 PM »

I belive it will be OK.I hope so anyway, because mine is the same way.One question though.Are you feeding?
Logged
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13475


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #5 on: October 17, 2006, 06:39:29 AM »

You're three feet off the ground.  You don't need mousegaurds.  You need stilts.
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
2-Wheeler
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 202


Location: Leyner, Colorado - USA


WWW
« Reply #6 on: October 17, 2006, 10:48:18 PM »

Quote from: bee whisper
One question though.Are you feeding?


No. The bees seemed to have a surplus of honey stores. More details are on the blog, with pictures: http://beesandblooms.blogspot.com/

Quote from: Michael Bush
You're three feet off the ground. You don't need mousegaurds. You need stilts.


Yes it seems like we need a ladder when we have two or three supers on top of that stack. I think someone teases me everytime I show a picture. But you should see how high the mice can jump and how they skinny up a pole if motivated. I just didn't want to take any chances.
Logged

-David Broberg   CWOP#: CW5670 / CoCoRaHS #CO-BO-218
Blog: http://beesandblooms.blogspot.com/
My Weather: http://www.leyner.org/
My Flickr Album: http://www.flickr.com/photos/dbroberg/
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13475


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #7 on: October 18, 2006, 08:39:09 PM »

> But you should see how high the mice can jump and how they skinny up a pole if motivated. I just didn't want to take any chances.

Here's mine and I never get mice:

http://www.bushfarms.com/images/EightTenEightHives.jpg
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Zoot
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 466

Location: Dickerson, MD


« Reply #8 on: October 18, 2006, 10:42:32 PM »

MB,

Is that a stack of nucs on the left? Also, the dark circles - I assume they are holes...are they screened? They appear to be about 2 inches in diameter?
Logged
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13475


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #9 on: October 19, 2006, 08:55:09 PM »

>Is that a stack of nucs on the left?

Yes.

>Also, the dark circles - I assume they are holes...are they screened?

No.

> They appear to be about 2 inches in diameter?

No.  The are about 1" in diameter.
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
tillie
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1738


Location: Atlanta, GA

Bee in N Georgia on a Blackberry flower


WWW
« Reply #10 on: October 26, 2006, 11:04:50 PM »

Every time I put on something at the entrance - robber screen, entrance reducer - it takes the bees a while to adjust to the fact that it's less easy to get into the hive - They always bunch up around whatever entrance there is for several days until they get used to it and then all goes back to normal.  

After all, with no entrance reduction, they can come and go at any point in the front of the hive.  Suddenly all of them have to come in a one inch door - humans queue up with small entrances as well!  At the huge Phillips Arena, we see masses of people crowding as they approach the one entry gate where only one person at a time can go into the Arena.

Linda T in Atlanta where my bees are often gathered enmasse in front of the entrance
Logged

http://beekeeperlinda.blogspot.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"You never can tell with bees" - Winnie the Pooh


Click for Atlanta, Georgia Forecast" border="0" height="60" width="468
Brian D. Bray
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 7369


Location: Anacortes, WA 98221

I really look like this, just ask Cindi.


WWW
« Reply #11 on: October 27, 2006, 08:57:03 AM »

When using entrance reduces, especially at the smallest setting, it is important to recognize the it is designed to prohibit unlimited access and prevent incursions of mice etc.  When the weather gets warm enough for the bees to do a little house cleaning there will always be a traffic jam at the reduced entrance.  The trade of is better hive security over all.  It's not always possible to adjust the entrance size with each change of weather.
Logged

Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
Finsky
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2791


Location: Finland


« Reply #12 on: October 27, 2006, 09:41:39 AM »

Traffic jam in entrance in autumn, I do not believe it.

Mostly there is a gang or a reception for robbers.  

Hive may be too hot in the middle of day but not at night.

When hive has finger tip size upper entrance, huge amount of bees go through without jam. Lower entrance is 10 times bigger and it has jam. So it must be something else.

During  some time of day home bees come out to clean themselves and it seems jam mut it lasts about half a hour.
Logged
Rich V
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 212

Location: Northern Illinois


« Reply #13 on: October 27, 2006, 09:54:01 AM »

Why don't you give them a top entrance?
Logged
2-Wheeler
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 202


Location: Leyner, Colorado - USA


WWW
« Reply #14 on: October 28, 2006, 11:25:50 PM »

Quote from: Rich V
Why don't you give them a top entrance?

I have installed a top-entrance, but so far I've only seen a few using it on warm days.  We also had our first big snow and the lower entrance was burried for about a day and a half.

Thanks for all the guidance.  I think it was either:
A: They were still getting used to the new entrance or
B: They were just out for some fresh air.

The picture was taken in early evening on a warm day just after installing it. This was the time of day that they normally come rushing back home. I haven't seen any such traffic jams since, just a more orderly process.
Logged

-David Broberg   CWOP#: CW5670 / CoCoRaHS #CO-BO-218
Blog: http://beesandblooms.blogspot.com/
My Weather: http://www.leyner.org/
My Flickr Album: http://www.flickr.com/photos/dbroberg/
Brian D. Bray
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 7369


Location: Anacortes, WA 98221

I really look like this, just ask Cindi.


WWW
« Reply #15 on: October 29, 2006, 06:14:40 PM »

Of interest in using top entrances:  the bees prefer it and will switch very rapidly during high activity.  Going to a top entrance opens the lower entrance as a backdoor, and often unguarded, entrance for mice, SHB, Wax Moths, etc.  The lower entrance if left open can cause excessive ventilation during winter which can result in chilled bees.
Logged

Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.365 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page February 27, 2014, 07:49:54 AM
anything